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THE

R E MAINS

OF

THOMAS CRANMER, D. D.

ARCHBISHOP OF CANTERBURY.

COLLECTED AND ARRANGED

BY

THE REV. HENRY JENKYNS, M. A.

FELLOW OF ORIEL COLLEGE.

IN FOUR VOLUMES.

VOL. II.

OXFORD

AT THE UNIVERSITY PRESS.

MDCCCXXXIII.

[A

COLLECTION OF TENETS

EXTRACTED FROM

THE CANON LAW,

SHEWING

THE EXTRAVAGANT PRETENSIONS OF THE

CHURCH OF ROME a.]

a

bDist. 22: “Omnes.” De major. et obedient.: “ Solitæ.” Mss. StilExtrav. de majorit. et obedient. : Unam sanctam.”

lingfleet.

Lamb. libr. HE that knowledgeth not himself to be under the bishop 1107. of Rome, and that the bishop of Rome is ordained by God C. C.C.C.

CCCXL. P. [Burnet inserts these extracts under the year 1544, connecting 447. them with an act then passed “ for the examination of canon laws.” They are placed here on the authority of the following passage from Strype : " One of the first things wherein the archbishop shewed his good service to the church, was done in the parliament in the latter “ end of this year, 1533. When the supremacy came under debate, " and the usurped power of the bishop of Rome was propounded, then “ the old collections of the new archbishop did him good service; for “ the chief, and in a manner the whole burden of this weighty cause was laid

upon his shoulders.” Strype, Cranmer, p. 32. These “old “ collections” are probably those which are still preserved at Lainbeth under the title of Archbishop Cranmer's Collection of Laws. They were formed, perhaps, while he resided at Cambridge, and consist of a large number of passages, extracted at length from the canon law, and followed by that short summary of some of its most remarkable doctrines which is here printed. They were doubtless of great use in the discussions alluded to by Strype; but that was not the only nor the first occasion, in which they supplied the archbishop with arguments. He must have already availed himself of them, when in stating to the king his unwillingness to accept the see of Canterbury, he“ disclosed therewithal “the intolerable usurpation of the pope of Rome." See his Examination before Brokes. And he frequently recurs to them in his subsequent writings, particularly in the Answer to the Devonshire Rebels, 1549, and in his long Letter to queen Mary, in September, 1555.]

[These are references to the several parts of the Corpus Juris Canonici, from wbich the positions are extracted.]

b

B

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