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CHAPTER X.

OF RETENTION.

SECT.

1. Contemplation.
2. Memory.

3. Attention, repetition, pleasure, and pain, fix ideas. 4,5. Ideas fade in the memory

6. Constantly repeated ideas can scarce be lost.

7. In remembering, the mind is often active 8, 9. Two defects in the memory, oblivion and slowness. 10. Brutes have memory.

CHAPTER XI.

OF DISCERNING, &c.
SECT.

1. No knowledge without it.
2. The difference of wit and judgment..
3. Clearness alone hinders confusion.
4. Comparing.
5. Brutes compare but imperfectly.
6. Compounding.
7. Brutes compound but little.
8. Naming.

9. Abstraction.
10, 11, Brutes abstract not.

13. Idiots and madmen.
14. Method.
15. These are the beginnings of human knowledge.
16. Appeal to experience.
17. Dark room

CHAPTER XII.

OF COMPLEX IDEAS.
SECT.

1. Made by the mind out of simple ones.
2. Made voluntarily.
3. Are either modes, substances, or relations.
4. Modes.
5. Simple and mixed modes.
6. Substances single or collective.
7. Relation
8. The abstrusest ideas from the two sources.

CHAPTER XIII.

OF SPACE AND ITS SIMPLE MODES.
SECT.

1. Simple modes.
2. Idea of space.
3. Space and extension.

4. Immensity. 05, 6. Figure.

7–10. Place. 11-14. Extension and body not the same. ? ..?

E: 15. The definition of extension, or of space, does not explain it. . 16. Division of beings into bodies and spirits proves not body

sloj i and space the same. 17, 18. Substance, which we know not, no proof against space

without body.
19, 20. Substance and accidents of little use in philosophy.

21. A vacuum beyond the utmost bounds of body. '
22. The power of annihilation proves a vacuum.

23. Motion proves a vacuum. S24. The ideas of space and body distinct. But it and in 25, 26. Extension being inseparable from body, proves it not the

same.
27. Ideas of space and solidity distinct.
28. Men differ little in clear simple ideas.

CHAPTER XIV.

OF DURATION AND ITS SIMPLE MODES.
SEÇT.

1. Duration is fleeting extension. w ipos
8-4. Its idea from reflection on the train of our ideas. ]

5. The idea of duration applicable to things whilst we sleep. 6-8. The idea of succession not from motion... 9-11. The train of ideas has a certain degree of quickness. 19. 12. This train the measure of other successions. 1315. The mind cannot fix long on one invariable idea.

16. Ideas, however made, include no sense of motion,
17. Time is duration set out by measures.
18. A good measure of time must divide its whole duration

into equal periods.
19. The revolutions of the sun and moon the properest mea-

sures of time. 20. But not by their motion, but periodical appearances. 21. No two parts of duration can be certainly known to be equal. 22. Time not the measure of motion. 23. Minutes, hours, and years not necessary measures of du

ration. 24–26. Our measure of time applicable to duration before time. 27-30. Eternity.

CHAPTER XV.

OF DURATION AND EXPANSION CONSIDERED TOGETHER.

SECT.

1. Both capable of greater and less.
2. Expansion not bounded by matter.
3. Nor duration by motion.
4. Why men more easily admit infinite duration than infinite

expansion.
5. Time to duration is as place to expansion.
6. Time and place are taken for so much of either as are set

out by the existence and motion of bodies. 7. Sometimes for so much of either as we design by measure

taken from the bulk or motion of bodies. 8. They belong to all beings. .- 9. All the parts of extension are extension; and all the parts

of duration are duration. 10. Their parts inseparable. 11. Duration is as a line, expansion as a solid. 12. Duration has never two parts together, expansion all

together.

CHAPTER XVI.

OF NUMBER.

SECT.

1. Number, the simplest and most universal idea.
2. Its modes made by addition.
3. Each mode distinct.

4. Therefore demonstrations in numbers the most precise. 5, 6. Names necessary to numbers.

7. Why children number not earlier.
8. Number measures all measurables.

CHAPTER XVII.

OF INFINITY. SECT. 1. Infinity in its original intentions attributed to space,

duration, and number. 2. The idea of finite easily got. 3. How we come by the idea of infinity. 4. Our idea of space boundless. 5. And so of duration. 6. Why other ideas are not capable of infinity. 7. Difference between infinity of space and space infinite. 8. We have no idea of infinite space. 9. Number affords us the clearest idea of infinity.

10,11. Our different conception of the infinity of number, dura

tion, and expansion. · 12. Infinite divisibility. 13, 14. No positive idea of infinity. 15, 19. What is positive, what negative, in our idea of infinite. 16, 17. We have no positive idea of infinite duration.

18. No positive idea of infinite space.
20. Some think they have a positive idea of eternity, and not

of infinite space.
21. Supposed positive idea of infinity, cause of mistakes.
22. All these ideas from sensation and reflection.

CHAPTER XVIII.

OF OTHER SIMPLE MODES.
SECT.
1, 2. Modes of motion.

3. Modes of sounds.
4. Modes of colours.
5. Modes of tastes and smells.
6. Some simple modes have no names.
7. Why some modes have, and others have not names.

CHAPTER XIX.

OF THE MODES OF THINKING.
SECT.
1, 2. Sensation, remembrance, contemplation, &c.

3. The various attention of the mind in thinking.
4. Hence it is probable that thinking is the action, not
essence of the soul.

CHAPTER XX.

OF MODES OF PLEASURE AND PAIN. SECT.

1. Pleasure and pain simple ideas. 2. Good and evil, what. 3. Our passions moved by good and evil. 4. Love. 5. Hatred. 6. Desire. 7. Joy. 8. Sorrow. 9. Hope. 10. Fear. 11. Despair. 12. Anger. 13. Envy. VOL. I.

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14. What passions all men have. 15, 16. Pleasure and pain, what.

17. Shame.
18. These instances do show how our ideas of the passions are

got from sensation and reflection.

CHAPTER XXI.

OF POWER,
SECT.

1. This idea how got.
2. Power active and passive.
3. Power includes relation.
4. The clearest idea of active power had from spirit.
5. Will and understanding, two powers.
6. Faculties.
7. Whence the ideas of liberty and necessity.
8. Liberty, what.
9. Supposes understanding and will.
10. Belongs not to volition.
11. Voluntary opposed to involuntary, not to necessary.
12. Liberty, what.

13. Necessity, what.
1420. Liberty belongs not to the will.

21. But to the agent or man.
22-24. In respect of willing, a man is not free.
25—27. The will determined by something without it.

28. Volition, what.
29. What determines the will.
30. Will and desire must not be confounded.
31. Uneasiness determines the will.
32. Desire is uneasiness.
33. The uneasiness of desire determines the will.
34. This the spring of action.
35. The greatest positive good determines not the will, but

uneasiness.
36. Because the removal of uneasiness is the first step to

happiness. 37. Because uneasiness alone is present. 38. Because all, who allow the joys of heaven possible, pursue

them not. But a great uneasiness is never neglected. 39. Desire accompanies all uneasiness. 40. The most pressing uneasiness naturally determines the will. 41. All desire happiness. 42. Happiness, what. 43. What good is desired, what not. 44. Why the greatest good is not always desired. 45. Why, not being desired, it moves not the will. 46. Due consideration raises desire.

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