An Essay on Electricity, Containing a Series of Experiments Introductory to the Study of that Science

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J.B. Becket, 1773 - 159 Seiten
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Seite 149 - A turkey is to be killed for our dinner by the electrical shock and roasted by the electrical jack before a fire kindled by the electrified bottle; when the healths of all the famous electricians in England, Holland, France and Germany are to be drank in electrified bumpers under the discharge of guns from the electrical battery.
Seite 133 - ... through the air of the room and the bedding, when it can go through a continued better conductor, the wall. But where it can be had, a hammock or...
Seite 116 - ... extended, he fell backwards, and lay without any motion, or sign of life for about a minute. Then followed convulsions, but not very violent, in all his limbs ; and after that a convulsive respiration, attended with a small rattling in the throat. In about four minutes from the time that he was struck, he was able to move, though he did not offer to walk till about half an hour after ; in all which time, he kept discharging a great quantity of saliva ; and there was also a great flux of rheum...
Seite 132 - ... or crooked, following the form of the roof or other parts of the building, will receive the lightning at its upper end, attracting it so as to prevent its striking any other part; and, affording it a good conveyance into the earth, will prevent its damaging any part of the building.
Seite 132 - ... staples. It would rather, if any were in the wall, pass out of it into the rod, to get more readily by that conductor into the earth. If the building be very large and extensive, two or more rods may be placed at different parts, for greater security.
Seite 132 - ... pictures or wainfcot ; the fafeft place is in the middle of the room, (fo it be not under a metal luftre fufpended by a chain,) fitting in one chair and laying the feet up in another. It is ftill fafer to bring two or three...
Seite 133 - ... can have in any room whatever, and what indeed may be deemed quite free from danger of any stroke by lightning.
Seite 116 - ... struck, he was able to move, though he did not offer to walk till about half an hour after ; in all which time, he kept discharging a great quantity of saliva ; and there was also a great flux of rheum from his eyes, on which he kept putting his feet ; though in other respects he lay perfectly listless. He never opened his eyes all the evening in which he was struck, and the next morning he appeared to be quite blind, though seemingly well in every other respect. Having dispatched the dog, by...
Seite 116 - The moment he was struck, which was on the head (but, not having a very good light, I could not tell exactly where) all his limbs were extended, he fell backwards, and lay without any motion, or sign of life for about a minute.
Seite 113 - entirely ignorant of the electric fluid', but looked forward to the day when 'an electric machine might be contrived to go by wind or water, and a convenient room might be annexed to it in which a floor might be raised on electrics, and a person might sit down, read, sleep or even walk about during the electrification'.

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