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MEMOIRS

OP

PRINCE CHARLES STUART.

CHAPTER XXI.

BATTLE OF CULLODEN-DEFEAT AND DISPERSION OF THE

HIGHLAND ARMY-FLIGHT OP CHARLES.

That this state of things could continue longer than till the return of spring was not to be expected. On the 19th of April, after a few days of thaw, followed by a high wind that had made the roads tolerably dry again, the Duke of Cumberland broke up from Aberdeen with eight thousand infantry and nine hundred horse, abundantly provided with every thing, and supported by a naval force, which accompanied his course along the coast, ready to supply him with whatever his army stood in need of. On the 21st, the Duke arrived at Banff, where two Highlanders were

VOL. II.

OSS

hanged as spies, in consequence of their having been observed to count the numbers of the army, and to assist their memories by notching a stick. Two days afterwards, the Duke crossed the Spey. Lord John Drummond had been sent with a strong detachment to dispute the passage of the river, whose deep and rapid torrent had often in Scottish story set bounds to the progress of an assailant. For this purpose some batteries had even been erected on the left bank, but Lord John soon satisfied himself that his light pieces would soon be silenced by the heavy artillery of the enemy, and, accordingly, fell back upon Inverness; while the Duke's army forded the Spey in three divisions, and on the 25th of April entered Nairn, where they were separated by a distance of only ten miles from the Jacobite head-quarters at Inverness. Beyond Nairn some skirmishing took place between the rear of the one army and the van of the other, but this was quickly put an end to by the arrival of Charles at the head of his guards, when the Duke's van immediately fell back upon the main body of his army.

Charles exulted in the prospect of an impending battle, and even the chiefs forgot their mutual

erness.

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