Abbildungen der Seite
PDF
EPUB

EDUCATIONAL REVIEW

628

//

VOLUME XI
January-May

1916

Published Monthly Except July and August

THE CATHOLIC EDUCATION PRESS

Under the Direction of the

DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION
THE CATHOLIC UNIVERSITY OF AMERICA, WASHINGTON, D. C.

[blocks in formation]

The Catholic Educational Review

JANUARY, 1916

SURVEY OF THE FIELD

STANDARDS AND STANDARDIZERS

The ninth annual report of the president and treasurer of the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching has been for several months in the hands of the reading public. There has been sufficient time, therefore, for all of us to have at least attempted to digest its contents and to reach some conclusions concerning the trend of this remarkable Foundation. From the rich content of this volume, space will not permit us to do more than quote and comment on one or two items.

A section entitled “The Classification of Medical Schools,” occupies thirteen pages of the report. It is a thought-stimulating document. After discussing the difficulties encountered in any attempt to classify colleges, this statement is made: “The classification of medical schools does not present the same difficulties. There are certain criteria that may be applied to them, or, indeed, to technical or professional schools of any sort, which are more definite and easier to appraise than in the case of colleges. Medicine is an applied science and an art besides. To know the science of medicine, the candidate must study anatomy, physiology, bacteriology, and other fundamental sciences.” This, of course, will be a revelation to our colleges and to the educated world in general. Even the doctors will prick up their ears at this news. The candidates for their profession will really have to study anatomy, physiology and bacteriology, but this is only prefatory on the part of the learned president of the Carnegie Foundation. Those who would profit by any real message he has to offer should first give close attention to certain other matters :

tund

« ZurückWeiter »