Sporting Magazine, Band 8

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Rogerson & Tuxford, 1796
 

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Seite 127 - ... if they can be procured. The mud is always taken from the edge of the bank, or the bottom of the creek or pond near the door of the house; and though...
Seite 126 - ... eat their victuals, which they occasionally take out of the water. It frequently happens that some of the large houses are found to have one or more partitions, if they deserve that appellation ; but...
Seite 127 - ... during the winter; and as they are frequently seen to walk over their work, and sometimes to give a flap with their tail, particularly when plunging into the water, this has, without doubt, given...
Seite 243 - Frogs in a marsh, flies in a bottle, wind in a crevice, a preacher in a field, the drone of a bagpipe, all, all yielded to the inimitable and soporific monotony of Mr. Kemble...
Seite 127 - ... does, without having their tails bent forward between their legs; and which may not improperly be called their trencher. So far are the beaver from driving...
Seite 144 - I am endeavouring to profit, as far as I am able, in your company ; for having waited with impatience for the honour of being in an assembly of the greatest geniuses of this age, and at last having obtained the good fortune, I thought I could not do better than write down your conversation ; and indeed I have set down the substance of ' what hath been said for this hour or two.
Seite 244 - I have committed it to paper currente calamo. I mean no allusion, no epithet, to apply to him as a private individual. As a private individual, I give him not that notice which it might, here, be impertinent to bestow : but I have an undoubted right to discuss...
Seite 311 - ... each other's fingers. Various are the contrivances to which they are compelled to refort, in order to elude fufpicion ; and in no part of their lives do they evince more prudence than during their courtfhip.
Seite 127 - ... houses, that they lay most of the wood crosswise, and nearly horizontal, and without any other order than that of leaving a hollow or cavity in the middle. When any unnecessary branches project inward they cut them off with their teeth, and throw them in among the rest, to prevent the mud from falling through the roof. It is a mistaken notion that the wood-work is...
Seite 176 - Perillus ! He has bellowed, gentlemen, yea, he hath bellowed a dismal sound ! a hollow unvaried tone, heaved from his very midriff, and striking the listener with torpor ! Would I could pass the animal quietly for my own sake, and for his, by Jupiter ! I repeat it, I would not willingly harm the bull. I delight not in baiting him. I would jog as gently by him as by the ass that grazes on the common ; but he has obstinately blocked up my way ; he has already tossed and gored me severely. I must make...

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