'Held in bondage'; or, Granville de Vigne, by Ouida, Band 2

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Seite 96 - All things are taken from us, and become Portions and parcels of the dreadful past. Let us alone. What pleasure can we have To war with evil? Is there any peace In ever climbing up the climbing wave? 95 All things have rest, and ripen toward the grave In silence— ripen, fall and cease: Give us long rest or death, dark death, or dreamful ease.
Seite 16 - There is somewhat touching in the madness with which the passing age mischooses the object on which all candles shine and all eyes are turned; the care with which it registers every trifle touching Queen Elizabeth and King James, and the Essexes, Leicesters, Burleighs and Buckinghams; and lets pass without a single valuable note the founder of another dynasty, which alone will cause the Tudor dynasty to be remembered,— the man who carries the...
Seite 76 - ... in Scotland. I should be very ungrateful, if I were not thankful for such kindness and friendship. As to my subscribing to the substance of the Westminster Confession, there would be no difficulty ; and as to the Presbyterian government, I have long been...
Seite 169 - Oh, Love! what is it in this world of ours Which makes it fatal to be loved? Ah why With cypress branches hast thou wreathed thy bowers, And made thy best interpreter a sigh? As those who dote on odours pluck the flowers, And place them on their breast — but place to die — Thus the frail beings we would fondly cherish Are laid within our bosoms but to perish.
Seite 61 - Amor, che a nullo amato amar perdona, Mi prese del costui piacer si forte, Che, come vedi, ancor non m'abbandona. Amor condusse noi ad una morte : Caina attende chi a vita ci spense.
Seite 151 - As he put his arm round her, and whirled her into the circle, he remembered, with a shudder at the memory, that the last woman he had waltzed with was the Trefusis. In India wilder sports and more exciting amusements had filled his time, and since he had been in England he had chiefly frequented men's society. ' You had my note, Sir Folko ?' was Alma's first question. ' I could never thank you for your beautiful gifts, I could never tell you what happiness they gave me.' ' You have said far more...
Seite 223 - ... enough to tame its fever down and chill his veins into ice-water. Still he lingered, not master of himself. The man's nature, alive and vigorous, rebelled against the stoicism he had thought to graft upon it, and flung off the cold and alien bonds of the chill philosophy circumstances had taught him to adopt. His heart was made for passionate joys; and against reason it demanded its rights and clamoured for his freedom. He lingered there loth— who can marvel ?—to close upon himself the golden...
Seite 230 - He needed no words to tell he was loved ; between them now there was an eloquence compared to which all speech is dumb. The glowing golden sunlight shone on them where they stood, two human beings formed for each other's joy. To those who condemn him, all I answer is, " Those whom God hath joined together let no man put asunder...
Seite 201 - I will not woo her in her extreme youth to a path which in maturer years she may live to regret and long to retrace. I will not do it. If I have not spared any other woman in my life, I will spare her. But, at the same time, I will not be parted from her utterly ; I will not be compelled to forsake her in the hour of suffering I have brought upon her. As long as she loves me I will not entirely surrender her to you or to any other man. You judge rightly ; I dare not be with her long. God help me...
Seite 261 - That quick scepticism which one betrayal had engrafted on a nature naturally trusting and unsuspicious, never permitted him to pause, to weigh, to reflect ; with the rapidity of vehement and jealous passion, from devoted faith in the woman he loved, he turned to hideous disbelief in her, and classed her recklessly and madly with the vilest and the falsest of her sex. Of no avail the thousand memories of Alma's childlike purity and truth which one moment's thought would have summoned up in her defence,...

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