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" As a sick girl. Ye gods, it doth amaze me A man of such a feeble temper should So get the start of the majestic world And bear the palm alone. Why, man, he doth bestride the narrow world Like a Colossus, and we petty men Walk under his huge legs and peep... "
Elocution; Or, Mental and Vocal Philosophy: Involving the Principles of ... - Seite 242
von C. P. Bronson - 1845 - 368 Seiten
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Excel Preliminary English

David Mahony - 2003 - 282 Seiten
...astounding life, petty events are used to strike down a great man. Cassius concludes after these examples: Ye gods, it doth amaze me A man of such a feeble temper...start of the majestic world And bear the palm alone. His case is not convincing; it is abusive of its object. Yet it helps to bring Brutus into the plot....
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Play

Frank Julian Philips - 2003 - 179 Seiten
...soraething is nothing, or the contrary. I quote a passage from Shakespeare's Julius Caesar'. Cassius: "Why, man, he doth bestride the narrow world. Like...under his huge legs, and peep about To find ourselves dishonourable graves. Men at some time our masters of their fates: The fault, dear Brutus, is not in...
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Shakespeare Made Easy: Julius Caesar

Tanya Grosz - 2003 - 46 Seiten
...eye sees not itself but by reflection, by some other thing." Act one, Scene 2, Brutus to Cassius 2. "It doth amaze me, a man of such a feeble temper should...start of the majestic world, and bear the palm alone." Act one, Scene 2, Cassius to Brutus (continued) Caesar and Current Events (continued) Group 2 1 . "Men...
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Contributions to The Champion and Related Writings

Henry Fielding - 2003 - 687 Seiten
...make a Monopoly thereof. Coke is speaking of privy councilors. ' I. ii. 135-37: 'he | Caesar | doth bestride the narrow world | Like a Colossus, and we...petty men | Walk under his huge legs and peep about.' I )uring the latter years of Walpole's tenure there were hostile depictions ot him, in both picture...
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An Eye for Hitchcock

Murray Pomerance - 2004 - 306 Seiten
...discussion between Cassius and Brutus about the ability of a weak man to rise to power. Cassius states: Ye gods, it doth amaze me A man of such a feeble temper...under his huge legs and peep about To find ourselves dishonourable graves. Men at some time are masters of their fates: The fault, dear Brutus, is not in...
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Middlemarch: A Study of Provincial Life

George Eliot - 2004 - 744 Seiten
...224 BCE. There is an echo here of Shakespeare's Julius Caesar (1623), Act 1, Scene 2, lines 133-35: "Why, man, he doth bestride the narrow world/ Like...peep about/ To find ourselves dishonorable graves." Controlled bleeding and raising of blisters, treatments associated with the outmoded medical practices...
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The Social Life of Emotions

Larissa Z. Tiedens, Colin Wayne Leach, Keith Oatley - 2004 - 360 Seiten
...Cassius, a literary prototype of the envying person, as he protests the honors being heaped on Caesar: Why, man, he doth bestride the narrow world Like a...peep about To find ourselves dishonorable graves. (Shakespeare, 1599/1934, p. 41) These words show an important quality of envy. The envying person notices...
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Take the Rich Off Welfare

Mark Zepezauer - 2004 - 183 Seiten
...Two: Big Business Breaks FOOP STAMPS Tax Avoidance by Transnationals ($137.2 billion a year) UUhy. man, he doth bestride the narrow world like a colossus,...legs, and peep about to find ourselves dishonorable graves."1 Cassius's description of Caesar is hard to beat for giving the flavor of how transnational...
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Studying Shakespeare: A Guide to the Plays

Laurie Maguire - 2003 - 260 Seiten
...Cassius's scorn for these infirmities, including Caesar's inability to cross the Tiber, is undisguised: "it doth amaze me / A man of such a feeble temper...start of the majestic world / And bear the palm alone" (1.2.128-31). 13 Occasional illness, and failure to qualify for the swimming team, have never precluded...
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Il piacere dell'odio

William Hazlitt - 2004 - 163 Seiten
...William Shakespeare, in La commedia degli errori, IV, 4, 44. 22. «farsi avanti.. grandi»: Id., «A men of such a feeble temper should So get the start of the majestic world, and bear the palm alone», Giulio Cesare, I, 2, 130-131 (parole di Cassio a Bruto, a proposito della debolezza del divo Cesare)....
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