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of said M. E. Jimenez, payable out of the Contingent Fund of the Assembly

Adopted.
By Mr. De Haven:

Mr. SPEAKER: The Committee on Mileage, to whom was referred the accounts of witnesses summoned to appear before the Committee on Public Puildings and Grounds in the matter of the alleged frauds in the construction of the State Capitol building, report the following amounts, viz:

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Also, the account of L. H. Garrigus, for experting books, fifty dollars, and recommend the passage of the following resolution:

Resolved, That the State Controller be and he is hereby directed to draw his warrants on the Contingent Fund of the Assembly for the above amounts, and that the State Treasurer is required to pay the

same.

DE HAVEN, Chairman.

On the adoption of the resolution, the ayes and noes were called, with the following result:

AYES—Messrs. Andrews, Bacon, Barker, Barklage, Bayley, Berry, Bradley, Bockius, Center, Connolly, Cooper, Freeman, French, Goodall, Gray, Harvey, Henshaw, Hopper, Johnston, Meeker, Mott of Los Angeles, Mott of Sacramento, McCullough, Pardee, Russ, Sargent of San Joaquin, Schrack, Sensabaugh, Splivalo, Stillwagon, Tinnin, Turner, Walker, Wheaton, Whiting, Wilcox, and Mr. Speaker-36.

Noes—Messrs. Aldrich, Baird, Bell, Brown, Burckhalter, Caldwell, Chalmers, Coleman, Dannals, Days, Eagan, Edgar, Everett, Franck, Galloway, Gibson, Hayes, James, Jost, Lee, Little, Long, Rector, Reed, Rice, Sammons, Sargent of Santa Clara, Seibe, Slaughter, Spencer, Welty, Whitney, and Woodward—32.

On the passage of the bill, the ayes and noes were demanded by Messrs. Coleman, Baird, and Jost, with the following result:

Ayes—Messrs. Aldrich, Andrews, Bacon, Barker, Barnes, Berry, Connolly, Cooper, French, Galloway, Gibson, Goodall, Gray, Harvey, Henshaw, James, Johnston, Lee, Little, Meeker, Mott of Sacramento, McCullough, Reed, Russ, Sargent of Santa Clara, Schrack, Seibe, Sensabaugh, Splivalo, Stillwagon, Tinnin, Walker, Welty, Whiting, Wilcox, and Mr. Speaker-36.

Noes--Messrs. Baird, Barklage, Bayley, Bell, Bradley, Bockius, Brown, Burckhalter, Caldwell, Center, Chalmers, Coleman, Dannals, Days, Eagan, Edgar, Everett, Franck, Freeman, Hayes, Hopper, Jost, Long, Mott of Los Angeles, Munday, Pardee, Rector, Rice, Sammons, Sargent of San Joaquin, Slaughter, Spencer, Turner, Ward, Whitney, Woodward, and Wright-37.

Mr. Mott of Sacramento moved a suspension of the rules to take up Senate Bill No. 70—An Act to provide additional grounds for the State Capitol building, in the City of Sacramento.

Mr. Berry moved to lay the bill on the table..

On which the ayes and noes were demanded by Messrs. Wilcox, Andrews, and Bayley, the House refusing to so order by the following vote:

Ayes—Messrs. Aldrich, Andrews, Baird, Barker, Barklage, Berry, Bockius, Coleman, Crane, Days, Edgar, Everett, Franck, Freeman, Gibson, Goodall, Lee, Little, Rector, Sammons, Sargent of San Joaquin, Seibe, Sensabaugh, Tinnin, Turner, Walker, Ward, Wheaton, Whitney, and Woodward—30:

Noes—Messrs. Bacon, Bayley, Bell, Brown, Burckhalter, Caldwell, Center, Chalmers, Cooper, Dannals, De Haven, Eagan, French, Harvey, Hayes, Henshaw, Hopper, James, Johnston, Jost, Long, Luttrell, Meeker, Mott of Sacramento, McCullough, Pardee, Reed, Rice, Russ, Sargent of Santa Clara, Schrack, Slaughter, Stillwagon, Welty, Whiting, Wilcox, and Mr. Speaker-38.

Mr. Barker moved the indefinite postponement of the bill.
Mr. Wilcox moved the previous question.

On ordering the same, the ayes and noes were demanded by Messrs. Bayley, Whiting, and Sargent of San Joaquin, and the demand was sustained by the following vote:

AYES-Messrs. Bacon, Bayley, Bell, Caldwell, Center, Chalmers, Connolly, De Haven, Eagan, French, Galloway, Gibson, Gray, Harvey, Henshaw, Hopper, James, Johnston, Jost, Meeker, Mott of Sacramento, Munday, McCullough, Pardee, Reed, Rice, Russ, Sargent of Santa Clara, Schrack, Sensabaugh, Slaughter, Spencer, Stillwagon, Welty, Whiting, Wilcox, and Mr. Speaker-37.

Noes-Messrs. Aldrich, Andrews, Baird, Barker, Barklage, Berry, Bockius, Brown, Coleman, Cooper, Crane, Dannals, Days, Edgar, Everett, Franck, Freeman, Goodall, Lee, Little, Long, Rector, Sammons, Sargent of San Joaquin, Seibe, Splivalo, Tinnin, Turner, Walker, Ward, Wheaton, Whitney, Woodward, and Wright_34.

On the indefinite postponement of the bill the ayes and noes were demanded by Messrs. Wilcox, Andrews, and Bayley, and the motion was lost by the following vote:

Ayes-Messrs. Aldrich, Andrews, Baird, Barker, Barklage, Berry, Bockius, Coleman, Crane, Days, Edgar, Everett, Franck, Freeman, Goodall, Lee, Little, Rector, Sammons, Sargent of San Joaquin, Seibe, Tinnin, Turner, Walker, Wheaton, Whitney, Woodward, and Wright—28.

Noes-Messrs. Bacon, Bayley, Bell, Brown, Burckhalter, Center, Chalmers, Connolly, Cooper, Dannals, De Haven, Eagan, French, Galloway, Gibson, Gray, Harvey, Henshaw, Hopper, James, Johnston, Jost, Meeker, Mott of Sacramento, Munday, McCullough, Pardee, Reed, Rice, Russ, Sargent of Santa Clara, Sebrack, Slaughter, Spencer, Splivalo, Stillwagon, Welty, Whiting, Wilcox, and Mr. Speaker–40.

On the passage of the bill the ayes and noes were again demanded by Messrs. Berry, Andrews, and Woodward, with the following result:

Aves—Messrs. Bacon, Bayley, Bell, Bockius, Brown, Burckhalter, Center, Chalmers, Cooper, Danvals, De Haven, Eagan, French, Galloway, Gibson, Gray, Harvey, Hopper, James, Johnston, Jost, Long, Meeker, Mott of Sacramento, Munday, McCullough, Pardee, Reed, Rice, Russ, Sargent of Santa Clara, Schrack, Spencer, Stillwagon, Welty, Whiting, Wilcox, and Mr. Speaker-38.

Noes-Messrs. Aldrich, Andrews, Baird, Barker, Barklage, Berry, Coleman, Crane, Days, Edgar, Everett, Franck, Freeman, Goodall, Henshaw, Lee, Little, Rector, Sammons, Sargent of San Joaquin, Seibe, Slaughter, Tinnin, Turner, Walker, Ward, Wheaton, Whitney, Woodward, and Wright-30.

And so the bill passed.

REPORT.

Mr. Gibson made the following report:

Mr. SPEAKER: Your Committee on Enrollment beg leave to report that they bave examined and find correctly enrolled Assembly Bill No. 746An Act to provide for the better protection of certain lands in San Joaquin County from overflow—and that the same bas, this first day of April, eighteen hundred and seventy-two, at eleven o'clock, been transmitted to the Governor for his approval.

GIBSON, Chairman. By Mr. Hayes:

Mr. SPEAKER: Your Committee on Enrollment beg leave to report that they have examined and found correctly enrolled Assembly Bill No. 567—An Act to authorize the inhabitants on the Mormon Slough, in San Joaquin County, to form a reclamation district, and collect taxes therein.

Also, Assembly Bill No. 768—An Act to quiet title to certain lands in the County of Yolo.

Also, Assembly Bill No. 755—An Act to provide for the payment of interest on Trustees' orders against certain swamp land districts.

And that the same have, this first day of April, eighteen hundred and seventy-two, at eight o'clock and twenty minutes P. M., been transmitted to the Governor for his approval.

HAYES, for Committee. By Mr. Gibson:

Mr. SPEAKER: Your Committee on Enrollment beg leave to report that they have examined and found correctly enrolled Assembly Bill No. 143-An Act to amend an Act providing for the appointment of additional Notaries Public in Sacramento County, approved April fourth, eighteen hundred and seventy-and that the same has, this first day of April, eighteen hundred and seventy-two, at ten o'clock and forty-five minutes, been transmitted to the Governor for his approval.

GIBSON, Chairman.

By Mr. Barker:

Mr. SPEAKER: Your Committee on Enrollment beg leave to report that they have examined and found correctly enrolled Assembly Bill No. 652—An Act to provide funds for the further reclamation of Swamp Land Districts Numbers Fifty and Fifty-four, in Sacramento Countyand that the same has, this first day of April, eighteen hundred and seventy-two, at eleven o'clock, been transmitted to the Governor for his approval.

BARKER, for Committee.

On motion of Mr. Wilcox, the House took a recess for ten minutes to prepare for the interesting ceremonies about to ensue,

PRESENTATIONS,

On coming to order, Mr. Wilcox approached the desk, and standing before a magnificent silver tea service, placed thereon, thus addressed the Speaker:

Of all the pleasing duties which I have been called upon to perform during the present session of the Legislature, I am now assigned the discharge of one, of all the most agreeable and delightful. We are now upon the eve of closing what is perhaps the most eventful session that has ever been held in this State. Whatever of good or of bad we may have done passes with this night into the history of the legislation of our State, and it is to be hoped that the good has exceeded the bad. At any rate, I can say for myself—and I believe I speak the sentiments of almost every member on this floor when I say that which I now pro. pose to do—I believe the members of this nineteenth session of the California Legislature have striven with all their ability, and with unimpeachable honesty, to advance the public interests and to direct our legislation for the public good. I say, then, gentlemen, that among all the pleasing duties which I have been called upon to perform here, the most satisfactory one of all is presenting, in the name of the Assembly of the Legislature of this State, to him who we have elected to the high, honorable, and important position of presiding officer, a token of our profound esteem and regard for the manner in which he has discharged the arduous duties of his station. I say it is an exceedingly great pleasure for me to perform this duty. I as a Democrat; I as one of the minority, and a small minority at that, declare that it is a pleasure to me emphatically to give my voice on this occasion in complimentary testimonial to the man whom the majority elected to be our presiding officer, and to dictate such rules and regulations as he deemed best for our government. And now, on behalf of all the members of this Assembly, Democratic as well as Republican—but more especially on the part of the members of the Democratic party, the minority, who have received at your hands so many courtesies—in the name of the representatives of the people in this body at the nineteenth session of the

Legislature, permit me, Mr. Speaker, to present to you this elegant set of silver, as a small testimonial of their appreciation of the firmness and kindness with which you have discharged the duties of your position. And now, on the eve of our disbanding, to meet no more together in this worlí, perchance—for the probabilities are that this Assembly will never meet together again-let me, in their name, present to you their kindest regards, and their hope for your future welfare and prosperity.

Mr. Shannon made the following

RESPONSE:

Gentlemen of the Assembly:

I shall imitate somewhat my distinguished friend, Mr. Wilcox of Mariposa, in his opening remarks, when he referred to the fact that it was one of the most pleasant duties of the session to be able as an exponent of the wishes and sentiments and feelings of members toward myself. This, to me, is one of the most agreeable and pleasant occasions of the session, when I believe that each member of this House sincerely and honestly entertains for me as their presiding officer those feelings and sentiments which have been so ably and eloquently expressed by the gentleman from Mariposa. It is, therefore, to me the most gratifying portion of the proceedings of this Assembly. And as a token of those feelings and opinions, I accept in the spirit in which it is offered, this magnificent gift from your hands as a token or manifestation of the honest convictions of each and every member of the House. You will pardon the egotism in my saying this, for I believe it to be true, that through all the administration as presiding officer, I have aimed to do impartial justice. I may not on all occasions have succeeded, but on any occasion of failure, it was an error of the head and not of the heart. I went into this chair upon the commencement of this session with a full determination that I would enforce the rules rigidly and impartially, and treat all members upon principles of broad equality. Whether I have succeeded or not is for you to determine. I therefore accept this present—this magnificent present—as a token of your regard and of your appreciation. Had I the language to express the real gratitude that prompts me to say this, I should no doubt make you all feel that I entirely realize and appreciate this great compliment that you have bestowed upon me.

TO MARCUS D. BORUCK.

Mr. Gray then approached the lower end of the desk, whereon were another silver tea set and costly silver tankard, and thus addressed the Chief Clerk:

Just four months ago we came to this place strangers, from all localities, from various localities, and each deeming the wants of his own county paramount and far ahead of those of any other place. All were somewhat selfishly disposed; and yet every one was zealous to serve the State faithfully. Our term of service is about to expire. We are about to retire to our homes; and it is very proper just now to briefly revert or glance at our record. We can congratulate ourselves upon the harmony with which this body bas been characterized. And while we, upon this floor, have differed among ourselves, yet when the question has been

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