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WRIGHT, PRINTER, ST. JOHN'S SQUARE.

OBSERVER.

NUMBER CIX.

Ουδέν γας ούτως ήδύ ανθρώποις έφυ
Ως το λαλέειν τ' αλλότρια,

MENANDEK.
Still to be tattling, still to prate,

No luxury in life so great. The humours and characters of a populous county town at a distance from the capital, furnish matter of much amusement to a curious observer, I have now been some weeks resident in a place of this de. scription, where I have been continually treated with the private lives and little scandalizing anecdotes of almost every person of any note in it. Having passed most of my days in the capital, I could not but remark the striking difference between it and these subordinate capitals in this particular: in London we are in the habit of looking to our own affairs, and caring little about those, with whom we have no dealings : here every body's business seems to be no less his neighbour's concerns than his own: a set of tattling gossips (including all the idlers in the place, male as well as female) seem to have no other employment for their time or tongue, but to run from house to house, and circulate their silly stories up and down. A few of these contemptible impertinents I shall now describe.

Miss Penelope Tabby is an antiquated maiden of at lcast forty years standing, a great observer of dc. corum, and particularly hurt by the behaviour of

VOL. XL.

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two young ladies, who are her next door neigh. hours, for a custom they have of lolling out of their windows and talking to fellows in the street: the charge cannot be denied, for it is certainly a practice, these young ladies indulge themselves in very freely ; but on the other hand it must be owned Miss Pen Tabby is also in the habit of lolling out of her window at the same time to stare at them, and put them to shame for the levity of their conduct: they have also the crime proved upon them of being unpardonably handsome, and this they nei. ther can nor will attempt to contradićt. Miss Pen Tabby is extremely regular at morning prayers, but she complains heavily of a young staring fellow in the pew next to her own, who violates the solemnity of the service by ogling her at her devotions : he has a way of leaning over the pew, and dangling a white hand ornamented with a tiaming paste-ring, which sometimes plays the lights in her eyes, so as to make them water with the reflection, and Miss Pen has this very natural remark ever ready on the occasion-Such things, you know, are apt to take off one's attention.'

Another of this illustrious junto is Billy Bachelor, an old unmarried petit-maitre: Billy is a courtier of ancient standing; he abounds in anecdotes not of the freshest date, nor altogether of the most interesting sort; for he will tell you how such and such a lady was dressed, when he had the honour of handing her into the drawing-room : he has a court-atalantis of his own, from which he can favour you with some hints of sly doings amongst the maids of honour, particularly of a certain dubious duchess now deceased, (for he names no names) who appeared at a certain masquerade in puris naturalibus, and other valuable discoveries, which all the world has long ago known, and long ago been tired of. Billy has a oved his friend, had no quarrel with his bottle, and, coming from his club one night a little flustered, his horrid dalliances threw Mrs. Dainty into strong hysterics, and the covenanted truce being now broken, she kept no further terms with him, and they separated. It was a step of absolute necessity, for she declares her life could no otherwise have been saved; his boisterous familiarities would have been her death. She now leads an uncontaminated life, supporting a feeble frame by medicine, sipping her tea with her dear quiet friends, every evening, chatting over the little news of the day, sighing charitably when she hears any evil of her kind neighbours, turning off her femme-de-chambre once a week or thereabouts, fondling her lap-dog, who is a dcar sweet pretty creature, and so sensible, and taking the air now and then on a pillion behind faithful John, who is so careful of her and so handy, and at the same time one of the stoutest, handsomest, best-limbed lads in all England.

Sir Hugo Fitz-Hugo is a decayed baronet of a family so very ancient, that they have long since worn out the estate that supported them : Sir Hugo knows his own dignity none the less, and keeps a little snivelling boy, who can scarce move under the load of worsted lace, that is plaistered down the edges and seams of his livery : he leaves a visiting card at your door, stuck as full of emblems as an American paper dollar. Sir Hugo abominates a tradesman; his olfactory nerves are tortured with the scent of a grocer, or a butcher quite across the way, and as for a tallow-chandler he can wind him to the very end of the street; these are people, whose visits he cannot endure; their very bills turn his stomach upside down. Sir Hugo inveighs against modern manners as severely as Cato would against French cookery; he notes down omissions

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No.

125. Fragment of Hermesianax of Colophon, addressed to

his mistress Leontium, describing the amours of the

Greek poets. Of the seven wise men. Of the ca-

lendar of the Greeks and other nations. Of Thales.

A letter from Pherecydes to that philosopher.

126. Of the origin and introduction of the drama. Of

Thespis's pretensions to be considered as the father

of tragedy.

127. Of the nature and character of the first drama.

128. Athenian history resumed, and continued from the

death of Pisistratus to that of Hipparchus.

129. The same continued, to the expulsion of Hippias.

130. Concluded with the battle of Marathon.

131. The subject of the drama resumed. Of the old tragic

poets Pratinas and Phrynichus.

132. Of the poet Æschylus.

133. Of Æschylus as compared with Sophocles and Euri-

pides.

134. Of the tragedies of Æschylus.

135. Of the Greek comedy. Of Aristotle's definition and

chronology of the first comedy. Of Epicharmus,

considered as the first writer of comedy.

136. Fragments of Epicharmus. Account of Phormis,

Chionides, Magnes, and Dinolochus, the founders

of comedy.

137. Of Cratinas and his comedy in reply to the satire of

Aristophanes. Of Eupolis; his fragments compared

with certain passages in Ben Jonson.

138. Of Aristophanes ; his history, character, and works.

139. Aristophanes defended from the criticisms of Plutarch,

also from the account which Ælian gives of his

attack upon Socrates.

140. The motives and grounds for Aristophanes's attack

upon Socrates more fully considered, with some

anecdotes of that philosopher's school and private

character. The dates of the eleven surviving plays

of Aristophanes ascertained.

141. Of the remaining writers of the old comedy ; viz.

Amipsias, Plato, Crates, Phrynichus, Pherecrates,

Amphis, Hermippus, Hipparchus, Philonides, and

Theopompus, with their fragments translated.

142. Of the middle comedy of the Greeks. Anecdotes of

Alexis : fragments of that dramatic poet collected.

143. The same collection continued and concluded. Anec.

dotes of Antiphanes.

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