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thing strange, and wondered to see such multitudes of people in the streets ; but what I suffer most from is, the remembrance of yours and my father's kindness; but I begin to be more reconciled to my state, as I know you were not able to support me at home. I return you a thousand thanks for the kind advices you were so good to give me at parting, and I shall endeavour to practice them as long as I live; let me hear from you as often as you have an opportunity; so with my duty to you and my father, and kind love to all friends,

I remain ever,

your most dutiful daughter.

LETTER V.

The Mother's Answer.

you have

have got

DEAR CHILD,

I am glad to hear that into so worthy a family. You know that we never should have parted from you had it not been for your good. If you continue virtuous and obliging, all the family will love and esteem you. Keep yourself employed as much as you can,

and be always ready to assist your fellow servants. Never speak, ill of any body, but when you hear a bad story, try to soften it as much as you can ; do not repeat it over again, but let it slip out of your

mind as soon as possible. I am in great hopes that all the family are kind to you, from the good character I have heard of them. If you have any time to spare from your business I hope you will spend some part of it in reading your Bible, and the Whole Duty of man. I pray for you

daily, and there is nothing 1 desire more than my dear child's happiness.' Remember, that the more faithful you are in the discharge of your duty as a servant, the better you will prosper if you live to have a family of

Your father de sires his blessing, and your brothers and sisters their kind love to you. Heaven bless you, my dear child! and continue you to be a comfort to us all, and particularly to,

Your affectionate mother.

your own.

LETTERS ON BUSINESS.

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LETTER VI.
To a Correspondent, requesting the pay

ment of a sum of money.

SIR,

ALTHOUGH the balance of the account between us has been standing in my favour, yet I would not have applied to you at. pres ent, had not a very unexpected demand been made upon me for a very considerable sum, which, without your assistance, is not in my power to answer. When I have an opportunity of seeing you, I shall inform you of the nature of this demand, and the necessity of my discharging it. I hope you will excuse me this freedom which nothing but a regard to my credit and family could oblige me to take. If it does not suit you to remit the whole, part will be thankfully received by

Your humble geryant.

LETTER VII.

Answer.

SIR,

I HAVE just received yours, am sorry to hear your affliction. That the account between us was not sooner settled, was owing to the failure of two principal creditors. I have just received a remittance from New Brunswick, and am greatly pleased that it is in my power to answer the whole of your demand. The balance between us is two thousand dollars, for which I have sent inclosed an order on Mr. Cash, the banker. I hope you will surmount this and every other difficulty, and am,

Your sincere well wisher:

LETTER VIII. Frome

money, to a Gentleman of reputed benevolence.

ty to set up in business, but destitute of

HONOURED SIR,

WHEN you look at the subscription, you will remember my serving you with goods, when I was apprentice to Mr. Cars

e

ter, grocer, in New York.

in New-York. I have been a little above two years out of my time, which was spent in Mr. Carter's service, and the greatest part of my wages have been given to support an aged "mother, , confined to her sick bed. Mr. Carter died about ten days ago ; and having no family, his executors who are almost strangers to me, are going to let the store. My worthy master has left me one thousand dollars in his will, but that is no way sufficient to purchase the stock in trade; nor will they give any longer credit than twelve months. Being well acquainted with the trade, as also the customers, and having such a fair prospect of settling in business, I have presumed to lay it be

I have often heard of your willingness to serve those under difficulties; especially young people, beginning the world. If

you approve of this, and will advance so much on my bond, payable in a limited time, it shall be as safe as if in the hands of banker. I shall be as frugal and industrious as possible, and the whole of my time shall be employed in the closest attendance to the duties of my station, and shall acknowledge your kindness with gratitude, as long as I live in this

fore you.

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your banker.

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