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CONTENTS OF VOL. II.

CHAPTER XIV.

Visits Washington.—Plan for the Occupation of Mexico.—Opposition

to Southern Expansion the Motive for the Peace.-Applies for his

Brevet.—His Opinion of the Regular Army.—Quitman and the

Vice-presidency.-Gen. Butler. -Prescntation of a Sword. --Nom-

inated for Governor.—Election.- Inaugural.-Political Movements

in Mississippi.—Union of Parties. ---Judge Sharkey.-Conventions.

-The Adjustment or Omnibus Bill.-President Taylor.-Secret

Call upon the President.-His Inflexibility.-Civil War imminent.

-Views of Gov. Quitman.-Gov. Seabrook. -Position of South

Carolina. — Gen. Henderson, of Texas. — Letter to Hon. John J.

M‘Rac.-Convenes 'the Legislature, -His Message. — Action of

that Body......

...Page 7

CHAPTER XV.

*Cuba.-General Lopez.-Interview with Mr. Calhoun.-Visits Gov-

crnor Quitman.-IIis personal Appearancc.- Proposals rejected.

Quitman's Reason therefor.–Fillmore's Proclamation.-Its illegal

Character.-Indictment and threatened Arrest of Quitman.-Let-

ter from Hon. Jacob Thompson.—Letters to the United States Dis-

trict Attorney.-Letter from General Henderson.—Governor Quit-

man resigns.-Patriotism of the Ladies.-Arrested.--Appears in

Court in New Orleans.—Is discharged.--Reception by the Pcople.

- Legal View of the Casc. - Original Letters from La Fayette,

· Adams, Webster, and Clay.--Lopez sails for Cuba.-Failure of the

Expedition, and the Causc.—Ilis Capture and Death.-Capture of

Crittenden nnd lnrty.—Their Exccution.—Atrocitics in Ilavann.

-Death to the Americans.-Future Retribution.--The Proclama-

tion and General Concha. - The Liberators vindicated.- Great

Britain and Francc.- Power of Republics.-Our proper Policy.. 53

CIIAPTER XVI.
Effects of the Compromiso in Mississippi.--Reorganization of Par-

tics.-Union Party.-Southern Rights Party.- Foote nominated

for Governor.-Influence and Patronage of the Federal Govern-

ment.—Mr. Webster.-Letter from Judge Clayton.—Quitman's

Position. - South Carolina Correspondence. — Renominated for

Governor.-Contrast between Quitman and Foote. — Their Can-

vass.—Rupture.—Success of the Unionists. + Declension of Quit-

man

..Page 114

CHAPTER XVII.

Colonel Davis.—Union Convention.-Governor Foote.-Quitman's

Vicws. — Democratic Stuto Convention. —Quitman's Speech.-

Letter to B. F. Dill.-Presidential Election.-General Pierce.-

Letter to Chapman. — Letter to Central Committee. — General

Scott.-Correspondence with Judge Wilkinson.—Elwood Fisher.

-R. D. Cralle. — Nominated for Vice-president in Alabama. —

Memphis Convention.— The Doctrine of Protection.—Quitman at

Rhinebeck.-Defends the Institutions of the South.-Mcditates

the Liberation of Cuba.- Arraigned in New Orleans.--IIis De-

fense. - Reply to Judge Campbell.—Letter to Thomas Reed and

II. T. Ellett.-llis Rclutions with Cuba not yet to be explaincil 118

CHAPTER XVIII.

Fifth Congressional District.—Letter to Judge Stone.—Is nominated

for Congress.—Know Nothing Party.—The Canvass.—Letters.

His Position in Congress. --Great Speech on thc Neutrality Laws.

-Its Effect.—Letter from James K. Paulding.-Col. E. G. W. But-

ler.—Dr. Samuel A. Cartwright ..........

210

CIIAPTER XIX.

Quitman and the Vice-presidency. – Buchanan and Fremont. -

Speech on Federal Relations. Its Influence on Public Opinion.-

His Views on the Slave-trade.—The subject considered. — Views

of Luther Martin.- Argument of Major Marshall.—Re-elected to

Congress. — Decline of his IIcalth.-Ilis last political Letters.-

The English-Kansas Bill.—Quitman's Vote.— The North and the

South.—Alarming Posture of Affairs.-Can the Union be pre-

served ? .......

231

CHAPTER XX.

Quitman visits South Carolina.—His Appreciation of that State.-

Reception in Columbia.—The Palmetto Association.-Contrast
between Quitman and Calhoun.-llis last Letter from Washing-
ton.-Declino of his lealth.—Jonrncy homo.- Last Letters.-

LIFE AND CORRESPONDENCE

OF

JOHN A. QUITMA N.

CIIAPTER XIV. Visits Washington.—Plan for the Occupation of Mexico.-Opposition

to Southern Expansion the Motive for the Peace.-Applies for his Brevet.—His Opinion of the Regular Army.—Quitman and the Vice-presidency.-Gen. Butler.—Presentation of a Sword.--Nominated for Governor.-Election.- Inaugural.-Political Movements in Mississippi.—Union of l'artics.-Judge Sharkcy.-Conventions. -The Adjustment or Omnibus Bill.-President Taylor.--Secret Call upon the President. - Ilis Inflexibility.-Civil War imminent.

– Vicws of Gov. Quitman.-Gov. Scabrook.-Position of South Carolina. — Gen. Henderson, of Texas. — Letter to Hon. John J. M'Rae.--Convcnes the Legislature. - His Message. — Action of that Body.

On his arrival at Washington Gen. Quitman urged upon the President and sccretary of war tho permanent military occupation of Mexico, and showed that it might be held without expense to the United States, and with but temporary opposition from the Mexican people.

"H10W SHALL WE OCCUPY MEXICO ? "To occupy the whole country in detail would be liable to several objections.

" It would require a great increase of force and much expense.

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