A Treatise of the Law Relative to Merchant Ships & Seamen, in Six Parts: I. Of the Owners of Merchant Ships. II. Of the Board of Trade--local Marine Boards--mercantile Marine Offices and Naval Courts. III. Of the Persons Employed in the Navigation of Merchant Ships, and of the Conveyance of Passengers. IV. Of the Carriage of Goods in Merchant Ships. V. Of the Hiring and Wages of Merchant Seamen. VI. Of General Average--salvage--collision--and Maritime Liens

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Shaw and Sons, 1881 - 987 Seiten
 

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Seite 427 - India warrants ; warehouse keepers certificates ; warrants or orders for the delivery of goods, or any other documents used in the ordinary course of business as proof of the possession or control of goods, or authorizing or purporting to authorize, either by endorsement or by delivery, the possessor of such document to transfer or receive goods thereby represented...
Seite 580 - The vessels referred to in this Article shall not be obliged to carry the lights prescribed by Article 4 (a) and Article 11, last paragraph. Art. 8. Pilot vessels, when engaged on their station on pilotage duty, shall not show the lights required for other vessels, but shall carry a white light at the masthead, visible all round the horizon, and shall also exhibit a flare-up light or flare-up lights at short intervals, which shall never exceed fifteen minutes.
Seite 582 - ... which must, if both keep on their respective courses, pass clear of each other. The only cases to which it does apply are when each of two vessels is end on, or nearly end on, to the other; in other words, to cases in which, by day, each vessel sees the masts of the other in a line, or...
Seite 583 - In obeying and construing these Rules due regard shall be had to all dangers of navigation and collision, and to any special circumstances which may render a departure from the above Rules necessary in order to avoid immediate danger.
Seite 583 - I am directing my course to starboard." Two short blasts to mean, "I am directing my course to port.
Seite 269 - Every consignee of goods named in a bill of lading, and every indorsee of a bill of lading to whom the property in the goods therein mentioned shall pass, upon or by reason of such consignment or indorsement, shall have transferred to and vested in him all rights of suit, and be subject to the same liabilities in respect of such goods as if the contract contained in the bill of lading had been made with himself.
Seite 195 - The distinction is very clear, where mutual covenants go to the whole of the consideration on both sides, they are mutual conditions, the one precedent to the other. But where they go only to a part, where a breach may be paid for in damages, there the defendant has a remedy on his covenant, and shall not plead it as a condition precedent.
Seite 582 - ... to cases in which, by day, each vessel sees the masts of the other in a line, or nearly in a line, with her own; and by night, to cases in which each vessel is in such a position as to .see both the side lights of the other.
Seite 582 - ... (c.) When both are running free, with the wind on different sides, the vessel which has the wind on the port side shall keep out of the way of the other.
Seite 578 - ... points abaft the beam on the starboard side ; and of such a character as to be visible on a dark night, with a clear atmosphere, at a distance of at least two miles. (c.) On the...

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