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A TALE

OF THE GREAT REBELLION.

BY MRS. THOMSON,

AUTHOR OF

" WIDOWS AND WIDOWERS ;” “ ANN

BOLEYN,” ETC.

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RICHARD BENTLEY. NEW

INTRODUCTION.

The reader who is well acquainted with the disastrous period of the great Rebellion, will perceive that the main incidents of this work are based upon history. The siege of Wardour, which forms so prominent a feature in my tale"; the events near Basing House, and the destruction of Ragland Castle, derive any interest which they may possess in these volumes, from the truth of their details, rather than from the fiction with which they are interwoven.

For some anachronisms there must be indulgence claimed from the critic—(and who is not now a critic?)—who may think it worth while to peruse a composition VOL. I.

a 3

which scarcely aspires to the dignity of an historical romance, and may more strictly be termed " A Tale of the Great Rebellion.” The characters which are described are mostly real — although, in some instances, made to act a different part to that which they performed in life. Those conversations in which Charles the First and his loyal subject the first Marquis of Worcester are introduced, owe much to a little book, now seldom read, but very curious, entitled “ Apophthegms by James I., Charles I., and the Marquis of Worcester."

London, March 15th, 1843.

RAGLAND CASTLE.

CHAPTER I.

How love came in, I do not know,
Whether by th' eye, or ear, or no;
Or whether with the soul it came,
At first, infused with the same;
Whether in part, 'tis here or there,
Or, like the soul, whole every where,
This troubles me; but I, as well
As any other, this can tell,-
That when from hence she does depart,
The outlet then is from the heart.

Herrick.

The ancient castle of Wardour, seated under a natural amphitheatre of hills, surrounded by woods, and commanding extensive and beautiful views, is now a mass of ruins, clothed with ivy. Few traces remain of that baronial splendour which characterised this dwelling of an honoured family, the Arundels of Wardour. The destructive force of a merciless power has

VOL. I.

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