Force Benedict

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Hodder & Stoughton, 10.04.2014 - 352 Seiten

Second World War fighter pilot Eric Carter is one of only four surviving members of a secret mission, code-named 'Force Benedict'. Sanctioned by Winston Churchill in 1941 Force Benedict was dispatched to defend Murmansk, the USSR's only port not under Nazi occupation. If Murmansk fell, Soviet resistance against the Nazis would be hard to sustain and Hitler would be able to turn all his forces on Britain...

Force Benedict was under the command of New Zealand-born RAF Wing Commander Henry Neville Gynes Ramsbottom-Isherwood, who led two squadrons of Hurricane fighters, pilots and ground crew which were shipped to Russia in total secrecy on the first ever Arctic Convoy. They were told to defend Murmansk against the Germans 'at all costs'.

'We all reckoned the government thought we'd never survive' - but Eric Carter did, and was threatened with Court Martial if he talked about where he'd been or what he'd done. Now he reveals his experiences of seventy years ago in the hell on earth that was Murmansk, the largest city north of the Arctic Circle. It will also include previously unseen photos and documents, as well as exploring - for the first time - other intriguing aspects of Force Benedict.

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Inhalt

Maps Foreword
Authors Note
TheGathering Storm 2 TheBattleof Britain 3 Ad Astra
Transition
Force Benedict
An Assembly 7 Convoy 8 From Little Acorns
The Erection Party
Picture Section 1
Killing Time
Whiteout
A Rude Awakening
Russian Conversion
Picture Section 2
Band of Brothers
Epilogue
Acknowledgements

First Blood
An Arrival andan Aftermath 13 Reunited

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Über den Autor (2014)

Following Eric Carter's role in the defence of Murmansk, he also saw service defending the skies over England and, towards in the end of the war, in India and Burma fighting against the Japanese. After World War II, Eric forged a successful career in electrical engineering and continued to fly as a private pilot. Most recently, he was awarded the Arctic Star following a long-fought campaign for a medal to recognise those who risked their lives in the Arctic during World War II.

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