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Natural historians observe' (for while I am in the country I must bring my allusions thence') that only male birds have voices.'

I had letters with me', (here I felt in my pockets,') "vhich spoke the king's mind on the subject.'

Know you not brethren,' (for I speak to them that know the law,') how that the law has dominion over a man as long as he lives!'

Obs. 1. The incidental phrase, or member, which often, breaks the connexion of a sentence, is of the nature of a parenthesis and adopts the same inflections.

The minister's talents,' formed for great enterprise, could not avoid rendering him conspicuous.

Thus,' then,' said he, since you are so urgent,' it is thus that I conceive it.' The sovereign good is that, the possession of which renders us happy.' And how, said I, do we possess it?' Is it sensual' or intellectual?' There,' said hie, you are entering upon the detail.'

Obs. 2. When the parenthetic member is connected with higher pointing, such as the semicolon, colon, dash, de. it is then accompanied with the falling inflection.

By means of the atmosphere,' we enjoy the sun's light, (this light is reflected from the aerial particles; ') without which, in every part of the heavens, except that in which the sun, appears for the time being, the stars and planets would be visible at noon day.

Obs. 3. The parenthetic member, should be read in a ir. pressed voice and hurried movement.

SIMPLE INTEREST ON ACCOUNTS CURRENT.LESSON 39.

RULE 1. Find the time from the entry of the charges, respectively, to the time of closing the account.

2. Multiply the amount of each charge by its respective time.

3. Multiply the amount of the several products by the given rate.

4. Divide the difference of the amounts of the scveral products multiplied by the rate, by 36500, the quotient will be the Int. Thus:--

Feb.7,

(1) A sold goods to B and charged Int. at 6 per cent. per annum, and allowed the same for all surplussages of payments. 1826.

1826. Jan. 3, Sund. pr. bill $264.15 Re’d. April 16 Cash $200 do. 147.18 do.

June 20 do. 200 April 16, do.

350.12 do. Aug. 14 do. 200 June 20, do.

110.00 do. Oct. 19 do. 200 This account was closed 2d of April 1827. $264.15 X 435=114904.25 $200x351=70200 147.18 X 408= 60049.44 200 X 286=57200 350.12 X 351=122392.12 200 X 231=46200 110 X 286 = 31460 200 X 165=33000

329305.81

206600 329305.81--206600=122705.91 X.06=7362.3486 :-36500= $20.116 Int. due A. Amount of A's acct. $871.45

Int. 20.116

891.566 Amount of B's payments 800

Balance due A $91.566 1 TABLE, showing the number of Days from any day of one month, to the same day of any other month.

FROM ANY DAY OF Jan. [Feb. Mar Apz. May June July Aug. Sept|Oct. Nov Dec. Jan. 365 334 306 275 245/ 214 184 153 122 92 61 31 Feb.

31 365 337 306276 245 215 184 153) 123 92 62 Mar.

59 28 365 334 304 273 243 212 181 151 120 90 Apl. 90 59 31 365 335/ 304 274 243 2121 182 151 121 May | 120 89 61 30) 365334 304 273 242 212 181 151 June 151 120 92 61 31 365 335 3041 273 243 212 182 July 181/ 150 122 91 61 30 365 334 303 273 242 212 Aug. | 212 181 153 122 92 61 31 365) 334 304 273 243 Sept. 243 212 184 153 123 91 62 31 365 335 304 274 Oct. 273 242 214 183) 153) 122 92 61 30 365 334 304 Nov. /-304 273 246 214| 184 153 123 92 61 31 365 335 Dec.

3341 303 275 2441 214) 1831 153 122 91 61 301 365

PRACTICAL EXERCISES IN INTEREST.

A's note, dated April 17, 1793, for $675, on Int. at 6 per cent. per annum:--Endorsed, May 7, 1794, paid $148;-Aug. 17, 1796, paid $341:-Jan. 2, 1778, paid $99; what was due 17 of June 1798 ?.

Ans. 219.52,

B. lent D, June 1, 1800, $2000. Aug. 19, 1800, D paid $400;--Oct. 15, 1800, D paid $600;-also 11th Dec. 1800, $400, and on 17th Feb. 1801, $200;- finally, on June 1, 1801, he paid $400; what was the balance Int. at 6 per cent. per annum?

Ans. D owes $62.88. M gave N his note for $1000, Jan. 4, 1797, on Int. at 6 per cent. per annum. Feb. 19, 1798, N paid $200;-Jan. 29, 1799, N paid $500;-N paid $260; what was due Dec. 24th, 1800, Int. 6 per cent.

Ans. $200.58.

FALSE SYNTAX.LESSON 40.

RULE 9. Every adjective pronoun refers to some noun o, pronour, expressed or implied. As, Mary teaches my child.

Obs. 1. The adjective pronouns this and that, with their plaerals, these and those, and with other and another, and the numeral adjectives, must agree in number with the nouns to which they refer.

These kind of indulgences, soften and injure the mind.

This sentence is faulty:for the adjective pronoun, these, is of the plural number, and does not agree with the noun, kind, to which it refers, in violation of rule 9th;therefore, these, should be, this:--Thus:--This kind, f.c.

You have been playing this two hours. Those sort of favours did real injury. The room is twenty foot long and sixteen foot wide. He saw one or more persons enter the door.

Obs. 2. The nouns means and news, are used in the singular number, and the adjective pronoun agrees with them readily.

Joseph was extravagant, and by this means become poor. By that ungenerous means he obtained his end. What is these news. He came to town and brought those news.

Obs. 3. The distributive adjective pronouns, each, every, either, agree with nouns, pronouns, and verbs, in the singular number.

Each of the men, in their turn, receive these news. Neither of these boys know their duty. Every leaf and twig shake. Every man, woman and child were counted.

Obs. 4. That, is used to refer to a former thing mentioned, and this, to a latter thing.

Self love the spring of action in the soul, is ruled by reason:--but for that man would be inactive, and but for this, he would be active to no purpose.

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LESSON 42. Remarks on the application of the inflections. The application of the inflections or slides of the voice to the pronunciation of written language, is of recent date. It was first attempted by Mr. John Walker of England; and more recently by several authors in this country. Among the most prominent of our own productions on this subject, is a treatise by the Rev. Dr. Porter of Andover. But Dr. Por ter, like Mr. Walker, furnishes the theory only, of their application to a certain class of sentences; but, not like Mr. Walker, rejects their application to the series:--hence, his work is less perfect than Mr. Walker's, and therefore, like his, can be useful to none but a few able scholars. His plan will tend to confine the knowledge and application of the inflections, (one of the highest figures of eloquence,) to a few individuals, and nurse a literary aristocracy, the growth of which must carry pain to the bosom of every friend to rational liberty. I have endeavored to furnish the pupil with a concise course of simple rules, taken from Mr. Walker's Text and have not only illustrated them by examples, but exhibited, to the best

my ability, their application, by sensible signs, to the pronunciation of whole chapters.

I have earnestly endeavored to reduce the whole system to the level of ordinary capacities, and to bring within the reach of every scholar, all that is requisite, both in theory and practice, to enable him to acquire a handsome and powerful style of delivery: and the fault shall be his and his teacher's, should ne fail to attain it.

LESSON 43.

Practical Exercises in Simple Interest. (1) What is the amount of $842, for 5 1-4 years, at 4 per .cent. a year?

Ans. $1018.82. (2) What is the agiount of £1000 for 1 1-6 year, at 7 per cent. per annum?

Ans. £1081.66 1-19. (3) What is the Int. of $482, for 7 years, at 6 per cent, a year?

Ans. $202.44. (4) What is the Int. of $1500, for 1 year, at 1-2 per cent.

Ans. $7.50. (5) What is the Int. of $3459, for 75 days, at 6 per cent

Ans. $42.66.

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