The Universal Magazine, Band 98

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Pub. for J. Hinton., 1796
 

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Seite 186 - Deform'd, unfinish'd, sent before my time Into this breathing world, scarce half made up, And that so lamely and unfashionable That dogs bark at me as I halt by them; Why, I, in this weak piping time of peace, Have no delight to pass away the time, Unless to spy my shadow in the sun And descant on mine own deformity; And therefore, since I cannot prove a lover, To entertain these fair well-spoken days, I am determined to prove a villain And hate the idle pleasures of these days.
Seite 337 - Is that poor man that hangs on princes' favours ! There is, betwixt that smile we would aspire to, That sweet aspect of princes, and their ruin, More pangs and fears than wars or women have; And when he falls, he falls like Lucifer, Never to hope again.
Seite 349 - ... (for there is no end of all the particulars of his glory) to bequeath all this with one word to his...
Seite 337 - This many summers in a sea of glory ; But far beyond my depth : my high-blown pride At length broke under me ; and now has left me, Weary, and old with service, to the mercy Of a rude stream, that must for ever hide me.
Seite 176 - How often have I blest the coming day, When toil remitting lent its turn to play, And all the village train, from labour free, Led up their sports beneath the spreading tree...
Seite 175 - ... the seller was to forfeit to the buyer the third part of its value. If any one stole or killed the cat that guarded the prince's granary, he was to forfeit a milch ewe, its fleece and lamb ; or as much wheat as, when poured on the cat suspended by its tail (the head touching the floor) would form a heap high enough to cover the tip of the former.
Seite 184 - The highlanders were compofed of a number of tribes called clans, each of which bore a different name, and lived upon the lands of a different chieftain. The members of every tribe were tied one to another, not only by the feudal but by the; patriarchal bond : for while the individuals which...
Seite 186 - A a a belief entertained univerfally among the lower clafs of Highlanders, that a war-horfe is taught to fight with his feet and his teeth.
Seite 185 - ID encampments, they were expert at Forming beds in a moment, by tying together bunches of heath, and fixing them upright in the ground; an art, which, as the beds were both foft and dry, preferved their health in the field, When other foldiers loft theirs.
Seite 185 - ... a competition in valour of clan with clan, of family with family, of brother with brother. To make an opening in regular troops, and to conquer, they reckoned the same thing, because in close engagements, and in broken ranks, no regular troops could withstand them.

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