Poems on Various Subjects: Ornamented with Plates, and Illustrated with Notes, Original Letters and Curious Incidental Anecdotes. In the Course of which the Pretended Miracles of Vespasian are Examined and Detected. By Samuel Whyte

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Robert Marchbank, and sold by Byrne, Moore, Rice, Milliken, Mercier, &c, and by the editor, 1795 - 545 Seiten
 

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Seite xx - Three poets, in three distant ages born, Greece, Italy, and England did adorn. The first in loftiness of thought surpassed, The next in majesty, in both the last. The force of Nature could no farther go ; To make a third she joined the former two.
Seite 356 - Then die, that she The common fate of all things rare May read in thee ; How small a part of time they share, That are so wondrous sweet and fair.
Seite 338 - Nay, take my life and all; pardon not that: You take my house, when you do take the prop That doth sustain my house; you take my life, When you do take the means whereby I live.
Seite 357 - In vain for him the officious wife prepares The fire fair-blazing, and the vestment warm ; In vain his little children, peeping out Into the mingling storm, demand their sire, With tears of artless innocence.
Seite 6 - One of the best attested miracles in all profane history, is that which Tacitus reports of Vespasian, who cured a blind man in Alexandria, by means of his spittle, and a lame man by the mere touch of his foot; in obedience to a vision of the god Serapis, who had enjoined them to have recourse to the Emperor, for these miraculous cures.
Seite 3 - The Accusing Spirit, which flew up to Heaven's chancery with the oath, blushed as he gave it in ; and the Recording Angel, as he wrote it down, dropped a tear upon the word, and blotted it out for ever.
Seite 5 - From which ingredients first the dext'rous boy Pick'd the demure, the awkward, and the coy. The Graces from the court did next provide Breeding, and wit, and air, and decent pride: These Venus cleans'd from ev'ry spurious grain Of nice coquet, affected, pert, and vain. Jove mix'd up all, and the best clay employ'd; Then call'd the happy composition FLOYD.
Seite 226 - To John I ow'd great obligation ; But John unhappily thought fit To publish it to all the nation : Sure John and I are more than quit.

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