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(6) What is the Int. of $1500, for 63 days, at 5 per cent.

Ans. 12.94. (7) What is the Int. of $234.16, for 33 days, at 7 per cent.

Ans. $1.48. (8) What is the Int. of $468.32, for 63 days, at 7 per cent. .

Ans. $5.66 nearly. (9) What is the Int. of $400 for 93 days, at 7 per cent. a year?

Ans. $7.10. (10) What is the Int. of $400 for 123 'days, at 7

per

cent. a year?

Ans. 9.43. (11) A lent B money for 5 years, at 6 per cent. a year, and in the end received $2470;what was the sum lent?

Ans. $1900. (12) B lent D £300 for 5 years, and received $450, what was the rate per cent?

Ans. 10. (13). In what time will $500 double, at 8 per cent. a year?

Ans. 12 1-2 years. FALSE SYNTAX.-LESSON 44. Rule 10. The pronoun in the possessive case, is governed by the thing possessed, either expressed or implied; as, one's friends seldom interfere.

One should know ones own mind. This senteuce is faulty, because the pronoun, ones, implies possession, and is governed by the noun mind, yet it has no sign of the possessive case, in violation of Rule 10th, therefore, the 8 should be set off by an apostrophe. Thus:---One should know one's own mind.

One is apt to love one's self. This man's boy heard the report, but anothers brought the news. One does not like to have ones hand tied, nor ones heart broke. Obs. One and other or another, are the only possessive pro

All nouns that require the sign of the apostrophe with the s. The others, however, are subject to the same government.

We have done their work, but we cannot do the others work, nor anothers work. Ones own work might suffice.

QUESTIONS ON THE TWENTY-EIGHTH CHAPTER.

READING EXERCISES.

Lesson 2. What is a series? How many kinds? How distinguished? What is a simple series? Give the first rule for reading it, and apply the examples. What of the first observation? Illustrate by example. Second rule and example? Second observation and example? What of the note?

Lesson 6. What of rule third? Example? Observation? Example? What of rule fourth? Example? Observation? Example?

Lesson 10. What a compound series? First rule? Example? Observation? Example? Apply the rule to the poetic extracts.

Lesson 14. What of the second rule? Apply the rule to the example, and explain. - Lesson 18. What of the series of serieses? What the rule for reading it? Apply the several examples.

Lesson 22. What of the note? What of rule first? Example? Observation first? Example? Observation second? Exaniple.

Lesson 26. What of rule second? Example? What of the observation? Examples?

Lesson 30. What of rule third? What examples? Observation first? Examples? Observation second? Examples?

Lesson 34, What is the rule for applying the inflections to the exclamation point? What examples? What of the note?

Lesson 38. What is the rule for applying the inflections to the parenthesis? Examples? What of observation first? Examples? Observation second? Examples?

Lesson 42. Who first attempted the inflections? Who wrote on the subject in this country? Why are both defective? Toward what do those theories tend? Why pernicious in a free government? How are these rules designed to be more useful to the ordinary pupil?

Arithmetical Exercises. Lesson 3. What is Interest? How many and what particulars refer to it? What is principal? -What time? What rate per cent. per annum? What the amount? How is the subject divided? What is simple interest? What is the first case? What is the rule? What the examples? What of the observation? Examples?

Lesson 7. Case second? Rule, first step? Second step? Examples? What of the note? What of the observation? Examples? .

Lesson 11. Case third? Rule? Examples? Observation? Examples?

Lesson 15. What of the first note? Rule? First step? Second step? Examples? Note second? Examples? Note third? Examples?

Lesson 19. Case fourth? Rule? Example? Note first? Examples? Note second? Example?

Lesson 23. Case fifth? Rule? First step? Second step? Examples? Note first? Examples? Note second?

Lesson 27. Case sixth? Rule? First step? Second step? Example? Observation? Example? ,

Lesson 31. Case seventh? Rule? First step? Second step? Example? Case eighth? Rule? First step? Second step? Example? Case ninth? Rule? Example?

Lesson 35. What is a partial payment? Rule? First step? Second step? Third step? Fourth step? Fifth step? Example? Note?

Lesson 39. What are accts. current? Rule? First step? . Second step? Third step? Fourth step? Example? The use of the table.

Grammatical Exercises. Lesson 4. What is Syntax? How many and what sentences? What is a simple sentence? What a compound sentence? What the parts of a simple sentence? What the other parts? Examples? Explain them? What 'of note 1st? What of note 2d?

Lesson 8. What is meant by False Syntax? What the 1st rule? Example? What the faulty sentence?

Note. The pupil will be required to parse the sentence when corrected, or such parts of it as will show that he fully understands the relation and dependance of the parts.

Lesson 12. Rule 2d ? Example and illustration? The faulty and corrected? Obs. lst? Example? Obs. 2d? Example? Obs. 3d? Example?!

Lesson 16. Rule 3d? Example? The faulty sentence?

Lesson 20. Rule 4th? Example? Obs. 1st? Example? Obs. 2d? Example?

Lesson 24. Rule 5th? Example? Obs. 1st? Example? Obs. 2d? Example?

Lesson 28. Rule 6th? Example? Obs.? Example?

Lesson 32. Rule 7th? Example? Obs. Ist? Example? Obs. 2d? Example? : · Lesson 36. Rule 8th? Example? Obs. Ist? Example? Obs. 2d? Example?

Lesson 40. Rule 9th? Example? Obs. Ist? Example? Obs. 2d? Example? Obs. 3d? Example? Obs. 4th? Example? .

Lesson 44. Rule 10th? Examples and illustrational Obs.? Examples and illustrations?

CHAPTER 29.

SPELLING.--LESSON 1.

bis * )-ry

Easy words of three syllables, two columns, one exhibiting the spelling and the other the pronunciation, accent on the first,

vowels short. big-ot-ed big gut-ẹd dys-pep-sy dis'pěp-sē big-ot ry big gut-re flip-an-cy flip'pă n-se bil-low-y bilʻlő-ē

frip-per-y frip pěr-ė bip-e-dal bip'pē-da) friv-o-lous friv'ö-lus bus-i-ly biz'e-lē grid-i-ron grid'i-úrn brill-ian-cy bril'yăn-sē hid-e-ous hid'ê-ús chem-is-try kem'is-trē hin-der-ance hin'dūr-ěnse chiv-al-ry shỉy-ăl-re

his'tūr-e chris-ten-dom kris's'n-dūm hith-er-to hithur-tô chrys-a-lis kris'să-lis hyp-o-crite hip’po-krit chrys-o-lite kris'o-lite id-i-om

id'ê-um cic-a-trice sik'ā-trise id-i-ot

id'ê-út cil-ia-ry sil'yă-rē ig-no-rance ig'no-rănse cin-na-bar sin'nă-bar im-i-tate im'i-tåte cin-na-mon sin'na-mún im-pi-ous

im'pē-us cit-a-del sit'ă-děl in-ci-dence in' sē-dense cit-i-zen sit'ē-z'n in-con-dite in'kõn-dite civ-il-lize siy'il-ize in-di-gence in'dē-jense crim-i-nal krim'ē-nål

in-di-go

in'de-go crit-i-cise krit'é-size in-dus-try

în'dūs-trē crys-tal-line kris'tăl-line in-fan-try

in'făn-tre crys-tal ize kris'tăl-ize in-fer-ence in'fēr-ěnse cyl-in-der sil'in-dūr in-fi-del in'fe-děl dif-fer-ence dif fŭr-ense in-fi-nite in'fē-nit dig-ni-fy dig'ne.fi in-flu-ence în-Alū-ěnse dil-i-gence dil'ē-gěnse

in-no-cence in'no-sense dil-u-ent dil'lū-ěnt

in-so-lence în'ső-lense diin-i-ty dim'e-tě in-stant-ly In'stănt-le dis-ci-pline dis'se-plin in-sti-gate in'sti-gate dis-cre-pance diskrë-pănse in-su-lar in'shū-lăc

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Application of the inflections to select sentences, There is nothing honourable', but what is innocent'; and nothing mean, but that which attaches guilt'.

How cheap', and easy', is the service of virtue'! and how dearl and difficult', are the wages of vice'!.

The temperate man's pleasures are durable', because they are regular'; and his life is calm and serene', because it is innocent.

Not to return one good deed for another', is extremely ungenerous"; but to return evilfor good', is worse than barbarous'.

When candid expressions of gratitude' drop from the lips of a poor man', they are pledges of what his generosity would be were he a rich man'.

As, among wise men', he is wisest who feels that he knows the least', so', among fools', he is the greatest who thinks he knows most'.

Virtue is the friend of life'; the soul of health'; the poor man's comfort, and the rich man's wealth'.

Fancy generally paints pleasures at a distance in beautiful colours'; but possession as generally robs them of their gloss!

That friendship which makes the least noise', is usually the most useful'; and a prudent friend', is generally more serviceable than a zealous one!

It is imprudent to expect too much happiness in this life', for no station is exempt from trouble'; the most virtuous are; undoubtedly, the most happy': but they too have their trials' and their disappointments'

How greatly do the kind offices of an affectionate child, gladen the heart of an aged parent'.-But how sharper than a serpent's sting it is to have a graceless child

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