History of Oratory and Orators: A Study of the Influence of Oratory Upon Politics and Literature

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G. P. Putnam's sons, 1896
 

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Seite 382 - Not as the conqueror comes They, the true-hearted, came ; Not with the roll of the stirring drums, And the trumpet that sings of fame. Not as the flying come, In silence and in fear ; — They shook the depths of the desert gloom, With their hymns of lofty cheer.
Seite 332 - Mr President, it is natural to man to indulge in the illusions of hope. We are apt to shut our eyes against a painful truth, and listen to the song of that siren till she transforms us into beasts. Is this the part of wise men, engaged in a great and arduous struggle for liberty?
Seite 130 - English communion that gives all their life and efficacy to them. It is the spirit of the English constitution which, infused through the mighty mass, pervades, feeds, unites, invigorates, vivifies, every part of the empire, even down to the minutest member.
Seite 405 - Let their last feeble and lingering glance rather behold the gorgeous ensign of the republic, now known and honored throughout the earth, still full high advanced, its arms and trophies streaming in their original lustre, not a stripe erased or polluted, nor a single star obscured, bearing for its motto no such miserable interrogatory as "What is all this worth?
Seite 408 - Ah! gentlemen, that was a dreadful mistake. Such a secret can be safe nowhere. The whole creation of God has neither nook nor corner where the guilty can bestow it, and say it is safe.
Seite 402 - And, sir, where American liberty raised its first voice, and where its youth was nurtured and sustained, there It still lives, in the strength of its manhood and full of its original spirit.
Seite 334 - What terms shall we find which have not already been exhausted? Let us not, I beseech you, sir, deceive ourselves longer. Sir, we have done everything that could be done, to avert the storm which is now coming on. We have petitioned, we have remonstrated, we have supplicated, we have prostrated ourselves before the throne, and have implored its interposition to arrest the tyrannical hands of the ministry and parliament. Our petitions have been slighted, our remonstrances have produced additional...
Seite 333 - Are we disposed to be of the number of those who, having eyes, see not, and having ears, hear not the things which so nearly concern their temporal salvation? For my part, whatever anguish of spirit it may cost, I am willing to know the whole truth; to know the worst, and to provide for it. 2. I have but one lamp by which my feet are guided, and that is the lamp of experience.
Seite 330 - Caesar had his Brutus — Charles the First his Cromwell — and George the Third — [" Treason " cried the Speaker ; " treason ! treason ! " echoed from every part of the house.
Seite 333 - Ask yourselves how this gracious reception of our petition comports with those warlike preparations which cover our waters and darken our land. Are fleets and armies necessary to a work of love and reconciliation? Have we shown ourselves so unwilling to be reconciled that force must be called in to win back our love?

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