Egypt: Native Rulers and Foreign Interference

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W. Ridgway, 1882 - 322 Seiten
 

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Seite 179 - Abdin, and demanded from the Khedive the dismissal of the Minister of War and redress for their grievances, which consisted principally in the promotion of Turkish and Circassian officers. " The Khedive informed the French and English Agents that he had no means of resistance, and no regiment on which he could count ; and news having arrived that another regiment was marching in from Tourah, His Highness dismissed the Minister of War and appointed Mahmoud Pasha Sami in his stead. Tranquillity was...
Seite 35 - Palmerston, as it will have been seen by some of his preceding letters, judged this desirable for the peace of Europe ; whether his view was or was not a right one may be canvassed hereafter. It suffices here to say that it existed. The great obstacle at the moment was internal division, for Mehemet...
Seite 133 - Generous and openhanded, his mania was giving ; — his great fault never to think of the liabilities incurred. In accepting the financial aid of the Continent, he did not discern the political consequences, nor the jealous intrigues which were to turn his monetary difficulties into a source of international meddling and encroachment. " Blindfolded, Ismail allowed himself to fall into the hands of money-lenders ; from high to low, all Continental usurers threw themselves upon Egypt as an easy prey....
Seite 275 - It was a policy natural for France if France was the enemy of England ; but it was a policy impossible for France if there was to be a sincere alliance and friendship between the two countries, because the mistress of India cannot permit France to be mistress directly or indirectly of the road to her Indian dominions.
Seite xi - We do not want Egypt,' he said, 'or wish it for ourselves, any more than any rational man with an estate in the north of England and a residence in the south would have wished to possess the inns on the north road. All he could want would have been that the inns should be well-kept, always accessible, and furnishing him, when he came, with mutton-chops and post-horses.
Seite 235 - ... repeatedly warned Lord Granville of the dangerous policy Her Majesty's Ministers were pursuing in Egypt, but his warnings and advice were both unheeded. Writing to Lord Granville on the 19th of May, 1882 — just three weeks before the first massacre — he thus truly describes the situation : — ' In order to arrive at a settlement, the first step must necessarily be the resignation of the Ministry now in power, and the surrender of the military leaders...
Seite 239 - Ulema and others, waited on the Khedive, and asked him to reinstate Arabi as Minister of War. He refused ; but they besought him, saying that, though he might be ready to sacrifice his own life, he ought not to sacrifice theirs, and that Arabi had threatened them all with death if they did not obtain his consent. The Colonel of the Khedive's Guard stated that the guard of the Palace had been doubled, that orders had been given to them to prevent his leaving the Palace for his usual drive, and to...
Seite 122 - Assembly of Delegates, one of the inchoate reforms projected by Mehemet Ali, but which had not met since his death. This germ of an Egyptian Parliament consists of village sheikhs and other provincial notables, elected by the communes, and assembles once a year to receive from the Privy Council a report on the administration during the twelvemonth.
Seite 123 - I fell in with some Egyptians on my way, and tried the European style of talk. " Now you will help to govern the country : what a fine thing for you,
Seite 117 - ... hareem, and to remember that he ought to have been the head of a household of his own, however humble : and in this contrast of what is with what ought to have been, slavery is seen to be fully as detestable here as anywhere else. These two hellish practices, slavery and polygamy, which, as practices, can clearly never be separated, are here avowedly connected; and in that connexion, are exalted into a double institution, whose working is such as to make one almost wish that the Nile would rise...

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