The Works of the Right Honourable Edmund Burke, Band 5

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C. and J. Rivington, 1815
 

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Seite 153 - It is now sixteen or seventeen years since I saw the queen of France, then the dauphiness, at Versailles; and surely never lighted on this orb, which she hardly seemed to touch, a more delightful vision.
Seite 154 - It is gone, that sensibility of principle, that chastity of honour, which felt a stain like a wound, which inspired courage whilst it mitigated ferocity, which ennobled whatever it touched, and under which vice itself lost half its evil, by losing all its grossness.
Seite 153 - Little did I dream, when she added titles of veneration to those of enthusiastic, distant, respectful love, that she should ever be obliged to carry the sharp antidote against disgrace concealed in that bosom ; little did I dream...
Seite 302 - He that wrestles with us strengthens our nerves, and sharpens our skill. Our antagonist is our helper. This amicable conflict with difficulty obliges us to an intimate acquaintance with our object, and compels us to consider it in all its relations. It will not suffer us to be superficial.
Seite 155 - All the pleasing illusions, which made power gentle, and obedience liberal, which harmonized the different shades of life, and which, by a bland assimilation, incorporated into politics the sentiments which beautify and soften private society, are to be dissolved by this new conquering empire of light and reason. All the decent drapery of life is to be rudely torn off.
Seite 222 - But to be restless in a worse extreme? And for that lethargy was there no cure, But to be cast into a calenture; Can knowledge have no bound, but must advance So far, to make us wish for ignorance?
Seite 127 - Government is a contrivance of human wisdom to provide for human wants. Men have a right that these wants should be provided for by this wisdom.
Seite 83 - By a constitutional policy, working after the pattern of nature, we receive, we hold, we transmit our government and our privileges, in the same manner in which we enjoy and transmit our property and our lives.
Seite 222 - Of sacrilege, must bear Devotion's name. No crime so bold but would be understood A real, or at least, a seeming good. Who fears not to do ill, yet fears the name, And, free from conscience, is a slave to fame. Thus he the church at once protects and spoils ; But princes' swords are sharper than their styles : And thus to th' ages past he makes amends, Their charity destroys, their faith defends.
Seite 84 - In this choice of inheritance we have given to our frame of polity the image of a relation in blood; binding up the constitution of our country with our dearest domestic ties; adopting our fundamental laws into the bosom of our family affections; keeping inseparable, and cherishing with the warmth of all their combined and mutually reflected charities, our state, our hearths, our sepulchres, and our altars.

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