The Chronicles of England, France, Spain, Etc

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E.P. Dutton & Company, 1906 - 616 Seiten
Represents a primary source of the history of the French Wars. In Froissart, we hear the gallant knights, of whom he wrote, arrange the terms of combat and the manner of the onset; we hear their soldiers cry their war-cries; we see them strike their horses with the spur; and the liveliness of the narration hurries us along with them into the whirlwind of battle.
 

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Seite 17 - As soon as the King of France came in sight of the English, his blood began to boil, and he cried out to his marshals, " Order the Genoese forward and begin the battle, in the name of God and St. Denis.
Seite 19 - Now, sir Thomas, return back to those that sent you and tell them from me, not to send again for me this day, or expect that I shall come, let what will happen, as long as my son has life; and say that I command them to let the boy win his spurs; for I am determined, if it please God, that all the glory and honour of this day shall be given to him, and to those into whose care I have entrusted him.
Seite 416 - The earl of Douglas had a long conflict with Sir Henry Percy, and in it, by gallantry of arms, won his pennon, to the great vexation of Sir Henry and the other English. The earl of Douglas...
Seite 423 - Douglas lay dead, for he had expired on giving his last orders, arrived at his banner, which was borne by Sir John Sinclair. Numbers were continually increasing, from the repeated shouts of Douglas, and the greater part of the Scottish knights and squires were now there.
Seite 23 - The king looked at her for some time in silence, and then said, 'Ah, lady, I wish you had been anywhere else than here: you have entreated in such a manner that I cannot refuse you; I therefore give them to you, to do as you please with them.
Seite 22 - Calais march out of the town with bare heads and feet, with ropes round their necks, and the keys of the town and castle in their hands. These six persons shall be at my absolute disposal, and the remainder of the inhabitants pardoned.
Seite 79 - The Prince, Don Pedro being present, took the banner in his hands, which was blazoned with a sharp stake gules, on a field argent ; after having cut off the tail to make it square, he displayed it, and, returning it to him by the handle, said, ' Sir John, I return you your banner, God give you strength and honour to preserve it.
Seite 20 - After he had said this, he took the bridle of the king's horse and led him off by force, for he had before entreated him to retire. The king rode on until he came to the castle of la Broyes, where he found the gates shut, for it was very dark. The king ordered the governor of it to be summoned. He came upon the battlements, and asked who it was that called at such an hour. The king answered, "Open, open, governor; it is the fortune of France.
Seite 20 - Lorraine, his brother-in-law, with their troops, made a gallant defence; but they were surrounded by a troop of English and Welsh, and slain in spite of their prowess. The earl of St Pol and the earl of Auxerre were also killed, as well as many others. Late after vespers, the king of France had not more about him than sixty men, every one included. Sir John of Hainault, who was of the number, had once remounted the king; for his horse had been killed under him by an arrow: he said to the king, 'Sir,...

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