The Second Reader, Or Juvenile Companion

Cover

Im Buch

Was andere dazu sagen - Rezension schreiben

Es wurden keine Rezensionen gefunden.

Ausgewählte Seiten

Inhalt

Xerxes crosses the Hellespont
25
Vanity of Human Pursuits
26
The First Lesson of Cyrus
27
Pyrrhus and Fabricius
28
So is Life
30
Contentment
32
Noble behavior of Scipio
33
The Happy Choice
35
Socrates and Lamprocles
36
The Happy End
37
Cincinnatus
38
Christian Martyrs
39
The Pleasures of Retirement
40
Anglo Saxon Courts
41
The Trumpet
42
Lewis XII of France
43
King Richard and the Minstrel 43
43
The Graves of a Household
44
Mourat Bey
45
The Human Paradox
46
Charles XII and his Secretary
47
The Sound of the Sea
48
The Dutiful Son or Frederick the Great and his Hussar 33 Frederick and the Hussar or The faithful and
49
Fall of the Leaf
50
Courage and Generosity
51
affectionate Servant
52
The Reformed Robber
53
The Cuckoo
54
Love is Eternal
55
Magnanimous Conduct
56
Smiles and Tears
57
Boerhaave
58
Human Frailty
59
Empress Catharine
60
The Guardian of Youth
61
The Parguinotes
62
The just Judge
63
The lapse of Time
64
Rural Charms
65
Inquisition in Spain
66
The unclouded
67
Power of Conscience
68
Shepherd and Philosopher
69
Pizarro and the Inca of Peru
70
Ode on Solitude
71
North American Indians
72
Picture of Life
73
Shenandoah the Oneida Chief
74
Early Spring
75
The converted Atheist
76
The Hour of Death
77
Dr Beattie and his
78
The Evergreens
79
Robert Bruce
80
The Tempest Stilled
81
Severity of Discipline
82
The Temple
83
The Humane Indian
84
Running for Life
85
Tenderness of Heart
86
Columbus in Jamaica
87
Spirit of
88
Settlement of Virginia
89
The Happy
90
Matrimonial Auction
91
Man and Woman
92
Filial Piety
93
The rising Moon
94

Andere Ausgaben - Alle anzeigen

Häufige Begriffe und Wortgruppen

Beliebte Passagen

Seite 100 - The dew shall weep thy fall to-night, — For thou must die. Sweet Rose, whose hue, angry and brave, Bids the rash gazer wipe his eye, Thy root is ever in its grave, — And thou must die.
Seite 12 - And what is friendship but a name, A charm that lulls to sleep ; A shade that follows wealth or fame, But leaves the wretch to weep...
Seite 44 - How poor, how rich, how abject, how august, How complicate, how wonderful, is man! How passing wonder He who made him such, Who centred in our make such strange extremes! From different natures marvellously mixed, Connection exquisite of distant worlds! Distinguished link in being's endless chain! Midway from nothing to the Deity!
Seite 86 - We have had some experience of it ; several of our young people were formerly brought up at the colleges of the northern provinces; they were instructed in all your sciences ; but, when they came back to us, they were bad runners, ignorant of every means of living in the woods, unable to bear either cold or hunger, knew neither how to build a cabin, take a deer, nor kill an enemy, spoke our language imperfectly, were therefore neither fit for hunters, warriors, nor counsellors ; they were totally...
Seite 30 - HAPPY the man, whose wish and care A few paternal acres bound, Content to breathe his native air In his own ground. Whose herds with milk, whose fields with bread, Whose flocks supply him with attire, Whose trees in summer yield him shade, In winter fire.
Seite 24 - Content I live, this is my stay; I seek no more than may suffice; I press to bear no haughty sway; Look, what I lack my mind supplies. Lo, thus I triumph like a king, Content with that my mind doth bring.
Seite 43 - They sin who tell us Love can die. With life all other passions fly, All others are but vanity ; In Heaven ambition cannot dwell, Nor avarice in the vaults of hell : Earthly these passions of the earth, They perish where they have their birth; But Love is indestructible : Its holy flame for ever burneth, From Heaven it came, to Heaven returneth.
Seite 24 - Some have too much, yet still do crave; I little have, and seek no more. They are but poor, though much they have, And I am rich with little store: They poor, I rich; they beg, I give; They lack, I leave; they pine, I live.
Seite 22 - Like to the falling of a star; Or as the flights of eagles are; Or like the fresh spring's gaudy hue; Or silver drops of morning dew; Or like a wind that chafes the flood; Or bubbles which on water stood; Even such is man, whose borrowed light Is straight called in, and paid to night. The wind blows out; the bubble dies; The spring entombed in autumn lies; The dew dries up; the star is shot; The flight is past; and man forgot.
Seite 10 - To BLOSSOMS FAIR pledges of a fruitful tree, Why do ye fall so fast? Your date is not so past, But you may stay yet here awhile To blush and gently smile, And go at last. What, were ye born to be An hour or half's delight, And so to bid good-night?

Bibliografische Informationen