1778 to 1784

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Bickers and son, 1784
 

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Seite 66 - Down with her, Burney ! — down with her! — spare her not! — attack her, fight her, and down with her at once! You are a rising wit, and she is at the top ; and when I was beginning the world, and was nothing and nobody, the joy of my life was to fire at all the established wits! and then everybody loved to halloo me on. But there is no game now...
Seite 540 - I prized every hour that went by, Beyond all that had pleased me before ; But now they are past, and I sigh, And I grieve that I prized them no more.
Seite 24 - they don't know when to abuse him, and when to praise him ; I will allow no man to speak ill of David that he does not deserve ; and as to Sir John, why really I believe him to be an honest man at the bottom: but to be sure he is penurious, and he is mean, and it must be owned he has a degree of brutality, and a tendency to savageness, that cannot easily be defended.
Seite 23 - I despise nothing that is good of its sort ; but I am too proud now to eat of it. Sitting by Miss Burney makes me very proud to-day !' ' Miss Burney,' said Mrs. Thrale, laughing, ' you must take great care of your heart if Dr. Johnson attacks it ; for I assure you he is not often successless.
Seite 117 - There are three distinct kind of judges upon all new authors or productions; the first are those who know no rules, but pronounce entirely from their natural taste and feelings; the second are those who know and judge by rules; and the third are those who know, but are above the rules. These last are those you should wish to satisfy. Next to them rate the natural judges; but ever despise those opinions that are formed by the rules.
Seite 576 - No; but he had seen a man, and knew, therefore, how to vary him to a monster. A man who would draw a monstrous cow, must first know what a cow commonly is ; or how can he tell that to give her an ass's head or an elephant's tusk will make her monstrous ? Suppose you...
Seite 24 - ... much older than he is ; for his face has had double the business of any other man's ; it is never at rest ; when he speaks one minute, he has quite a different countenance to what he assumes the next ; I don't believe he ever kept the same look for half an hour together in the whole course of his life ; and such an eternal, restless, fatiguing play of the muscles must certainly wear out a man's face before its real time.
Seite 172 - Adieu, my dear Daddy : I won't be mortified, and I won't be downed; but I will be proud to find I have, out of my own family, as well as in it, a friend who loves me well enough to speak plain truth to me.
Seite 549 - And how did Mrs. Montagu herself behave ? " "Very stately, indeed, at first. She turned from him very stiffly, and with a most distant air, and without even courtesying to him, and with a firm intention to keep to what she had publicly declared — that she would never speak to him more ! However, he went up to her himself, longing to begin ! and very roughly said, — ' Well, madam, what's become of your fine new house ? I hear no more of it...
Seite 63 - At tea-time the subject turned upon the domestic economy of Dr. Johnson's own household; Mrs. Thrale has often acquainted me that his house is quite filled and overrun with all sorts of strange creatures, whom he admits for mere charity, and because nobody else will admit them, — for his charity is unbounded,— or, rather, bounded only by his circumstances. The account he gave of the adventures and absurdities of the set, was highly diverting, but too diffused for writing, — though one or two...

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