Liberty and Law: Or, Outlines of a New System for the Organization and Administration of Federative Government

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G. I. Jones, 1880 - 387 Seiten
 

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Seite 266 - Property does become clothed with a public interest when used in a manner to make it of public consequence and affect the community at large. \Vhen, therefore, one devotes his property to a use in which the public has an interest he, in effect, grants to the public an interest in that use, and must submit to be controlled by the public for the common good, to the extent of the interest he has thus created.
Seite 362 - ... and lest thou lift up thine eyes unto heaven, and when thou seest the sun, and the moon, and the stars, even all the host of heaven, shouldest be driven to worship them, and serve them, which the Lord thy God hath divided unto all nations under the whole heaven.
Seite 280 - The subjects of every State ought to contribute towards the support of the government, as nearly as possible in proportion to their respective abilities ; that is, in proportion to the revenue they respectively enjoy under the protection of the State .... In the observation or neglect of this maxim, consists what is called the equality 'or inequality of taxation.
Seite 280 - Every tax ought to be so contrived as both to take out and to keep out of the pockets of the people as little as possible, over and above what it brings into the public treasury of the State.
Seite 49 - Mastering the lawless science of our law, That codeless myriad of precedent, That wilderness of single instances, Thro' which a few, by wit or fortune led, May beat a pathway out to wealth and fame.
Seite 76 - But if the moral pestilence that rises with them, and in the eternal laws of outraged nature, is inseparable from them, could be made discernible too, how terrible the revelation! Then should we see depravity, impiety, drunkenness, theft, murder, and a long train of nameless sins against the natural affections and repulsions of mankind, overhanging the devoted spots, and creeping on, to blight the innocent and spread contagion among the pure.
Seite 280 - Smith wrote that the subjects of every state ought to contribute towards the support of government as nearly as possible In proportion to their respective abilities: that Is, In proportion to the revenue which they respectively enjoy under the protection of the state.
Seite 266 - This brings us to inquire as to the principles upon which this power of regulation rests, in order that we may determine what is within and what without its operative effect. Looking, then, to the common law, from whence came the right which the Constitution protects, we find that when private property is "affected with a public interest, it ceases to be juris privati only.
Seite 280 - The tax which each individual is bound to pay ought to be certain and not arbitrary. The time of payment, the manner of payment, the quantity to be paid, ought all to be clear and plain to the contributor, and to every other person.
Seite xv - bank paper must be suppressed, and the circulation restored to the Nation, to whom it belongs.

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