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Where a malignant and a turban’d Turk Iod. O Sportan dog,
Beat a Venetian, and traduc’d the state, More fell than anguish, hunger, or the sea!
I took by the throat the circumcised dog, Look on the tragic loading of this bed; (To Iago,
And smote him—thus. [Stabs himself. This is thy work! the object poisons sight;-
Lord. O bloody period : Let it be hid' – Gratiano, keep the house,
Gra. All, that's spoke, is marr'd. And seize upon the fortunes of the Moor,
Oth. I kiss'd thee, ere I kill'd thee; — no way but For they succeed to you.--To you, lord governor,
this, [Falling upon Desdemona.|Remains the censure of this hellish villain;
Killing myself, to die upon a kiss. [Dies. The time, the place, the torture, — 0 enforce it!
- Cas. This did I fear, but thought he had no weapon, Myself will straight aboard; and, to the state,
For he was great of heart. This heavy act with heavy heart relate. [Exeum.
- THE END.
*
-
LEIPSIC,

PRINTED BY B. G. TEUBNER.

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The TEMPEST
Two GENTLEMEN of VERoNA
MERRY WIves of WINDsor
Twelfth NIGHT; or, WHAT You
WILL
MEASURE FoR MEASURE
Much Ado About NoTHING
MIDsummer-NIGHT’s DREAM
Love's LABour's Lost
MERCHANT of VENICE
As You LIKE IT
ALL's WELL THAT ENDs WELL
TAMING of THE SHREw .
WINTER’s TALE
CoMEDY of ERRoRs
MACBETH
KING John
KING RIchard II. .
KING HENRY IV. PART I.

-
Page.
1 || KING IIENRY IV. PART II.
18 || KING HENRY W. - -
5 || KING | HENRY WI. PART I.
KING HENRY WI. PART II.
55 || KING HENRY WI. PART III.
74 || KING RIchard III.
95 || KING HENRY VIII.
115 | TRo11.Us AND CREssidA
132 || TIMon of ATHENs
153 || CoRioLANUs .
173 || JULIUS CAEsAR .
193 l ANToNY AND CLEOPATRA
216 | CYMBELINE
235 | TITUs ANDRONICUs
260 | PERICLEs, PRINCE of TYRE.
274 || KING LEAR
292 Romeo AND JULIET
312 HAMLET, PRINCE of DENMARK
334 || OTHELLo, MooR of WENicE.

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Des. What is your pleasure?

oth. Let me see your eyes? Look in my face!

Des. What horrible fancy's this?

Oth. Some of your function, mistress; (To Emilia.

Leave procreants alone, and shut the door; Cough, or cry-hem, if any body come: Your mystery, your mystery; -nay, dispatch? [Exit Emilia. Des. Upon my knees, what doth your speech import? I understand a fury in your words, But not the words. Oth. Why, what art thou? Des: Your wife, my lord: your true And loyal wife. Oth. Come, swear it, damn thyself; Lest, being like one of heaven, the devils themselves Should fear to seize thee: therefore be doubledamn'd, Swear—thou are homest! Des. Heaven doth truly know it. Oth. Heaven truly knows, that thou art false ashell. Des. To whom, my lord? with whom? How am I false? Oth. O Desdemona 1–away! away! away! Des. Alas, the heavy day! — Why do you weep? Am I the occasion of these tears, my lord? If, haply, you my father do suspect, An instrument of this your calling back, Lay not your blame on me; if you have lost him, Why, I have lost him too. * Had it pleas'd heaven me with affliction; had he rain’d of sores, and shames, on my bare head; in poverty to the very lips; tivity me and my utmost hopes; ound in some part of my soul e - but (alas') to make me he time of scorn moving finger at,

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Be-not to be a strumpet, I am none.
Oth. What, not a whore?
Des. No, as I shall be saved.
Oth. Is it possible?

Pes. O, heaven forgive us!

Oth. I cry you mercy, then;
I took you for that cunning whore of Venice,
That married with othello. – You, mistress,
Re-enter Emilia.
That have the office opposite to St Peter,
And keep the gate of hell. You! you! ay, you!
We have done our course; there's money for your
pains; -
I pray you, turn the key, and keep our counsel. [Exit.
Emil. Alas, what does this gentleman conceive?—
How do you, madam? how do you, my good lady?
Des: 'Faith, half asleep.
Emil. Goodmadam, what's the matter with my lord?
Des. With who?
Emil. Why, with my lord, madam!
Des. Who is thy lord?
Emil. He that is yours, sweet lady! ---
Des. I have none. Do not talk to me, Emilia;
I cannot weep; nor answer I have none, -
But what should go by water. Prythee, to-night,
Lay on my bed my weeding sheets, -remember;-
Aud call thy husband hither! -
Emil. Here is a change, indeed! [Exit.
Des: 'Tis meet I should be us’d so, very meet.
How have I been behav'd, that he might stick
The small'st opinion on my great'st abuse?
Re-enter EMulla, with IAco. - -
Iago. What is your pleasure, madam? How is it
with you?
Des. I cannottell. Those, that do teach young babes,
Do it with gentle means, and easy tasks!
He might have chid me so; for, in good faith,
I am a child to chiding.
Iago. What's the matter, lady?
Emil. Alas, Iago, my lord hath so bewhor'd her,
Thrown such despite and heavy terms upon her,

As true hearts cannot bear.

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Pes. Such, as she says, my jord did say I was.
Emil. He call'd her, whore; a beggar, in his drink,

Could not have laid such terms upon his callet.

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