The wild garland; or, Curiosities of poetry, selected by I.J. Reeve, Band 1

Cover
 

Was andere dazu sagen - Rezension schreiben

Es wurden keine Rezensionen gefunden.

Ausgewählte Seiten

Andere Ausgaben - Alle anzeigen

Häufige Begriffe und Wortgruppen

Beliebte Passagen

Seite 115 - Even such is Time, which takes in trust Our youth, our joys, and all we have, And pays us but with age and dust ; Who in the dark and silent grave, When we have wandered all our ways, Shuts up the story of our days : And from which earth, and grave, and dust, The Lord shall raise me up, I trust.
Seite 149 - At thirty man suspects himself a fool ; Knows it at forty, and reforms his plan ; At fifty chides his infamous delay, Pushes his prudent purpose to resolve; In all the magnanimity of thought Resolves and re-resolves; then dies the same.
Seite 120 - And hitting and splitting, And shining and twining, And rattling and battling, And shaking and quaking, And pouring and roaring, And waving and raving...
Seite 120 - Sounds and motions forever and ever are blending, All at once and all o'er, with a mighty uproar, — And this way the water comes down at Lodore.
Seite 147 - Eugh, obedient to the benders will ; The Birch for shaftes ; the Sallow for the mill ; The Mirrhe sweete-bleeding in the bitter wound ; The warlike Beech ; the Ash for nothing ill ; The fruitful! Olive ; and the Platane round ; The carver Holme ; the Maple seeldom inward sound.
Seite 120 - Dividing and gliding and sliding, And falling and brawling and sprawling, And driving and riving and striving, And sprinkling and twinkling and wrinkling, And sounding...
Seite 108 - I'll tell a tale — B. Agreed. P. Where London's column, pointing at the skies, Like a tall bully, lifts the head, and lies...
Seite 19 - GOD bless the king, I mean the faith's defender; God bless — no harm in blessing — the pretender; But who pretender is, or who is king, God bless us all — that's quite another thing.
Seite 134 - Where some, like magistrates, correct at home, Others, like merchants, venture trade abroad, Others, like soldiers, armed in their stings, Make boot upon the summer's velvet buds, Which pillage they with merry march bring home To the tent-royal of their emperor ; Who, busied in his majesty, surveys The singing masons building roofs of gold, The civil citizens kneading up the honey, The poor mechanic porters crowding in Their heavy burdens at his narrow gate, The sad-eyed justice, with his surly hum,...
Seite 137 - A woman, having a settlement, married a man with none ; The question was, he being dead, if that she had was gone. Quoth Sir John Pratt : ' Her settlement suspended did remain, Living the husband ; but, him dead, it doth revive again.

Bibliografische Informationen