Letters to and from the Late Samuel Johnson, LL.D.: To which are Added Some Poems Never Before Printed, Band 1

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A. Strahan, 1788 - 397 Seiten
 

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Seite 134 - I can now look back upon three-score and four years, in which little has been done, and little has been enjoyed ; a life diversified by misery, spent part in the sluggishness of penury, and part under the violence of pain, in gloomy discontent or importunate distress. But perhaps I am better than I should have been if I had been less afflicted. With this I will try to be content.
Seite 131 - I sat down to take notes on a green bank, with a small stream running at my feet, in the midst of savage solitude, with mountains before me, and on either hand covered with heath. I looked around me, and wondered that I was not more affected, but the mind is not at all times equally ready to be put in motion...
Seite 144 - The return of my birth-day, if I remember it, fills me with thoughts which it seems to be the general care of humanity to escape.
Seite 167 - Skie, we left it, as we thought, with a fair wind ; but a violent gust, which Bos. had a great mind to call a tempest, forced us into Col, an obscure island ; on which nulla campis Arbor aestiva recreatur aura.
Seite 277 - Poor Baretti ! do not quarrel with him ; to neglect him a little will be sufficient. He means only to be frank, and manly, and independent, and perhaps, as you say, a little wise. To be frank, he thinks, is to be cynical ; and to be independent is to be rude. Forgive him, dearest lady, the rather, because of his misbehaviour I am afraid he learned part of me.
Seite 4 - THOUGH I have been away so much longer than I purposed or expected, I have found nothing that withdraws my affections from the friends whom I left behind, or which makes me less desirous of reposing at that place which your kindness and Mr Thrale's allows me to call my home.
Seite 178 - PERMEO terras ubi nuda rupes Saxeas miscet nebulis ruinas, Torva ubi rident steriles coloni Rura labores. Pervagor gentes hominum ferorum, Vita ubi nullo decorata cultu Squallet informis, tugurique fumis Fceda latescit.
Seite 362 - As you have now little to do, I suppose you are pretty diligent at the Thraliana ; and a very curious collection posterity will find it. Do not remit the practice of writing down occurrences as they arise, of whatever kind, and be very punctual in annexing the dates. Chronology you know is the eye of history; and every man's life is of importance to himself!
Seite 266 - If I had money enough, what would I do? Perhaps, if you and master did not hold me, I might go to Cairo, and down the Red Sea to Bengal, and take a ramble in India. Would this be better than building and planting ? It would surely give more variety to the eye, and more amplitude to the mind. Half fourteen thousand would send me out to see other forms of existence, and bring me back to describe them.
Seite 96 - I see you smile at my wrong-headed kindness, and reflecting on the charms of your bride, cry out in a rapture, that you are happy enough without my rules. I know you are; but after one of the forty years which I hope you...

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