Bacon; the Advancement of Learning

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Clarendon Press, 1876 - 376 Seiten
 

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Seite 279 - In sooth, I know not why I am so sad : It wearies me ; you say it wearies you ; But how I caught it, found it, or came by it, What stuff 'tis made of, whereof it is born, I am to learn ; And such a want-wit sadness makes of me, That I have much ado to know myself.
Seite 285 - Have gloz^d, but superficially ; not much Unlike young men, whom Aristotle thought Unfit to hear moral philosophy. The reasons you allege do more conduce To the hot passion of...
Seite 210 - But men if they be in their own power and do bear and sustain themselves, and be not carried away with a whirlwind or tempest of ambition, ought in the pursuit of their own fortune to set before their eyes not only that general map of the world, that all things are vanity and vexation of spirit...
Seite 294 - Then gin I thinke on that which Nature sayd, Of that same time when no more Change shall be, But stedfast rest of all things, firmely stayd Upon the pillours of Eternity, That is contrayr to Mutabilitie ; For all that moveth doth in Change delight : But thence-forth all shall rest eternally With Him that is the God of Sabaoth hight : O ! that great Sabaoth God, grant me that Sabaoths sight ! COMPLAINT OF THALIA (COMEDY).
Seite lviii - For the wit and mind of man, if it work upon matter, which is the contemplation of the creatures of God, worketh according to the stuff, and is limited thereby, but if it work upon itself, as the spider worketh his web, then it is endless, and brings forth indeed cobwebs of learning, admirable for the fineness of thread and work but of no substance or profit.
Seite 212 - Spiritus intus alit: totamque infusa per artus ' Mens agitat molem, et magno se corpore miscet ' Inde hominum pecudumque genus vitaeque volantum ' Et quae marmoreo fert monstra sub aequore pontus.
Seite 69 - The use of this feigned history hath been to give some shadow of satisfaction to the mind of man in those points wherein the nature of things doth deny it...
Seite 273 - Therefore the winds, piping to us in vain, As in revenge, have suck'd up from the sea Contagious fogs ; which falling in the land Have every pelting river made so proud, That they have overborne their continents...
Seite 53 - THE parts of human learning have reference to the three parts of man's Understanding, which is the seat of learning : History to his Memory, Poesy to his Imagination, and Philosophy to his Reason.
Seite 85 - Dens a principio usque ad fnem, the summary law of nature, we know not whether man's inquiry can attain unto it. But these three be the true stages of knowledge, and are to them that are depraved no better than the giants' hills : Ter sunt conati imponere Pelio Ossam, Scilicet, atque Ossae frondosum involvere Olympum.

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