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LETTER TWELFTH.

Page.

Return to London-reflections on the impoverished condition

of the people—Tithes, taxes, and poor rates Causes of

the unhappy situation of the poor,

137

LETTER THIRTEENTH.

State of Religion-Established Church and its corruptions

Extracts from the remarks of a friend on the lower orders

of people about London-Beer drinking, Boxing matches, 159

LETTER FOURTEENTH.

Thomas Paine's writings—Cause of the disaffection of the

English government to them, not as they have stated

English infidels, Herbert, Hobbes, Shaftesbury, Boling-

broke, Toland, Collins, Woolston, Chubb, and Swift

Hume and Gibbon-general reflections,

179

LETTER FIFTEENTH.

Anniversary dinners of Moral and Religious Societies-true

motives of these institutions--Vapsittart, Wilberforce, and

Lord Gambier-Methodists,

197

LETTER SIXTEENTH.

Theatres—State of the Drama-Elliston-Kean-ludicrous

account of Kean dying-Lord Byron and his Tragediesma

Walter Scott and Barry Cornwall-Parson Mathuriu--su.

periority of the French stage,

LETTER SEVENTEENTH.

British Parliament--Slave Trade---Greeks--Brougham,

Mackintosh, and Wilberforce-Methodists-Opposition

and Radicalism-Canning -- Russia,: Coğland, France,

Austria, and Prüistas:

227

LETTER: SIGHTEENTH.

Crime-Causes of it in England::Vicesimus Knox-English

Clergy-Methodists-King-Marchioness of C- and

Marchioness of®HH Dukes at: *

********, Sus-

sex, and Calabria General Såmaske,

254

LETTER NINETEENTH.

Hereditary honours and wealth--Nobility-Franklin,

LETTER TWENTIETH.

English Government dissected-Henry VIII.-Elizabeth,

Charles, and James--King of England's Prerogative-

Queen's do.

290

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ADVERTISEMENT OF THE EDITOR.

The following Letters were addressed to a gentleman residing in one of the Eastern states, without any view to their publication.

The person to whom they were written has, however,

been induced to offer them to the public, in consequence of having lately seen the Travels of Howitt, Howison, Welby, &c.; and also the prospectus of a new work on the comparative state of crime in this country and in England. These works are evidently written with the exclusive objects of discouraging emigration to the United States, and at the same time, exhibiting to the world a picture, calculated to make the most injurious impressions, with regard to the state of our manners, morals, and religion.

It was believed that the explanations and details of a writer, who appears to have hạd good opportunities of obtaining infotiration ca sutjects litherto not well understood in the United States, might, in some degree, not only accouit for the perpetual recurrence of these scandalous' productions by developing the views of the writers and their patrons ; but, at the same time, arrest their influence, by showing the impure sources whence they originate. These letters, though not actually written with that express purpose, seem well calculated to do

away the impression, which it is the favourite object of this conspiracy against us to create ; to wit, that the freedom of our institutions and government has a direct tendency to

vili

ADVERTISEMENT.

render the people more profligate, unmanageable, and rude, than are the subjects of a limited monarchy; that republicanism and infidelity, licentiousness and freedom, are almost convertible terms, and that they seldom, if ever, are found apart.

A comparison has been drawn between the government of England, its laws and customs, and those of the United States ; the corruptions which disgrace every branch of their system are exposed ; and the reflections of the writer upon the condition of that people cannot fail, it is thought, to strengthen our attachment to the simplicity and purity of our own republican institutions.

It is proper to skate, that the arrangement of these letters is not strictly according to the order of their dates, but rather according to the connexion of the subjects of which they'treat. Sometimes, also, several letters have been cast into one, for the sake of collecting and embodying many facts and arguments, dispersed and isolated, all bearing on the same points. The whole has been transcribed in the family of the editor, omitting: anty such passages ae were of a private or personal nature.

A

h

SKETCH

OF

OLD ENGLAND.

LETTER I.

London. DEAR BROTHER,

Your complaints of the long intervals between my letters, and their silence on certain points concerning which you have requested information, are not aliogether unreasonable ; neither, in truth, are they altogether reasonable ; for after Iravelling all day, and employing every interval of, keisure to visit old castles and stately churches, the one ruined by time and violence, the other preserved by a sentiment of piety or pride, one has little inclination of an evening to describe them. I contented myself with merely noting in my memorandumbook such observations and reflections as seemed worth remembering, with a view to communicate them to you at my

leisure. Being now settled here during the pleasure of the * * * * * * * *

*, and my present situation allowing both leisure and opportunity, I mean to become the very mirror of letter-writers. But VOL. I.

B

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