Adventures of Robinson Crusoe

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S.W. Partridge & Company, 1873 - 336 Seiten
 

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Seite 1 - I WAS born in the year 1632, in the city of York, of a good family, though not of that country, my father being a foreigner of Bremen, who settled first at Hull.
Seite 96 - I could hear nothing, nor see anything; I went up to a rising ground to look farther; I went up the shore and down the shore, but it was all one; I could see no other impression but that one.
Seite 98 - Call upon me in the day of trouble, and I will deliver thee, and thou shalt glorify me.
Seite 119 - ... many antic gestures to show it. At last he lays his head flat upon the ground, close to my foot, and sets my other foot upon his head, as he had done before ; and after this, made all the signs to me of subjection, servitude, and submission imaginable, to let me know how he would serve me so long as he lived.
Seite 98 - When I came to my castle, for so I think I called it ever after this, I fled into it like one pursued. Whether I went over by the ladder, as first contrived, or went in at the hole in the rock, which I...
Seite 118 - He was a comely, handsome fellow, perfectly well made, with straight strong limbs, not too large, tall, and well-shaped, and, as I reckon, about twenty-six years of age. He had a very good countenance, not a fierce and surly aspect, but seemed to have something very manly in his face; and yet he had all the sweetness and softness of an European in his countenance too, especially when he smiled.
Seite 35 - My raft was now strong enough to bear any reasonable weight ; my next care was what to load it with, and how to preserve what I laid upon it from the surf of the sea ; but I was not long considering this.
Seite 118 - The poor savage who fled, but had stopped, though he saw both his enemies fallen and killed, as he thought, yet was so...
Seite 179 - ... and the men .of labour spent their strength in daily strugglings for bread to maintain the vital strength they laboured with; so living in a daily circulation of sorrow, living but to work, and working but to live, as if daily bread were the only end of a wearisome life, and a wearisome life the only occasion of daily bread.
Seite 119 - Master, and then let him know that was to be my name; I likewise taught him to say Yes and No, and to know the meaning of them.

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