The Gallery of Portraits: With Memoirs ...

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C. Knight, 1834
 

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Seite 161 - He is a great lover and praiser of himself, a contemner and scorner of others, given rather to lose a friend than a jest, jealous of every word and action of those about him, (especially after drink, which is one of the elements in which he liveth...
Seite 9 - I have seen of them myself amongst reluctant nations submitting to our authority. I know what they feel, and how such feelings can alone be repressed. I have heard them in my youth from a naked savage, in the indignant character of a prince, surrounded by his subjects, addressing the governor of a British colony, holding a bundle of sticks in his hand as the notes of his unlettered eloquence.
Seite 62 - Hath left to their disputes, perhaps to move His laughter at their quaint opinions wide Hereafter; when they come to model heaven And calculate the stars, how they will wield The mighty frame; how build, unbuild, contrive To save appearances; how gird the sphere With centric and eccentric scribbled o'er, Cycle and epicycle, orb in orb.
Seite 177 - Chaucer) were of the Inner Temple ; for not many years since Master Buckley did see a record in the same house where Geoffry Chaucer was fined two shillings for beating a Franciscan Friar in Fleet Street.
Seite 158 - That the argument of his comedy might have been of some other nature, as of a duke to be in love with a countess, and that countess to be in love with the duke's son, and the son to love the lady's waiting-maid : some such cross wooing, with a clown to their servingman, better than to be thus near, and familiarly allied to the time.
Seite 157 - The Winter's Tale is sneered at by B. Jonson, in the induction to Bartholomew Fair, 1614: " If there be never a servant-monster in the fair, who can help it, nor a nest of Antiques ? He is loth to make nature afraid in his plays, like those that beget TALES, Tempests, and such like drolleries.
Seite 164 - Till then, our authors had no thoughts of writing on the model of the ancients : their Tragedies were only Histories in dialogue ; and their Comedies followed the thread of any novel as they found it, no less implicitly than if it had been true history.
Seite 107 - I could find the shorter path — fix forms and characters in my mind — and, instead of copying the lines, try to read the language, and, if possible, find the grammar of the art, by bringing into one focus the various observations I had made, and then trying by my power on the canvass how far my plan enabled me to combine and apply them to practice. For this purpose I considered what various ways, and to what different purposes, the memory might be applied ! and fell upon one most suitable to...
Seite 16 - The objection to Dollond's patent was, that he was not the inventor of the new method of making object-glasses, but that Dr. Hall had made the same discovery before him. But it was holden that as Dr. Hall had confined it to his closet, and the public were not acquainted with it, Dollond was to be considered as the inventor.
Seite 75 - He became the cushion exceedingly well : his manner of hearing patient, his directions pertinent, and his discourses copious and, although he hesitated often, fluent. His stop for a word, by the produce always paid for the delay ; and on some occasions, he would utter sentences heroic.

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