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The mercenary practice of men in the choice

No.
May, a month extremely subject to calentures
in wornen - - -
The Spectator's caution
account - - 55
Dangerous to the ladies - - - - 395
Described - - - - - 425
Mazarin, (Cardinal) his behaviour to Quillet,
who reflected upon him in a poem
Meanwell, (Thomas) his letter about the free-
doms of married men and women -
Memoirs of a private country gentleman's life
Memory, how improved by ideas of the imagi-
nation - - - - - - - 417
Men of the town rarely make good husbands 522
Merab, her character - - - - -
Merchant, worth and importance of his cha
racter - - - - - - -
Merchants of great benefit to the public 69, 174
Mercy, whoever wants it has no taste of enjoy-
ment - - - - - - -
Merit, no judgment to be sormed of it from suc-

- - - 5
to females on that

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cess - - - - - - 3
Valuable according to the application of it 340
Merry part of the world amiable - - 598
“Messiah," a sacred eclogue - - - - 378
The Jews' mistaken notion of the Messiah's
worldly grandeur -, - - - - 610
Metamorphoses, (Ovid's) like enchanted ground 417
Metaphor, when noble, casts a glory round it 421
Metaphors, when vicious - - - - . 595

of wives - - - - - -
Men differ from one another as much in sen-
timent as features - - - - -

Their corruption in general - -

Man the middle link between angels and

brutes - - - - - - 4
What he is, considered in himself - - 441
The homage he owes his Creator - - 441
By what distinguished from all other crea-
tures - - - - - - - 494
$uffers more from imaginary than real evils 505
His subjection to the female sex - - 510
Wonderful in his nature - - - 519
The two views he is to be considered in - 588
An active being - - - - - 624
His ultimate end - - - - - 624
Manilius, his character - - - - 467
Maple, (Will) an impudent libertine - 203
March, (month of) described - - - 425
Marcia's prayer in Cato - - - - 593
Mariamne, the fine dancer -

- - - - 466
Marlborough, (John Duke of) took the French
lines without bloodshed - - - 139
Marriage: those marriages the most happy that
are preceded by a long courtship -
Unhappy marriages, from whence proceeding 268
Marriage life, always a vexatious or happy con-
dition - - - - - - - 149
Married condition rarely unhappy but from
want of judgment or temper in the husband 479
Advantages of it preserable to a single state 479,500
Termed purgatory by Tom Dapperwit - 482
The excellence of its institution - - 490
The pleasure and uneasiness of married per-
sons, to what imputed - - -

An instance of it - - - - - 595
Method, the want of it, in whom only support-
able - - - - - - - - - 476

The use and necessity of it in writings - 476
Seldom found in coffee-house debates - 476
Military education, a letter about it - - 566
Mill to make verses - - - - - 220
Miller, (James) his challenge to Timothy Buck 436

Milton’s ‘Paradise Lost: the Spectator's criti-
cisms and observations on that poem, 267,
273, 279, 285,291, 297, 303, 309, 315,321
His subject conformable to the talents of
which he was master - - - - 315
His fable a master-piece - - - 315
A continuation of the Spectator's criticism on
“Paradise Lost' 327, 333, 339, 345, 351,
Th 1 of tha ... lot"
e moral of that poem, of time
contained in the action - ngth . . .369
The vast genius of Milton - - -
His poem of “Il Penseroso' - - -
His description of the archangel and the evil
spirits addressing themselves for the combat 463

417
425

Mimickry, (art of) why we delight in it - 416
Mind, (human) the wonderful nature of it - 554
Minister, a watchful one described - - 439
Minutius, his character - - - - 422
Mirth in a man ought always to be accidental 196

The awkward pretenders to it - - . 358

Distinguished from cheerfulness - - 381
Mirza, the vision of - - - 159

Mischief rather to be suffered than an inconve-
nience - -

506 || Misfortunes, our judgments upon them reproved *:
- - - 62

The foundation of community - - - - 522 || Mixt wit described - -
For what reason liable to so much ridicule 522 || Mixt communion of men and spirits in Paradise,
Further thoughts of the Spectator on that as described by Milton - ... - - - 12
subject - - - - - - - 525 | Mode, on what it ought to be built - - 6
Mars, an attendant on the spring - - - 425 || A standing mode of dress recommended - 129
Martial, an o of his on a grave man's be- Moderation a great virtue - - - 312
ing at a lewd play - - - - 446 Modesty, the chief ornament of the fair sex - 6
Masquerade, a complaint against it - - 8| In men no ways acceptable to the ladies 154
The design of it - - , , -, - - 8 || Self-denial and modesty frequently attended
Master, a good one, a prince in his family 107 with unexpected blessings . . 206
A complaint against some ill masters - 137 || Modesty, the contrary of ambition - - 206
Matter, the least part of it contains an unex- A due proportion of modesty requisite to an
hausted fund - - - - - 420 orator - - - - - - - 231
The basis of animals - - - - 519 | The excellency of it - - - - 231
is great, new, and beautiful - - 413
Needle-work recommended to ladies - - - 605
A letter from Cleorn against it - - 609
Neighbourhoods, of whom consisting - - 49

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More, (Sir Thomas) his gayety at his death, to
what owing - - - -
Mortality, the lover's bill of -
Mothers justly reproved for not nursing their
own children - - -
Motion of the gods, wherein it differs from that
of mortals according to Heliodorus
Motteux. (Peter) dedicates his poem on tea to
the Spectator
Motto, the effects of n handsome one
Mourning: the signs of true mourning generally
misunderstood -
The method of mourning considered
Who the greatest mourners
Mouse Alley Doctor - - -
Much cry but little wool, to whom applied -
Muly Moluch. Emperor of Morocco, his great
intrepidity in his dying moments

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Music, banished by Plato out of his common-
wealth - - - - - - - 18
Of a relative nature - - - - 29

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Music, (Church) of the improvement of it

It may raise confused notions of things in the
fancy - - - - - - - 416
Recommended - - - - - 630
Musician, (burlesque) an account of one - 570
NAKED shouldered - - - 437

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Necessary cause of our being pleased with what

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the more they resemble
- - 414
414

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Obedience of children to their parents the boss
of all government - - - - - 1->
Obscurity, the only defence agains reproach lo
Often more illustrious thansrat-feur - to:
Obsequiousness in behaviour considered - >
Ode (Laplander's) to his mistress - - - **
(Economy, wherein compared to good breeding lis
Ogier: the complete ogier - - - - 45
Old maids generally superstitious - - 7
Old Testament in a periwig - - - - 5S
Omniamante, her character - - - 14+

9| Opera, as it is the present entertainment esthe
English stage, considered - - - 5
The progress it has made in our theatre - is
Some account of the French opera - - >
Opinion (popular described - - - - 4o

Opportunities to be carefully avoided by the for
sex - - - - - - - Ros
Orator, what requisite to form one - - $33
Orbicilla, her character - - - 38°o
Order, necessary to be kept up in the word io

Ostentation, an inhabitant of the paraise of oxis 45*

Otway commended and censured >
His description of the miseries of law sis 45s

Overdo, a justice at Epping, offended as the

Nemesis, an old maid, a discoverer of judgments 483
New or uncommon, why every thing that is so
411

raises a pleasure in the imagination
What understood by the term with respect to
objects - - - - - 412

company of strollers for playing the part st
Clodpate, and making a mockery of one of
the quorum - - - - - 4s
Ovid, in what he excels - - - - 47
His description of the palace of Fame - 43
His verse on making love at the theatre.
translated by Mr. Dryden - - - so
How to succeed in his manner - - $48
Outrageously virtuous, what womense called SS
Oxford scholar, his great discovery in a code-
house - - - - - - +5
PAINTER and tailor often contribute more than
the poet to the success of - s
Pamphilio, a good master - - - - 137
Pamphlets, defamatory, de - - ko.

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Particles, (English) the honour done to them in
the late operas - - - - -
Parties crept much into the conversation of the
ladies - - - - -
An instance of the malice of parties -
The dismal effects of a furious party spirit 4.
It corrupts both our morals and judgment
Parties reign more in the country than town
Parly zeal very bad for the face - -
Party patches - - - -
Party scribblers reproved - - -
Party not to be followed with innocence -
Party prejudices in England - - -
Passion relieved by itsel - - - -
Passionate people their faults - - -
Nat. Lee's description of it - - -
Passions, the conquest of them a difficult task
The various operations of them - -
The strange disorders bred by our passions
when not regulated by virtue - -
It is not so much the business of religion to
extinguish, as to regulate our passions -
The use of the passions - - -
The passions treated of - - - - -
What moves them in descriptions most pleas.
ino - - - - - - -
In all men, but appear not in all - - 418
Of hope and fear - - - - - 471
The work of a philosopher to subdue the pas-
sions - - - - - - -
Instances of their power - - -
Passions of the san, a treatise for the use of the
author's scholars -
Patience, an allegorical discourse upon it
Her power - - - - - - - 559
Fo clients, a discourse on them i. #:
Worthy patrons compared to guardian ange
Paul ... a design of his - - - - 338
Peace, some ill consequences of it - - 45
Pedantic humour - " - - - - - 617
Pedants, who so to be reputed - - - 105
The book-pedant the most supportable - 105
Pedants in breeding as well as - • 286
Peepers described - - 53
Peevish fellow described - - - - 438
Penelope's web, the story of it - - - 606
Penkeshman, the comedian, his many qualifica-
tions - - - - -
• Penseroso,' (poem of) by Milton - --
People. the only riches of a country - -
Pericles, nis advice to the women - -
Persecution in religious matters immoral -
Persian children, what learnt by them in their
schools - - - - - - -
Persian soldier reproved for railing against an

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- 501

enemy - - - - - - - - - 427
Persians, their instruction of their youth 99
Their notions of parricide - - - 189
Person, the word defined by Mr. Locke . . . 578

Persons, imaginary, not proper for an heroic

poem - - - - -
Petition of John-a-Nokes and John-a-Stiles -
Petition from a cavalier for a place, with his
pretensions to it - - - - -
Petronius and Socrates, their cheerful behaviour

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His edict against duels - - - - 97
Phebe and Colin, an original poem by Dr. Byron 603
Phidias, his proposal for a statue of Alexander 415
Philautia, a great volary - - - - 79
Philips, (Mr.) pastoral verses of his - - 400
His pastorals recommended by the Spectator 528
Philopater's letter about his daughter's dancing 466
Philosophers, why longer lived than other men 195
Philosophy, the use of it - - - - -
Said to be brought by Socrates down from
heaven - - - -
The use of natural philosophy - - 393
The authors of the new only gratify and
enlarge the imagination - " - " - 4
The boast of pagan philosophers that they
exalt human nature - - - - 634
Phocion, his behaviour at his death - - 133
His notion of popular applause - - - 188
His sayings .. vain promiser - - 448
Physic, the substitute of exercise or temperance 195
Physician and Surgeon, their different employ-
ment - - - - - -
The physicians, a formidable body of men
Compared to the British army in Caesar's time
Their way of converting one distemper into
another - - - - - - -
Physiognomy every man in some degree master
of that art - - - - - -
Picts, what women so called - - -
No faith to be kept with them . . . .
Picture not so natural a representation as a
statue - - - - - - - 416
- 418

21
21

..What pleases most in one - -
Pictures, witty, what pieces so called -
#. an ornament to human nature -
ar's saying of Theron - - -
Pin-money condemned - - - -
Pinkethman to personate King Porus on an
elephant - - - - - - -
Pisistratus, the Athenian tyrant, his generous
behaviour on a particular occasion -
Pitch-pipe, the invention and use of it - -
Pittacus, a wise saying of his about riches
Fift is love softened by sorrow - - -
hat and Terror leading passions in poetry 418
The reasonableness of pity - - - 588
Place and precedency more contested amon
women of an #. rank than ladies o
quality - - - - - -
Places of trust, who most fit for them - - 469
Why courted by men of generous principles 469
The unreasonableness of party-pretences to 6

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places - . . . . . . . . .
Planets, to survey them fills us with astonish-
ment - - - - - - -
Planting recommended to countrygentlemen;83,589
Plato, his notion of the soul - - - 90
Wherein, according to him and his followers,
the punishment of a voluptuous man consists 90
His account of Socrates's behaviour the morn- 1

ing he was to die - - - -
His description of the Supreme Being - 507
His saying of labour - - - -
Players in Drury Lane, their intended regula-
tions - - - - - - - 36
Wherein to be condemned - - 502

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454. INDEX.
No.
Pleaders, few of them tolerable company - 197 A chief spring of action in most men -

Pleasant fellows to be avoided - - 462
Pleasantry, in conversation, the faults it covers 462
Pleasure, when our chief pursuit disappoints

itself - - - - 151

The deceitfulness of Pleasure - - 151
Pleasure and pain, a marriage proposed between

them. and concluded - - - - 183

Pliny, the necessary qualifications of a fine
speaker according to that author - - 484
His letter to his wife's aunt Hispulla - 525
Plutarch, for what reproved by the Spectator 483
Poems in picture - - - - - - 58
The chief things to be considered in epic poem 267
Several poems preserved for their similes 421

Poetesses. (English) wherein remarkable - 51
Poetry has the whole circle of nature for its pro-
wance - - - - - - - 419
Poets, (English) reproved - - - 39, 40
Their artifices - - - - - 44
Bad poets given to envy and detraction - 253
The chief qualification of a good poet - 314
The pains they should take to form the imagi-
nation - - - - - - - 417
Should mend Nature, and add to her beauties 418
How much they are at liberty in it - - 418
Polite imagination let into a great many plea-
sures the vulgar are not capable of - 411
Politicians, the mischief they do - - 556
Some at the Royal Exchange - - - 568
Politics of St. James's coffee-house, on the re-
oo:: of the French king's death - -
Giles's - - - - - - 403
Of Jenny Mans - - - - - - 403
Of Will's - - - - - - 403
Of the temple - - - - - - 403
Of Fish-street - - - - - 403
Of Cheapside - - - - - • 403
Of Garraway's - - - - - 403
Poll, a way of arguing - - - - - - 239
Polycarpus, a man beloved by everybody - 280
Pontignan, (Mons.) his adventure with two wo-
unen - - - - - - -
Poor, the scandalous appearance of them - 430
Pope, (Mr.) his miscellany commended by the
Spectator - - - - - - 523
Popular applause, the vanity of it - - 188
Posterity, its privilege - - - - - 101

Poverty, the inconveniences and mortifications
usually attending it - - - - 150
The loss of merit - - - - -
Powell, (senior) to act Alexander the Great on

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Printing encouraged by politesi nations in E-
rope - - - - - -
Procrastination, from whence proceeding -

Procuress, her trade - - - -

Prodicus, the first inventor of fables - -

Professions, the three great ones overburdered
with practitioners - - - - -

Projector, a short description of - -
Promisers condemned - - - - -
ro. (neglect of) through frivolous false-
ox - - - - - - -
Pronunciation necessary to an orator -
Proper. (Will, an honest tale bearer - -
Prospect, a beautiful one, de lights the soul as

much as a demonstration - - - 47?
Wide ones pleasing to the fancy - - +il
Enlivened by rivers and fails of water - 4lf
That of hills and valleys soon tires - - 4li
Prospect of peace, a poem on that subsect
o by the Spectator - - - 5-

Prosperity, to what compared by Seneca - ~~~
Proverbs the 7th chapter of turned one verse 4*
Providence demonstrative arouments or it **
*

Not to be fathomed by reason - - - *.
Prudence, the influence it has on our good or
ill-fortune in the world - - -
Psalm 114th translated - - - - - **

Psalmist against hypocrisy - - - 3-
Of Providence - - - - - - 441
Punch, out in the moral part - - - 14
Punchinello (requented more than the church 14
Punishments in schools disapproved - - 1.5-
Punning recommended by the practice of
ages - - - - - - - £1.
In what age the pun chiefly flourished - fol
A famous university much infessed with it fi
Why banished at present out of the learned
world - - - - - - - fi
The definition of a pun - - - - Fl
Whose privilege - - - - - sos

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An essay against quacks by Dr. Z. Peorce - 57
Quakers, project of an act to marry them to the
olive beauties - - -
Qualities, what are truly valuable - - 343
Quality no exemption from reproof - - 34
Is either of fortune, body, or mind - - $13
Queries in love answered - - - - to
Question, a curious one started by a so-an
about the choice of present and future tap-
piness and misery - - - 5-3
Quidnunc, (Thos) his letters to the Spects or
about news - - - - - t-s
Quir. (Peter de) his letter to the Spectator about

:

puns - - - - - - -
Quixotie, (Don) patron of the Sighers' Club

RARELAIS. his devire - - - -
Rack, a knotty syllogism - - - -
Raillery in conversation, the absurdity of it
Rainbow. the figure of one contributes to *s

magnificence as much as the cours to its
beauty - - - - - -
Rake, a character of one - - - 5 s

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Rattling Club, got into the church - - 630
Read, (Sir William) his operations on the eyes 472
Readers divided by the Spectator into the mer-
curial and saturnine - - - - 179
Reason, instead of governing passion is often
subservient to it - - - - -
Not to be found in brutes - - - -
The pilot of the passions - - -
A pretty nice proportion between that and

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408
passion - - - - - - 408
Rebus, a kind of false wit among the ancients 59
And our own countrymen -, - - 59
A rebus at Blenheim-house condemned - 59
Recitative, (Italian) not agreeable to an Eng-
lish audience - - - - - 29
Recitative music in every ought to be
adapted to the accent of the uage - 29
Recreation, the necessity of it. - - -
Religion, the greatest incentive to good and
worthy actions - - - - - 316
Considered - - - - - - 459
A morose melancholy behaviour, which is ob-
served in several precise professors of reli-
gion, reproved by the Spectator - - , 494
The fe spirit of composes and cheers the 4
soul - - - - - - - -
Renatus Valentinus, his father and grandfather,
their sto - - - - - -
Rentfree, on, her letter about the green
sickness - - - - - - 431
Repository for sashions, a building proposed and
described - - - - - - 487
The usefulness of it - - - - - 487
Reproof, when justly deserved, how we ought
to behave under it - - - - -

Reputation a species of fame - - - 218 ‘Scornful lady," Spectator's observations at that
he stability of it, if well founded -, - 218 play . . . . . . . . - - - - - 270

Retirement, the pleasure of it where truly en- Scot, (Dr.) his christian life, its merits - • 447
- - - - - - - - 4 || Scotch, a saying of theirs - - - - 463

Jo
A o of it - - - - - - 425
Revelation, what light it gives to the joys of
heaven - - - - - -
Revenge of a Spanish lady on a man who boasted
of‘. favours - - - - - 611
Rhubarb, (John, Esq.) his memorial from the
country infirmary - - - -
Rich, (Mr.) would not suffer the opera of Whit.
tington's cat to be performed in his house,
and the reason for it - - - -
Rich: to be rich, the way to please - - 280
The advantages of riches - - - - 283

The art of growing rich - - - - 283
The proper use of riches -, -, - - 294
The }. of rich men overlooked - 464
Richlieu, (Cardinal) his politics made France
the terror of Europe - - - - 305
Riches corrupt men's morals - - - 464

Ridicule, the talent of ungenerous tempers 245
Ridicule, the two great branches of, in writing 249
Put to a good use - - - - - 445
Riding, a healthy exercise - - - - - 115
Riding-dress of ladies, the extravagance of it 435
Rival mother, the first part of her history - 91
Robin, the porter at Will's coffee-house, his
qualification - - - - - -

429 || Self denial, the rent fundation of civil virtue 248

No
Roman and Sabine ladies, their example recom-
mended to the British - - - - -
Romans, an instance of the general good under-
standing of the ancient Romans - - 502
Rosalinda, a famous whig partisan, her misfor-
tune - - - - - - - 81
Rosicrucius, the story of his sepulchre - 379
A o discovery made by a Rosicrucian 574
Rowley, (Mr.) his proposals for a new pair of
lobes - - - - - - - 552
Roy: Exchange, the great resort to it - 69
‘Royal Progress,' a poem - - - - 620
Rusticity shocking - - - - - 400
Rusty, (Scabbard) his letter to the Spectator 449
Rynsault, the unjust governor, in what manner
ol. by Charles, Duke of Burgundy,
is sovereign - - - - - - 491
SAINT Paul's eloquence - - - - 633
Salamanders, an order of ladies described - 198
Sallust, his excellence - - - - - 400
Salmon, (Mrs.) her ingenuity - - - 28
Salutation subject to great enormities - - 259
Salutations in churches censured - - 460
Sanctorius, his invention - - - - 25
Santer, (Mrs.) a great snuff-taker - - 344
Sappho, an excellent poetess - - - 223
ies for love of Phaon - - - - 223
Her hymn to Venus - -, - . . . . .223
A . of Sappho's translated into three
different languages - - - - - 229
Satire, ‘Whole Duty of Man, turned into one 568
Satires, English ribaldry and Billingsgate - 451
Panegyrical on ourselves - - - 473
Satirists best instruct us in the manners of their
respective times - - - - -
Scandal, to whom most pleasing - - - 426
How monstrous it renders us - - - 451
Scales, (golden) a dream of them - - - 460
Scaramouch an expedient of his at Paris - 223
Scarfs, the vanity of some clergymen's wear.
ing them - - - - - - - 609
Scholar's egg, what so called - - - 58
Schoolmasters, the ignorance and want of dis-
cernment in the generality of them 157,168,313
Schoolmen their ass case - - - - 191
How applied - ... - - - - 191
Scipio, his judgment of Marius when a boy 157

Scribblers against Spectator, why neglected by
him - - - - - - - 445
The most offensive - - - - - 582
Seasons, a dream of them - - - -
Self conceit, an inhabitant of the paradise of

fools -

Self love transplanted, what - - - 129
The narrowness and danger of self love 588
Semanthe, her character - - - - 404
Semiramis, her prodigious works and powers 415
Sempronia, a professed admirer of the French
nation - - - - - - - 45
The match maker - - - - - 437
Seneca, his saying of drunkenness - - 569
Sense: some men of more despicable than beg-

ars - - - - - -
T. different degrees of sense in the several
different species of animals - - - 519
song. (Captain) a member of the Spectator's
club, his character - - - -

His account of a soldier's life - - - 152
His discourse with a young wrangler in the
law - - - - -

He receives a letter from Ipswich, giving an
account of an engagement between a

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