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Resolved, That the committee on the Post Office and Post Roads, be instructed to inquire into the expediency of establishing a post road from Beaver Town, in the county of Beaver, to the town of Butler, in the county of Butler, in the state of Pennsylvania.

On motion of Mr. Scott, Resolved, That the committee on the Public Lands be instructed to inquire into the expediency of providing by law, for the making diposable, like other public lands, such parts and portions of the lead mines, and salt springs in the Missouri Territory, as shall be deemed not of sufficient extent or value to be retained by the government, reserving such only as shall be deemed of sufficient extent and value for the public use.

The House took up the amendments proposed by the Senate to the resolution directing the procurement of certain laws;" and the same being read, were concurred in.

Ordered, That the Clerk acquaint the Senate therewith.
A message from the Senate, by Mr. Cutts, their Secretary.

Mr. Speaker: The Senate have concurred in the amendment proposed by this House, to their amendment to the bill, entitled “ An act for the relief of Joel Earwood:” 'and they have passed the bill, entitled “ An act for the relief of Winslow and Henry Lewis," with an amendment, in which they ask the concurrence of this House. And then he withdrew.

Mr. Speed, from the joint committee for Enrolled Bills, reported that the committee had examined enrolled bills of the following titles, viz:

An act to prolong the continuance of the mint at Philadelphia.

An act to remit the duty on a painting presented to the Pennsylvania Hospital; and,

And an act for the relief of Samuel Aikman;
And had found the same to be truly enrolled; when,
The Speaker signed the said bills.
Ordered, That the Clerk acquaint the Senate therewith.

The House resumed the consideration of the resolutions submitted on the 9th instant, by Mr. Spencer, concerning John Ander

son; when

A motion was made by Mr. Rhea, to amend the preamble perfixed to the said resolutions, by striking out these words, viz: “ertertaining great doubts of its;"

And after debate thereon,
The House adjourned.

TUESDAY, January 13, 1818.

Mr. Mason, of Massachusetts, presented a petition of the Vermont Mineral Factory Company, praying that an additional duty of one dollar a ton may be imposed on foreign copperas, imported into the United States.

Mr. Hitchcock presented a petition of sundry inhabitants of the counties of Cuyahoga, Geauga, and Ashtabula, in the state of Ohio, praying that a new collection district, for the collection of duties on import and tonnage, may be established on the waters of Lake Erie, within the said state.

The Speaker presented a petition of sundry manufacturers of silver plated saddlery, coach, and harness furniture, residing in Lexington, in the state of Kentucky, praying that additional duties may be imposed on those articles imported into the United States.

Mr. Hopkinson presented a petition of Jacob Ritter, merchant of Philadelphia, praying to be allowed the drawback to which he is entitled for the exportation of a quantity of merchandise, which he is unable to obtain, in consequence of failing to take the necessary oaths in due time,

Ordered, That the said petitions be referred to the committee of Commerce and Manufactures.

Mr. Palmer presented a petition of Samuel Buell, late collector of the customs for the district of Vermont, praying that some person residing in the said district, may be authorized to adjust and settle his accouuts with the United States, and admit to his credit certain items which have been rejected by the Comptroller of the Treasury, in consequence of his want of power to admit the same.

Ordered, That the said petition be referred to the Secretary of the Treasury.

Mr. Comstock presented a petition of Doctor James Smith, agent for the dissemination of the vaccine matter, praying that further measures may be adopted to ensure the free supply of vaccine matter to every citizen of the United States; and that additional pecuniary aid may be afforded, so as to enable him to keep up an uninterrupted supply of the said matter; which was read and referred to a select committee; and,

Mr. Comstock, Mr. Floyd, Mr. Hogg, Mr. Abbott, and Mr. Hall, were appointed the said committee.

Mr. Bassett presented a petition of Thomas Griffin, praying that the Secretary of the Treasury may be directed to pay him the amount of certain bills, drawn on the Treasury of the United States, in virtue of the treaty with France, ceding Louisiana to the United States; for reasons set forth in the petition.

Mr. Forsyth presented a petition of Joseph Bevan, praying for a remission of duties imposed on a highly improved steam engine imported by him from Great Britain.

Ordered, That the said petitions be referred to the committee of Ways and Means.

Mr. Pindall presented a petition of Samuel Sprigg, praying that certain moneys paid by him to the United States, for a tract of land lying within the state of Ohio, may be refunded, for reasons set forth in the petition.

Mr. Robertson of Louisiana, presented a petition of sundry inhabitants of West Florida, praying that certain claims to lands in that country, which the petitioners alledge were obtained for the purposes of speculation, may not be confirmed.

Ordered, that the said petitions be referred to the committee on the Public Lands.

Mr. Speed presented a petition of Sarah Weathers, daughter and only child, of Thomas H. Boyle, deceased, late a major in the revolutionary army, praying compensation for the services of the said Boyle, while serving in the capacity aforesaid.

Mr. Johnson presented documents in support of the claims of William Arnold, Willis Tandy, Garrard Burns, and Armstead Whitehead, for pensions and increase of pensions.

The Speaker presented a petition of Charles Van Dyke, pray, ing for a pension.

Ordered, That the said petitions and documents be referred to the committee on Pensions and Revolutionary Claims.

The Speaker presented a petition of the President and Directors of the Bank of the United States, praying that the act of incorporation of the said Bank may be so amended as to authorize the President and Cashier of its several Offices of Discount and Deposit, to sign and countersign the notes to be issued at said offices; which was referred to a select committee; and,

Mr. Sergeant, Mr. Smith, of Maryland, Mr. Tallmadge, Mr. Robertson, of Kentucky, and Mr. Terrill, were appointed the said committee.

Mr. Harrison presented a petition of John D. Needham, John D. Perkins, Thomas I. Ferriar, Joseph Holland, Richard Stacey, James Stacey, Charles Webster, Robert Fry, Frederick Beise, and Benjamin Parks, stating that they arrived at Philadelphia in the month of October last, on their way to South America, and that they were there arrested, on a charge of violating the provisions of an act passed at the last session of Congress, for preserving the neutral relations of the United States; that they were imprisoned in consequence of their inability to procure bail, that they have been cleared upon trial of the charges preferred against them, and that in consequence of the said arrest and imprisonment, they have been subjected to much expense, trouble and inconvenience, and praying such relief in the premises, as to Congress shall appear just and reasonable; which was read and referred to a select committee; and,

Mr. Harrison, Mr. Strother, Mr. Forsyth, Mr. Moore, and Mr. Orr, were appointed the said committee.

Mr. Rhea, from the committee on Pensions and Revolutionary Claims, made a report on the petition of John Carr, which was read and ordered to lie on the table.

Mr. Robertson, of Louisiana, from the committee on the Public Lands, made a report on the petition of sundry emigrants from Switzerland, which was read and the resolution therein contained was concurred in by the House, as follows:

Resolved, That the prayer of the petitioners ought not to be granted.

Mr. Johnson, of Kentucky, from the committee on Military Affairs, reported a bill concerning half pay pensions, invalid pensioners, and for other purposes; which was read the first and second time and committed to the committee of the whole, to which is committed the resolution submitted by Mr. Johnson, of Kentucky, on the 7th ultimo.

The Speaker laid before the House, a letter from the Secretary of State, transmitting a list of the names of such persons as have obtained patents during the last year, for any new and useful improvement, which was ordered to lie on the table.

The Speaker also laid before the House, a document in relation to the contested election of Charles F. Mercer, which was referred to the committee of Elections.

Mr. Wilson, of Pennsylvania, from the joint coamittee for Enrolled Bills, reported, that the committee had this day presented to the President of the United States, the enrolled bills examined yesterday.

On motion of Mr. Hopkinson, Resolved, That the committee on the Judiciary, be instructed to prepare and report a bill of fees for the officers of the United States, in the courts of the United States.

A message from the Senate, by Mr. Cutts, their Secretary:

Mr. Speaker, The Senate have passed the bill, entitled “ An act allowing compensation to the members of the Senate and House of Representatives, and the delegates from territories, and to repeal all other laws upon that subject,” with an amendment; in which they ask the concurrence of this House. And then he withdrew.

A message, in writing, was received from the President of the United States, by Mr. Joseph Jones Monroe, his Secretary, as follows:

To the Senate and House of

Representatives of the United States: I have the satisfaction to inform Congress, that the establishment at Amelia Island has been suppressed, and without the effusion of blood. The papers which explain this transaction, I now lay before Congress,

By the suppression of this establishment and of that of Galveztown, which will soon follow, if it has not already ceased to exist, there is good cause to believe that the consummation of a project fraught with much injury to the United States, has been prevented. When we consider the persons engaged in it, being adventurers from different countries, with very few, if any, of the native inhabitants of the Spanish colonies, the territory on which the establishments were made; one on a portion of that claimed by the United States, westward of the Mississippi, the other on a part of East Florida, a province in negotiation between the United States and Spain--the claim of their leader as announced by his proclamation on taking possession of Amelia Island, comprising the whole of both the Floridas, without excepting that part of West Florida which is incorporated with the state of Louisiana—their conduct while in the possession of the island, making it instrumental to every species of contra. band, and in regard to slaves, of the most odious and dangerous character, it may fairly be concluded, that if the enterprize had succeeded on the scale on which it was formed, much annoyance and injury world have resulted from it to the United States.

Other circumstances were thought to be no less deserving of attention. The institution of a government by foreign adventurers in the island, distinct from the colonial governments of Buenos Ayres, Venezeula, or Mexico, pretending to sovereignty, and exercising its highest offices, particularly in granting commissions to privateers, were acts, which could not fail to draw after them, the most serious consequences. It was the duty of the executive, either to extend to this establishment, all the advantages of that neutrality which the United States had proclaimed and have observed in favor of the colonies of Spain, who by the strength of their own population and resources, had declared their independence, and were affording strong proof of their ability to maintain it, or of making the discrimination which circumstances required. Had the first course been pursued, we should not only have sanctioned all the unlawful claims and practices of this pretended government in regard to the United States, but have countenanced a system of privateering in the Gulf of Mexico, and elsewhere, the ill effects of which, might, and probably would, have been deeply and very extensively felt. The path of duty was plain from the commencement, but it was painful to enter upon it while the obligation could be resisted. The law of 1811, lately published, and which it is therefore proper now to mention, was considered applicable to the case, from the moment that the proclamation of the chief of the enterprize was scen, and its obligation was daily encreased by other considerations of high importance already mentioned, which were deemed sufficiently strong in themselves to dictate the course which has been pursued.

Early intimations having been received of the dangerous purposes of these adventurers, timely precautions were taken by the establishment of a force near the St. Mary's to prevent their effect, or it is probable, that it would have been more sensibly felt.

To such establishments made so near to our settlements, in the expectation of deriving aid from them, it is particularly gratifying to find, that very little encouragement was given.

The example so conspicuously displayed by our fellow citizens, that their sympathies cannot be perverted to improper purposes, but that a love of country, the influence of moral principles, and a respect for the laws, are predonsinate with them, is a sure pledge, that all the very flattering anticipations, which have been formed of the docess of our institutions, will be rcalized. This example, has proved, ibat if our relations with foreign powers, are to be changed

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