The apophthegmes of Erasmus, tr. by N. Udall

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Seite 467 - For he who fights and runs away May live to fight another day ; But he who is in battle slain Can never rise and fight again.
Seite 18 - In their lowest servitude and depression, the subjects of the Byzantine throne were still possessed of a golden key that could unlock the treasures of antiquity; of a musical and prolific language, that gives a soul to the objects of sense, and a body to the abstractions of philosophy.
Seite 461 - Lastly, leaving the vulgar arguments that by learning man excelleth man in that wherein man excelleth beasts ; that by learning man ascendeth to the heavens and their motions, where in body he cannot come, and the like : let us conclude with the dignity and excellency of knowledge and learning in that whereunto man's nature doth mos't aspire, which is, immortality or continuance : for to this tendeth generation, and raising of houses and families ; to this...
Seite 412 - From Paul's I went, to Eton sent, To learn straightways the Latin phrase, Where fifty-three stripes given to me At once I had. For fault but small, or none at all, It came to pass thus beat I was; See, Udal, see the mercy of thee To me, poor lad.
Seite 415 - And that learning should take up too much time or leisure : I answer ; the most active or busy man, that hath been or can be, hath, no question, many vacant times of leisure, while he expecteth the tides and returns of business (except he be either tedious and of no despatch, or lightly and unworthily ambitious to meddle in things that may be better done by others...
Seite 429 - HE that hath wife and children hath given hostages to fortune ; for they are impediments to great enterprises, either of virtue or mischief. Certainly the best works, and of greatest merit for the public, have proceeded from the unmarried or childless men ; which both in affection and means have married and endowed the public.
Seite 422 - And in hymself he lough right at the wo Of hem that wepten for his deth so faste...
Seite 28 - I put away envy, hate, pride, avarice, lust, I shall not see God. But a man is not damned because he cannot tell whether the Spirit has one principle or two. Has he the fruits of the Spirit? That is the question. Is he patient, kind, good, gentle, modest, temperate, chaste?
Seite 450 - A king can kill, a king can save ; A king can make a lord a knave ; And of a knave, a lord also." On this several new-made lords slank out of the room, which the king observing, told the marquess, " My lord, at this rate you will drive away all my nobility.
Seite 465 - Muse; She is too fair an hostess, 'twere a sin For them to like thine Inn: 'Twas made to entertain Guests of a nobler strain ; Yet if they will have any of thy store, Give them some scraps, and send them from thy door.

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