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Gentleman's Magazine :

AND

Historical Chronicle.

From JULY to DECEMBER, 1814.

VOLUME LXXXIV.

(BEING THE SEVENTH OF A NEW SERIES.)

PART THE SECOND.

PRODESSE ET DELECTARE.

E PLURIBUS UNUM,

By SYLVANUS URBAN, Gent.

LONDON: Printed by NICHOLS, SON, and BENTLEY,

at Cicero's Head, Red Lion Passage, Fleet Street;
where LETTERS are particularly requested to be sent, Post-PAID.
And sold by J. HARRIS (Successor to Mrs. NEWBERY),
at the Corner of St. Paul's Church Yard, Ludgate Street;

and by Perthes and Besser, Hamburgh. 1814.

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ANNIVERSARY ODE ON THE BIRTH OF CHRIST, for 1814,

By JOHN STOYLE, Lieutenant R. N.

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2

1.

III. AT length, to hail the natal morn

No more the warlike brazen note, Of Him whose blessings still increase, Terrific on the ambient air, Glad tidings are in mercy borne

Shalt, charg'd with deathful tidings, O’er Europe's piaios in notes of

foat, Peace:

And long embattled lines prepare. And may the votive lay, the joyous strain, Still may the Sovereign Power, that rules United breathe the theme of endless

each wave, praise.

Say to surrounding Nations “ Peace Reign, reign, incarnate Lord! for ever

be still :" reign;

Long may his power, omnipotent to May Earth unite with Heaven in grateful

save, lays.

Subdue vast empires to his sovereign Immortal souls still deign to bless

will. With wisdom's lore profound;

A Saviour comes ! prepare the way! Thy ways are ways of pleasantness,

His voice, ye Nations, hear! Thy paths with peace abound.

Descending from eternal day, He, at whose voice the billows cease to Behold your Lord appear! roll,

He comes in Love Divine, from highest
Subservient to his will o'er yop vast deep,

Heaven:
Can harmonize the passions of the soul; His well-known voice Creation beard,
And all her powers in heavenly order

afar,
keep.

Where light arose and dark confusion His awful voice is heard above the storm,

driven Nor shall its wasting rage again his Retired; while beauty beam'd from star works deform.

to star,

For lasting reign through yon ethereal
II.

void,
O blissful day when Peace from Hea- Till years shall cease to roll, and time

shall be destroy'd. Descending bless'd the world below, From Love's exhaustless fountain given,

lu streams that still in mercy Aow ! Thrice happy! may the World beloxges May rescued Nations still improve the Enshrin'd in Wisdom's sacred ligbt). sound

In gratitude for ever glow, That Europe hails with one according And Discord sink in antient night. voice,

May Man still dwell on Zion's heavenly Since Man's eternal Foe receives the

strain, wound,

Where praises most divinely rais'd beau "And in the Saviour's mightier name re

long joice.

For Him, whose infinitely glorious reign Eternal praises to his name

Shall be the burthen of his sacred song. Through ages hence-be pour'd,

The boundless skies above may fade, Afar, by everlasting Fame,

The countless spheres retire ! And evermore ador'd.

And Desolation cast its shade May He, who left his throne in realms of Behiud a world on fire! light,

But lo! the soul of man, to his God and The standard of ETERNAL 'TRUTH uprear,

King, That Peace confirm'd, pre-eminently To him whose essence is ETERNAL LOVE," bright,

Triumphant o'er the general wreck shall : May in the future rolls of Time appear,

sing, Tilf his imperial banner greet the skies,

And in her exaltation still improve : And the last trumpet sounds, Ye dead Eternal ages scarce her worth shall know, 2.4 awake, and rise!

Through ALL ETERNITY her powers die

vinely gron. Portsea, Dec. 25, 1814.

ven

IV.

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PREFACE

TO THE

SECOND PART OF THE EIGHTY-FOURTH VOLUME.

FOR

tions

OR a long and continued succession of years we have been accus tomed, with solemn resignation to the Great Disposer of Events, confiding in his mercy, and hoping in his justice, to contemplate one object, and almost one only. This has been the disastrous consequence of a Tyrannical Usurpation, which, like the cloud on Mount Carmel, at first no bigger than a man's hand, gradually spread its gloom and horrors over a large part of the civilized world, overturning from their founda

many of the most antient and solid Establishments, and threatening the security of all. _Extensive indeed was the circulation of its destrue tive principles. They were seen and felt far beyond the bounds of Europe; they were discernible even in the remote regions of China, they spread alarm in Siam and Pegu, they were recognized in the heart of Hindostan, and much of their mighty inischief had reached to Persia.

The contagious effects of this Despotism were not only aimed at the moral constitution of things: they blighted every thing they approached; and, from profaning the holy edifices consecrated to the Most High, they descended to the Bowers of the Muses, and, like the plague of Locusts, converted their delightful haunts into the barrenness of the desert, and forbade all approach to their territories.

How changed the scene!-how cheering the future prospect! What demands upon our gratitude as Men, as Citizens, as Friends to every ingenious Art, and every branch of Science! The present scene seems strongly to remind us of the period of the Middle Ages, when, after the barbarous fury of Goths and Vandals had buried Learning and the Arts in the darkest obscurity of night, “ Leo's golden days" arose, and again restored them to light and liberty. Already are the delightful effects visible in Europe. The Scholars of the North and of the South, for a long time compelled either to suppress or restrain their ardour for Science, or, what is worse, forced by a Tyrant's arm to employ their talents on unworthy subjects, for dishonest purposes, once more are actively engaged in the multiplication of learned, useful, and important works. The Muses of France, so long cramped, fettered, and oppressed, are roused from their bed of iron, and, lending their powerful aid to the general cause, have placed at a distance, and concealed from view, in the closed Temple of Janus, that execrable image which alone they were allowed to adore,-the Genius of Military Science.

Our Countrymen, we well know, will lend no reluctant assistance in the promotion of so glorious an object as the improvement and diffusion of Science; we may also add, and the melioration of manners. It is one of the curses of a protracted state of Warfare, that it renders Man ferocious,

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