The True Benjamin Franklin

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J.B. Lippincott, 1898 - 369 Seiten
Decrying the habit of American biographers to mythologize their subjects, Sydney George Fisher sets out to write a book about the True Benjamin Franklin. Of Franklin, he says that the human in him was so interlaced with the divine that the one dragged the other into light. Fisher s book is a unique biography of Benjamin Franklin, written by an opinionated man who grew up directly in the wake of Franklin s influence on American culture.--
 

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Seite 147 - Things, for they may all be blasted without the Blessing of Heaven; and therefore ask that Blessing humbly, and be not uncharitable to those that at present seem to want it, but comfort and help them. Remember Job suffered, and was afterwards prosperous. And now to conclude, Experience keeps a dear School, but Fools will learn in no other...
Seite 360 - often and often in the course of the session, and the vicissitudes of my hopes and fears as to its issue, looked at that sun behind the president without being able to tell whether it was rising or setting; but now, at length, I have the happiness to know that it is a rising, and not a setting sun.
Seite 149 - THE BODY of BENJAMIN FRANKLIN, Printer, (like the cover of an old book, its contents torn out, and stript of its lettering and gilding) lies here food for worms ; yet the work itself shall not be lost, for it will (as he believed) appear once more in a new and more beautiful edition, corrected and amended by THE AUTHOR.
Seite 42 - I had never before seen any of them. I bought it, read it over and over, and was much delighted with it. I thought the writing excellent and wished if possible to imitate it.
Seite 147 - Industry all easy, as Poor Richard says; and He that riseth late must trot all Day, and shall scarce overtake his Business at Night; while Laziness travels so slowly, that Poverty soon overtakes him...
Seite 360 - On the whole, sir, I cannot help expressing a wish that every member of the Convention who may still have objections to it would, with me, on this occasion doubt a little of his own infallibility, and, to make manifest our unanimity, put his name to this instrument.
Seite 90 - I happened soon after to attend one of his sermons, in the course of which, I perceived he intended to finish with a collection, and I silently resolved he should get nothing from me: I had in my pocket a handful of copper money, three or four silver dollars, and five pistoles in gold; as he proceeded I began to soften, and concluded to give the copper.
Seite 147 - Time must be (as Poor RICHARD says) the greatest prodigality ; since, as he elsewhere tells us, Lost time is never found again; and what we call Time enough ! always proves little enough. Let us then up and be doing, and doing to the purpose : so, by diligence, shall we do more with less perplexity. Sloth makes all things difficult, but Industry all things easy...
Seite 134 - For instance, my breakfast was a long time bread and milk (no tea), and I ate it out of a twopenny earthen porringer with a pewter spoon.
Seite 152 - When Abraham sat at his tent door, according to his custom, waiting to entertain strangers, he espied an old man, stooping and leaning on his staff, weary with age and travel, coming towards him, who was an hundred years of age.

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