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appraised at $74,287.45. They were ceded by the State March 26, 1872, to the "Ohio Agricultural and Mechanical College."

LAND BOUNTIES, WAR OF 1812 WITH GREAT BRITAIN.

Congress, December 24, 1811, January 11, 1812, and February 6, 1812, promised land bounties for services in the Army of the United States. These acts were to increase the existing military establishment. The first promised a bounty in lands, for five years' service, of 160 acres to each non-commissioned officer or soldier, to go to his heirs and representatives if he was killed in action or died in the service. In the second act, for raising certain regiments of infantry, artillery, and dragoons, the same bounty in lands was provided. These were for the permanent army. The act of February 6, 1812, gave authority to the President to call out 50,000 volunteers for twelve months. By this act the heirs of any non-commissioned officer or soldier who might be killed or die in the service were to receive 160 acres of land.

By the provisions of the act of May 6, 1812, land, not exceeding 6,000,000 ot acres, was directed to be surveyed, reserved, and set apart for the purpose of satisfying the land bounties promised by the acts above set out; 2,000,000 acres to be surveyed in the then Territory of Michigan, 2,000,000 in the Illinois Territory, and 2,000,000 in the Territory of Louisiana, between the river St. Francis and the river Arkansas.

By the subsequent act of Congress approved April 29, 1816, it was declared that 80 much of the act of May 6, 1812, as directed that 2,000,000 acres should be surveyed, &c., in the Territory of Michigan, should be repealed, and that in lieu thereof 1,500,000 acres should be laid off in the Illinois Territory, and 500,000 acres in the Missouri Territory, north of the river Missouri. The great mass of warrants issued for that service has been satisfied under a lottery system, by locations in Illinois, Arkansas, and Missouri. The issue of such warrants, however, ceased 25th June, 1858, by limitation, in the act of 8th February, 1854, and even the right to locate them expired 220 June, 1863, that being the limitation fixed by the aforesaid act of 220 June, 1860.

The warrants for services in the war of 1812 could only be laid upon tracts in the six million acres embraced in the “military districts of Illinois, Missouri, or Arkansas.” Subsequently, in virtue of the act of July 27, 1842, reviving authority for the issue of warrants for services in the revolution and war of 1812, all military land warrants could be located upon any of the public lands “subject to sale at private entry."

"MILITARY RESERVATIONS" OF PORTIONS OF THE PUBLIC DOMAIN FOR SATISFYING

LAND BOUNTIES. The object of the “military reservation" system, or allotting a special tract or region of land or country to the satisfaction of a specific bounty grant made by Congress, was to induce settlement and cultivation in those localities by the soldier. The then remoteness of those districts from the great centers of population, the Eastern and Middle States, defeated the object, leaving the patented lands to pass into the hands of speculators, or become liable to forfeiture for non-payment of State taxes. These results led to the abandonment of the system, and to the extension of the privilege to the soldier or his assignee to select in satisfaction of the warrant any lands of the United States subject to private entry.

The soldier was still further benefited and protected by a stipulation existing in all the bounty-land laws prohibiting the seizure or sale by legal process of the warrant to pay any debt contracted prior to the issue of patent for the land selected, and all sales, letters of attorney, or written instruments affecting the title to the warrants executed prior to the issue thereof, are declared to be null and void, thus effectually securing to the soldier, if so disposed, a home for himself and family.

WARRANTS FOR SERVICES IN THE WAR OF 1812.

For services in the war of 1812 with Great Britain, there have been issued, pursuant to the act of May 6, 1812, and supplements, 29,186 warrants, embracing an aggregate of 4,853,600 acres. For nearly all of these, patents have been issued to the individual warrantees or their heirs, in tracts, the greater portion of one hundred and sixty acres each, and the residue, or double bounties, of three hundred and twenty acres.

This includes the allowances to the inhabitants of the province of Canada who joined the armies of the United States, and served in the war against Great Britain. (See act of March 5, 1816.)

WARRANTS FOR SERVICES IN WAR WITH MEXICO.

The war with Mexico was proclaimed on the 13th of May, 1846, and on the 11th of February, 1847, an act was passed giving bounties for military service. It ordered that non-commissioned officers, musicians, and privates who served in the war with Mexico in the volunteer army of the United States for twelve months, or who should be discharged for wounds or sickness prior to the end of that time, or in case of his death while in the service, then his heirs should receive a certificate or warrant from the War Department for the quantity of 160 acres of land, the same to be entered at any district land office on lands open to private entry; the certificate to be returned to the General Land Office, and patent to issue therefor.

There was in this act a provision for acceptance by applicant of a Treasury scrip for $100 at 6 per cent, interest in lieu of 160 acres of land. Those who served less than twelve months on like terms as to death or discharge for wounds were to receive each a warrant for 40 acres of land, or a Treasury scrip for $25, if preferred. The privileges of bounty lands were extended by the act of September 28, 1850, granting an 80-acre warrant, and relating to services in all the Indian wars since 1790, the war of 1812, and to the commissioned officers in the war with Mexico; by act of March 22, 1852, making land warrants assignable, and extending the provisions of the act of September 28, 1850, and by the act of March 3, 1855.

This last act made 120-acre, 100-acre, 60-acre, and 10-acre warrants, and extended the bounty-land privilege so as to make the entire classes receiving the same some 32 in number, in the Army, Navy, and elsewhere. It was a comprehensive act, embracing almost all the wars the United States had participated in. It granted to all officers and soldiers who had served in any war in which our country had been engaged, from the revolution to the 3d March, 1855, 160 acres each, or so much, with what had been previously allowed, as would make up that quantity. It extended the concession to a service of only fourteen days or an engagement in a single battle, and, in case of death, to the widow or minor children. (See Mayo & Moulton's Pension and Bounty-land Laws; see circular to registers and receivers, General Land Office, July 20, 1875, respecting the location and assignment of bounty-land warrants.)

TOTAL NUMBER OF WARRANTS ISSUED FOR MEXICAN WAR.

The total number of warrants issued under these several acts to June 30, 1880, has been 551,193, containing 61,028,430 acres (see statement, also showing outstanding warrants and areas), or more than twice the area of the State of Ohio or Pennsylvania, and a million of acres more in area than all the New England States with the addition of New Jersey, Delaware, and Maryland.

All military bounty-land warrants under general laws are issued by the Commissioner of Pensions. After location they are forwarded to the General Land Office for examination and approval. After approval patents are issued from the General Land Office for the land.

Thousands of land bounties have been granted by special acts of Congress growing out of the wars prior to 1861, and not herein specifically set out. (See Statutes.)

For existing laws upon this subject see chapter X, title “Bounty Lands”; also secs. 2414 to 2446, R. S.

REVOLUTIONARY WAR AND WAR OF 1812.

The following statement exhibits the warrants in acres issued under several acts of Congress for the Revolutionary war and war of 1812:

Acres. Revolutionary war: Act of September 16, 1776....

2,095, 220 Act of February 18, 1801.......

58,260 Act of March 3, 1803......

11,520

— 2, 165,000 War of 1812: Act of May 6, 1812.....

4,853, 600 Act of March 5, 1816.................................

76,592

4,930 192 Total .........................

.... 7,095, 192 The following exhibit shows the amount of “scrip” issued by the United States to claimants, in lieu of land warrants for military service, to June 30, 1880 :

Scrip” in lieu of land warrants.

Acres. Act of May 30, 1830..

393, 293 Act of July 13, 1832...

300,000 Act of March 2, 1833....

200,000 Act of March 3, 1835.

585, 000 Act of August 31, 1852

.. 1,041, 976 Act of June 5, 1858 ..

6,6669 Act of February 9, 1863....

11, 904 Act of July 2, 1862 ..

.... 9,600,000 It will be noted that the several acts of Congress on and after May 6, 1812, making changes or alterations in the then existing laws, from time to time, down to July 2, 1862, generally presented as curative acts, and with the intention of covering existing cases of hardship, always resulted in the increase of the land-bounty class, and further depleted the public domain.

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LOCATIONS OF WARRANTS FOR YEAR TO JUNE 30, 1880.

Statement of the total number of acres located at the various United States district land

offices with military-bounty land warrants issued under the acts of 1847, 1850, 1052, and 1855, in the several land States and Territories, for the year ending June 30, 1880.

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Alabama
Arkansas ...
Arizona ...
California.......
Colorado.........
Dakota.........
Florida ........
Kansas ............
Louisiana .........
Michigan .........
Minnesota...
Mississippi.........
Missouri ............
Nebraska..
New Mexico.....
Oregon....................
Utah
Washington ..................

10, 280 1,340 9, 640

720 11,400

1,040 41,560 2,760

320

200 3, 600

160 680 360 280

Total acres...
Warrants outstanding (22,202) not located ................

........ 84,540

2,535,940

BOUNTY LAND GRANTS—NUMBER OF WARRANTS AND ACRES.

The following table shows the bounty-land grants under the acts of 1847, 1850, 1852, and 1855, which included nearly all the wars the United States has been engaged in, and all operations thereunder to June 30, 1880:

Statement, under acts of 1847, 1850, 1852, and 1855, showing the issues and locations with bounty-land warrants, and the number outstanding, from the commencement of operations under said acts to June 30, 1880.

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CHAPTER X V.

TWO, THREE, AND FIVE PER CENT. FUNDS.

GRANTS TO STATES OF PORTION OF NET PROCEEDS FROM SALES. Congress, by several acts of dates given below, granted and allowed to the several States containing public lands, with the exception of California, two, three, and five per cent. upon the net proceeds of the sales of public lands therein. These allowances were in lieu of State taxation of United States public lands within said States, and in many instances took effect from the date of admission into the Union.

Per cente
Alabama, September 4,1841, and March 2, 1855...
Mississippi, September 4, 1841 .......
Missouri, February 28, 1859.........
Ohio, April 30, 1802, and June 30, 1802 .....
Indiana, February 1, 1816, and April 19, 1816
· Mississippi, March 1, 1817, and July 4, 1836.

Illinois, April 18, 1818........
Missouri, March 6, 1820.......
Alabama, March 2, 1819, and July 4, 1836..
Louisiana, act February 20, 1811..
Michigan, June 23, 1836....
Arkansas, June 23, 1836...
Florida, March 3, 1845........
Iowa, March 3, 1845, and December 28, 1846.......
Iowa, March 2, 1849.... ....
· Colorado, March 3, 1875......
· Nebraska, April 19, 1864.........
Nevada, March 21, 1864.......
Oregon, February 14, 1859....
Minnesota, February 26, 1857, and May 11, 1858 ........
Wisconsin, August 6, 1846, and May 29, 1848....
Statement of the amounts which have accrued to the following named States on account of the
two, three, and five per cent. upon the net proceeds of the sales of public lands to June 30,
1880, inclusive.

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