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Rules to promote harmony in words themselves,

283
Rules to promote the harmony of words, with respect to
one another,

284
Rules to promote harmony, with regard to the members
of sentences,

285
Sense should not be sacrificed to sound,

287
Poetical harmony--its principles,

229-231
HYPHEN. When to be used, and when to be omitted, be-

tween two nouns,
Its general nature and use,

246

, 150, 151

1.

IDIOMS of other languages may be adopted; but with pro-
per limitations,

77, 96, 101, 102
IMPERATIVE mood. See Mood.
IMPERSONAL verbs. See Verbs.
INFINITIVE mood. See Moods.
INNOVATIONS in some parts of English grammar are ea.
sily made,

7, 78, 80
They should be admitted with caution,

7, 78, 80
INSTRUCTION, moral and religious, should be occasionally

blended with the elements of learning, 6, Exercises, v, vi.
INTERJECTION. Its nature and extent,

40, 119
When to be omitted, or repeated,

191. The Key, 67
Rules of Syntax respecting it,

138, 195
INTERROGATION. What case follows it,

140
Sentences containing it parsed,

199
Rules for applying the point,

243, 244
Sometimes used as a figure of speech,

296
INTERROGATIVE. See Pronoun and Subsequent.
IRREGULAR. See Verb.

K.

KEY. The use of this Key to private learners,

Advantages of the mode of forming it,

Exercises, v
Excercises, y,

L.

LEARNING. Its elements should be occasionally blended

with moral and religious instruction, 6, Exercises, v. vi.
Its happiest application,

298, 299
LETTERS. See vowels and consonants.
Several letters in the English alphabet superfluous,

16, 17

M.

MEANS. The phrases this means and that nieans, vifidica.
ted,

142-196

MELODY, harmony, and expression, with regard to versi-
fication,

229, 233
As they regard Prose. See Harmony.
MEMBER of a sentence distinguished from a Clause, 125
Members how to be pointed,

235, 237, 238, 239
See Arrangement and Sentences.
METAPHOŘ. The nature of it-Rules to be observed in
using it,

289292
METONÝMY. The nature of this figure of speech,

294
MOODS. Their nature and variety explained,

67, 68
The extent and limitation of English Moods,

71, 96
The Potential mood in English supported,

70, 71
The Potential mood furnished with four tenses,

80, 81
The Potential converted into the Subjunctive,

84
The Subjunctive mood when, and how, varied in its form,
from the Indicative,

81, 82, 90, 94, 95, 183, 184
The existence of a subjunctive mood, in English
proved,

95, 96, 183, 184
Various opinions of grammarians, respecting the existence,

nature, and extent, of the English Subjunctive mood, 183, 184
In what cases conjunctions require the Subjunctive
mood,

177, 182
When contingency and futurity concar, the termination
of the verb is varied,

179, 182
Indicative mood different from the Potential,

70, 71
Indicative different from the Subjunctive, 70, 82, 94, 95, 184
Infinitive mood. Its great simplicity,

68, 69
MOOD. How it is governed and applied,

161, 162, 163
The sign to is often misapplied,

162
When the present and when the perfect, of the infinitive,
is to be used,

163–166. Key, 43, 45
This point exemplified,

Exercises, 73, 74. Key, 42, 44
The infinitive mood often made absolute,

163
How it is to be pointed,

237
Imperative mood, variously applied,

67, 80, 126
Extent of the Imperative, strictly considered,
A verb in this mood, is not affirmative,

65
The same moods connected by conjunctions, 176, 177
MOVEMENT and measure, how distinguished,

227
MULTITUDE. Nouns of this kind operate variously on
the verb,

134

SO, 203

N.

1

NATIONS. Different nations have used various contrivan-

ces to mark the moods, tenses, and cases, 49, 96, 100, 101, 109
NEGATIVES. Two in English form an affirmative,

172
Two of them are often used, instead of one,

172
This point elucidated,

Exercises, SO, 81. Key, 50
NEUTER pronoun it, very variously applied,

139
NEUTER verb. See Verb.
NOMINATIVE case. Its nature explained,
It follows the verb, in interrogative and imperative ceu-
tences,

126

126

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It agrees with the verb, in number and person,
The infinitive mood, or part of a sentence, is often the
nominative case to a verb,

127
Every verb has a nominative case, except, &c.

127
Every nominative belongs to some verb, except, &c. 128
In certain circumstances, a verb between two nouns, may
have either for its nominative,

128
A nominative before a participle, &c. forms the case ab-
solute,

128
The nominative is commonly placed before the verb-in
what cases after it,

129
In the phrases as follows, as appears, what are the nomi-
natives to the verbs,

129, 130
NOMINATIVE case. The nominative to the verb is some-
times not easily ascertained,

131, 132
In what instance is the relative the nominative to the verb, 139
When there are two nominatives of different persons, to
which should the verb apply,

141
Rules for pointing the nominative,

235, 239
See Case.
NOUNS. Their nature and divisions,

43
Three modes of distinguishing their gender,

44, 45
But few in English, with variable terininations,

46
The number of nouns how formed,

46, 48
English nouns have but three cases,

48_-52
Two successive nouns in the possessive case to be
avoided,

61, 52
Nounsare often formed by participles,

69, 701
They are often derived from verbs and adjectives, 120, 121
Singular nouns joined by a copulative, require their
verbs, &c. to be in the plural number,

130
This required even when the nouns are nearly related, 131
Cases of difficulty stated, and resolved,

131, 132
When the nouns are of different persons, which is to be
preferred,

133
Singular nouns connected by a disjunctive, require the
verb, &c. to be in the singnlar number,

133
When the disjunctive noun and pronoun are of different
persons, the verb agrees with the nearer,

133
A disjunctive between a singular and a plural noun, re-
quires the verb to be plural,

133, 134
Nouns of multitude sometimes require a singular verb,
sometimes a plural one,

134
This point exemplified,

Exercises, 55, 56. Key, 24
One noun governs another in the possessive case,

153
If the nouns signify the same thing, there is no variation

154
The nouns are then in apposition,

154
The construction chauged by a relative and verb,

154
Rules for applying, or omitting, the sign of the possessive
case,

154, 158
The preposition of is frequently preferred to the sign of
the possessive case,

157, 158
A noun may be formed by the article and participle, and
by the pronoun and participle,

167, 168

of case,

161

NOUNS. In what cases the noun is omitted, in what re-

peated,
How to be pointed,

236, 238
See Case. Declension.
NUMBER. The nature of it shown,

46
How the plural number of nouns is formed,

46, 47
Applicable to nouns, pronouns, and verbs, 46, 55, 50, 66

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OBJECTIONS. Most of those made to this system of gram-

mar answered,
OBJECTIVE case. See Case.
OBSCURITY. It arises from a wrong choice of words, 252-256
And from a wrong arrangement of them,

262-267
Three chief causes of writing obscurely,

255, 256
OPPOSITION. Words opposed how to be pointed,

238
Sentiments opposed how to be expressed,

281
ORDER of words and members. See Arrangement.
ORTHOGRAPHY.

13-37
Far from being uniform, in English,

36, 37
Rules for forming primitive and derivative words, 3437
The orthography of Dr. Johnson not to be altered on
slight grounds,

37
See Alphabet, Syllables, Vowels and Consonants, fc.

P.

PARAGRAPHS. Rules for dividing a work into para-
graphs,

247, 248
PARENTHESIS. In what cases it is proper, in what im-
proper,

245, 270, 271
The point to be placed within it,

245
PARSING. Its nature and use,

195
Etymological parsing,

195—197. Exercises, 2
Syntactical parsing,

197–203. Exercises, 17
Etymological parsing table,

Exercises, 1
Syntactical parsing table,

Exercises, 16
PARTICIPLE. Its nature and properties esplained, 68-70
Perfect and passive participle distinguished,

68
It is not a distinct part of speech,

94
Its use in conjugating both the active and passive
.verbs,

94, 96, 99
The participle and its adjuncts form a substantive
phrase,

168, 203
The participle has the same government as its verb, 167
It becomes a substantive, by means of the article,

167
And also by means of the pronoun,

168
The perfect participle and imperfect tense not to be
confounded,

169
The participle with its dependencies, how to be pointed, 237
Reasons for assigning it a distinct place in Syntax, Exercises, 75

P

CICLE as, is not always equivalent to the pronoun it,
Pfor that, or which,

130. Key, 60
RTS of speech. Variously enumerated by grammarians, 40

The same word forms different parts of speech. See Words.
PAUSES. Their nature, kinds, and uses,

215--218
Rules for applying them properly,

216, 217
The closing and suspending pauses distinguished,

217
Poetical pauses of two sorts,

227-229
PERIOD. Directions for using it,

242
PERSONIFICATION. Its nature and use,

295
PERSONS. Applicable to nouns, pronouns and verbs, 43, 55, 66
Three necessary in each number,

65, 66
The second takes place of the third, and the first of both, 133
The second person is the object of the imperative,

80
The nominative and verb agree in person,

126
How to avoid the confusion of persons,

133
Relative and antecedent are of the same person,

135
The person is variable when the relative is preceded by
two nominatives of different persons,

141
Persons of the verb when to be varied, when
not,

94, 95, 178-184
PERSPICUITY and accuracy,

250-305
See Purity, Propriety, Precision, Clearness, Unily, and

Strength.
PHRASE. Its nature,

126, 234
How to be pointed,

235, 240
The phrase, “ as follows,” explained,

129, 130, 139
The phrase, “every leaf and every twig,” requires a sin-
gular verb,

Key. Rule viii. Note 3. p. 32
*POETICAL feet. Why called Feet.

220
Formed, in English, by accented and unaccented syllables, 220
Their kinds, divisions, and subdivisions,

221-227
Poetical barmony. See Harmony and Melody.

Poetical pauses. See Pauses.
POSITION of words. Great importance of the situation, in
which words are placed in the sentence,

283
The place of adverbs, relatives, and circumstances, neces.
sary to the clearness of a sentence,

263-267
See Arrangement.
POSSESSIVE case. The sign of it when and where to be
applied,

155-157
In what instances, both the sign and the preposition of are
to be used,

157-158
POTENTIAL mood. See Mood.
PRECISIO: of language. In what it consists,

257
Three faults opposed to precision,

259
Words termed synonymous are the great source of a loose

style,
PREPOSITIONS. Their nature and office,

113
They often give verbs a new meaning,

113
Certain sytuebles improperly termed inseparable prepo-
sitions,

113
The peculiar use of prepositions shown,

114
They are often properly omitted,

191

259, 260

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