Abbildungen der Seite
PDF
EPUB

242

merchandises, until the cargo has been landed in the presence of officers ap-
pointed for the purpose, and until an inventory thereof has been taken ; nor
shall it be lawful to sell, exchange, or alienate the cargo, or any part there-
of, until legal process shall have been had against the prohibited merchan-
dises, and sentence shall have passed declaring them liable to confiscation,
saving nevertheless as well the ships themselves, as the other merchandises
which shall have been found therein, which, by virtue of this present treaty,
are to be esteemed free, and which are not to be detained on pretence of
their having been loaded with prohibited merchandise, and much less con-
fiscated as lawful prize. And in case the contraband merchandise be only
a part of the cargo, and the master of the vessel agrees, consents, and
offers to deliver them to the vessel that has discovered them, in that case
the latter, after receiving the merchandises which are good prize, shall im-
mediately let the vessel go, and shall not by any means hinder her from
pursuing her voyage to the place of her destination. When a vessel is taken
and brought into any of the ports of the contracting parties, if upon exami-
nation she be found to be loaded only with merchandises declared to be
free, the owner or he who has made the prize, shall be bound to pay

all costs and damages to the master of the vessel unjustly detained.(1)

834. It is likewise agreed, that whatever shall be found to be laden by the subjects of either of the two contracting parties, on a ship belonging to the enemies of the other party, the whole effects, although not of the number of those declared contraband, shall be confiscated as if they belonged to the enemy, excepting nevertheless such goods and merchandises as were put on board before the declaration of war, and even six months after the declaration, after which term none shall be presumed to be ignorant of it; which merchandises shall not in any manner be subject to confiscation, but shall be faithfully and specifically delivered to the owners, who shall claim or cause them to be claimed before confiscation and sale, as also their proceeds, if the claim be made within eight months, and could not be made sooner after the sale, which is to be public: provided nevertheless, that if the said merchandises be contraband, it shall not be in any wise lawful to carry them afterwards to a port belonging to the enemy.(2)

835. And that more effectual care may be taken for the security of the two contracting parties, that they suffer no prejudice by the men of war of the other party, or by privateers, all captains and commanders of ships of his Swedish majesty, and of the United States, and all their subjects, shall be forbidden to do any injury or damage to those of the other party, and if they act to the contrary, having been found guilty on examination by their proper judges, they shall be bound to make satisfaction for all damages and the interest thereof, and to make them good under pain and obligation of their persons and goods.(3) )

836. For this cause, every individual who is desirous of fitting out a privateer, shall, before he receives letters patent, or special commission, be obliged to give bond with sufficient sureties, before a competent judge, for a sufficient sum, to answer all damages and wrongs which the owner of the privateer, his officers, or others in his employ, may commit during the cruise, contrary to the tenor of this treaty, and contrary to the edicts pub. lished by either party, whether by the king of Sweden or by the United States, in virtue of this same treaty, and also under the penalty of having the said letters patent and special commission revoked and made void.(4)

837. One of the contracting parties being at war, and the other remain

[ocr errors]

(1) Treaty of 1783, Art. 13.
(2) Ibid. Art. 14.

(3) lbid. Art. 15.
(4) Ibid. Art. 16.

[ocr errors]

ing neuter, if it should happen that a merchant ship of the neutral power be taken by the enemy of the other party, and be afterwards retaken by a ship of war or privateer of the power at war, also ships and merchandises of what nature soever they may be, when recovered from a pirate or sea rover, shall be brought into a port of one of the two powers, and shall be committed to the custody of the officers of the said port, they may be restored entire to the true proprietor as soon as he shall have produced full proof of the property.

838. Merchants, masters, and owners, of ships, seamen, people of all sorts, ships and vessels, and in general, all merchandises and effects of one of the allies or their subjects, shall not be subject to any embargo, nor detained in any of the countries, territories, islands, cities, towns, ports, rivers, or domains whatever, of the other ally, on account of any military expedition, or any public or private purpose whatever, by seizure, by force, or by any such manner; much less shall it be lawful for the subjects of one of the parties to seize or take any thing by force, from the subjects of the other party, without the consent of the owner. This, however, is not to be understood to comprehend seizures, detentions, and arrests, made by order and by the authority of justice, and according to the ordinary course for debts or faults of the subject, for which process shall be had in the way of right according to the forms of justice.(1)

839. If it should happen that the two contracting parties should be engaged in a war at the same time with a common enemy, the following points shall be observed on both sides :

1. If the ships of one of the two nations, retaken by the privateers of the other, have not been in the power of the enemy more than twenty-four hours, they shall be restored to the original owner, on payment of one-third of the value of the ship and cargo. If, on the contrary, the vessel retaken has been more than twenty-four hours in the power of the enemy, it shall belong wholly to him who has retaken it.

2. In case, during the interval of twenty-four hours, a vessel be retaken by a man of war of either of the two parties, it shall be restored to the original owner, on payment of a thirtieth part of the value of the vessel and cargo, and a tenth part if it has been retaken after the twenty-four hours, which sums shall be distributed as a gratification among the crew of the men of war that shall have made the recapture.

3. The prizes made in manner above mentioned, shall be restored to the owners, after proof made of the property, upon giving security for the part coming to him who has recovered the vessel from the hands of the enemy.

4. The men of war and privatcers of the two nations shall reciprocally be admitted with their prizes into cach other's ports; but the prizes shall not be unloaded or sold there until the legality of a prize made by Swedish ships shall have been determined according to the laws and regulations established in Sweden, as also that of the prizes made by American vessels shall have been determined according to the laws and regulations established by the United States of America.

5. Moreover, the king of Sweden and the United States of America shall be at liberty to make such regulations as they shall judge necessary respecting the conduct which their men of war and privateers respectively shall be bound to observe, with regard to vessels which they shall take and carry into the ports of the two powers.(2)

810. The ships of war of his Swedish majesty and those of the United States, and also those which their subjects shall have armed for war, may,

(1) Treaty of 1783, Art. 17.

(2) Ibid. Art. 18.

RI

244

[ocr errors]

with all freedom, conduct the prizes which they shall have made from their enemies into the ports which are open in time of war to other friendly na. tions; and the said prizes, upon entering the said ports, shall not be subject to arrest or seizure, nor shall the officers of the places take cognizance of the validity of the said prizes, which may depart and be conducted freely and with all liberty to the places pointed out in their commissions, which the captains of the said vessels shall be obliged to show.(1)

841. When the subjects and inhabitants of the two parties, with their ves. sels, whether they be public and equipped for war, or private, or employed in commerce, shall be forced by tempest, by pursuit of privateers and of enemies, or by any other urgent necessity, to retire and enter any of the rivers, bays, roads, or ports of either of the two parties, they shall be received and treated with all humanity and politeness, and they shall enjoy all friendship, protection, and assistance, and they shall be at liberty to supply themselves with refreshments, provisions, and every thing necessary for their sustenance, for the repair of their vessels, and for continuing their voyage; provided always, that they pay a reasonable price: and they shall not in any manner be detained or hindered from sailing out of the said ports or roads, but they may retire and depart when and as they please, without any obstacle or hinderance.(2)

842. In order to favour commerce on both sides as much as possible, it is agreed, that in case a war should break out between the said two nations, which God forbid, the term of nine months after the declaration of war, shall be allowed to the merchants and subjects respectively on one side and the other, in order that they may withdraw with their effects and moveables, which they shall be at liberty to carry off or to sell where they please, with. out the least obstacle; nor shall any seize their effects, and much less their persons, during the said nine months; but, on the contrary, passports, which shall be valid for a time necessary for their return, shall be given them for their vessels and the effects which they shall be willing to carry with them. And if any thing is taken from them, or if any injury is done to them by one of the parties, their people, and subjects, during the term above prescribed, full and entire satisfaction shall be made to them on that account. The above mentioned passports shall also serve as a safe conduct against all insults or prizes which privateers may attempt against their persons and effects.(3)

843. No subject of the king of Sweden shall take a commission or letters of marque for arming any vessel to act as a privateer against the United States of America, or any of them, or against the subjects, people, or in. habitants of the said United States, or any of them, or against the property of the inhabitants of the said states, from any prince or state whatever, with whom the said United States shall be at war. Nor shall any citizen, subject, or inhabitant of the said United States, or any of them, apply for or take any commission, or letters of marque, for arming any vessel to cruise against the subjects of his Swedish majesty, or any of them, or their property, from any prince or state whatever with whom his said majesty shall be at war. And if any person of either nation shall take such commissions or letters of marque, he shall be punished as a pirate.(4)

844. When a vessel belonging to the subjects and inhabitants of either of the parties, sailing on the high sea, shall be met by a ship of war or privateer of the other, the said ship of war or privateer, to avoid all disorder, shall remain out of cannon shot, but may always send their boat to the mer.

[ocr errors]

(1) Treaty of 1783. Art. 19. (2) Ibid. Art. 21.

(3) Ibid. Art. 22. (4) Ibid. Art. 23.

chant ship, and cause two or three men to go on board of her, to whom the master or commander of the said vessel shall exhibit his passport, stating the property of the vessel ; and when the said vessel shall have exhibited her passport, she shall be at liberty to continue her voyage, and it shall not be lawful to molest or search her in any manner, or to give her chase, or force her to quit her intended course.(1)

845. His Swedish majesty shall use all the means in his power to protect and defend the vessels and effects belonging to the citizens or inhabitants of the United States of North America, and every of them, which shall be in the ports, havens, roads, or on the seas, near the countries, islands, cities, and towns of his said majesty, and shall use his utmost endeavours to recover and restore to the right owners, all such vessels and effects which shall be taken from them within his jurisdiction.(2)

846. In like manner the United States of North America shall protect and defend the vessels and effects belonging to the subjects of his Swedish majesty, which shall be in the ports, havens, or roads, or on the seas near to the countries, islands, cities, and towns of the said states, and shall use their utmost efforts to recover and restore to the right owners, all such vessels and effects which shall be taken from them within their juris. diction.(3)

847. It is agreed and concluded that all merchants, captains of merchant ships, or other subjects of his Swedish majesty, shall have full liberty in all places under the dominion or jurisdiction of the United States of America, to manage their own affairs, and to employ in the management of them, whomsoever they please ; and they shall not be obliged to make use of any interpreter or broker, nor to pay them any reward unless they make use of them. Moreover, the masters of ships shall not be obliged, in loading or unloading their vessels, to employ labourers appointed by public authority for that purpose ; but they shall be at full liberty themselves, to load or unload their vessels, or to employ in loading or unloading them, whomsoever they think proper, without paying reward under the title of salary to any other person whatever; and they shall not be obliged to turn over any kind of merchandises to other vessels, nor to receive them on board their own, nos to wait for their lading longer than they please; and all and every of the citizens, people, and inhabitants of the United States of America, shall reciprocally have and enjoy the same privileges and liberties in all places under the jurisdiction of the said realm.(4)

843. It is agreed that when merchandises shall have been put on board the ships or vessels of either of the contracting parties, they shall not be subjected to any examination ; but all examination and search must be before lading, and the prohibited merchandises must be stopped on the spot before they are embarked, unless there is full evidence or proof of fraudu. lent practice on the part of the owner of the ship, or of him who has the command of her; in which case only, he shall be responsible and subject to the laws of the country in which he may be.(5)

849. In all other cases, neither the subjects of either of the contracting parties, who shall be with their vessels in the ports of the other, nor their merchandises, shall be seized or molested on account of contraband goods, which they shall have wanted to take on board, nor shall any kind of em. bargo be laid on their ships, subjects, or citizens of the state whose merchandises are declared contraband, or the exportation of which is forbidden ; (1) Treaty of 1783, Art. 25.

(4) Ibid. Art. 4. (2) Treaty 1783, separate, Art. 1. (5) Ibid. Art. 5. (3) Ibid. Art. 2.

those only who shall have sold or intended to sell or alienate such merchandise, being liable to punishment for such contravention.(1)

850. The citizens or subjects of one of the high contracting parties arriving with their vessels on the coasts belonging to the other, but not wishing to enter the port, or after having entered therein, not wishing to unload any part of their cargo, shall be at liberty to depart and continue their voyage, without paying any other duties, imposts, or charges, whatsoever, for the vessel and cargo, than those of pilotage, wharfage, and for the support of light-houses, when such duties shall be levied on national vessels in similar cases. It is understood, however, that they shall always conform to such regulations and ordinances concerning navigation, and the places and ports which they may enter, as are, or shall be, in force with regard to national vessels ; and that the custom-house officers shall be permitted to visit them, to remain on board, and to take all such precautions as may be necessary to prevent all unlawful commerce, as long as the vessels shall remain within the limits of their jurisdiction.(2)

851. It is further agreed, that the vessels of one of the high contracting parties, having entered into the ports of the other, will be permitted to confine themselves to unloading such part only of their cargoes, as the captain or owner may wish, and that they may freely depart with the remainder, without paying any duties, imposts, or charges, whatsoever, except for that part which shall have been landed, and which shall be marked upon, and erased from, the manifest exhibiting the enumeration of the articles with which the vessel was laden ; which manifest shall be presented entire at the custom-house of the place where the vessel shall have entered. Nothing shall be paid on that part of the cargo which the vessel shall carry away, and with which it may continue its voyage, to one, or several other ports of the same country, there to dispose of the remainder of its cargo, if composed of articles whose importation is permitted, on paying the duties chargeable upon it; or it may proceed to any other country. It is understood, however, that all duties, imposis, or charges whatsoever, which are, or may become, chargeable upon the vessels themselves, must be paid at the first port where they shall break bulk, or unlade part of their cargoes ; but that no duties, imposts, or charges, of the same description, shall be demanded anew in the ports of the same country, which such vessels might afterwards wish to enter, unless national vessels be, in similar cases, subject to some ulterior duties.(3)

852. Each of the high contracting parties grants to the other, the privilege of appointing, in its commercial ports and places, consuls, vice consuls, and commercial agents, who shall enjoy the full protection, and receive every assistance necessary for the due exercise of their functions; but it is expressly declared, that in case of illegal or improper conduct, with respect to the laws or government of the country in which said consuls, vice consuls, or commercial agents shall reside, they may be prosecuted and punished conformably to the laws, and deprived of the exercise of their functions by the offended government, which shall acquaint the other with its motives for having thus acted; it beinig understood, however, that the archives and documents relative to the affairs of the consulate shall be exempt from all search, and shall be carefully preserved under the seals of the consuls, vice consuls, or commercial agents, and of the authority of the place where they

[ocr errors]

may reside.

853. The consuls, vice consuls, or commercial agents, or the persons

(1) Treaty 1783, separate, Art. 5. (2) Treaty 1827, Art. 11.

(3) Ibid. Art. 12.

« ZurückWeiter »