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Far have I clambered in my mind
Fear no more the heat o' the sun
Fleet the Tartar's reinless steel
Friends, Romuns, Countrymen, Jend me your ears
From harmony, from heavenly harmony
From you have I been absent in the spring
Fiili fathom tive thy father lies
Full knee-leep lies the winter snow
Full little knowest thou, that hast not tried
Full many a glorious morning have I seen

HENRY MORE . SHAKSPEARE WORDSWORTH SILAKSPEARE DRYDEN SILAKSPEARE SUAKSPEARE. TENNISON SPESSER. SILAKSPEARE

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Get up, get up for shame, the blooming morn
Give me it spirit that on life's rough sea .
Give me my cup
Give me my scallop's shell of quiet
Give place, ye ladies, and beyone.
Gol moves in a mysterious way.
Goul of science and of light
Goe, lupy rose, and interwove
Golililoch sat on the grass
Go, lovely rose
Go, soil, the body's guest
Grandmother's mother; her age I guess
Great Gol, greater than grentest
Great Ocean! strongest of Creation's sons
Guia Lord Graham is to Carlisle gane

HERRICK .
G. CHAPMAN
BEN JONSON
Sir W. Raleigu.
HEYWOOD
COWER
CHALCER.
HENRICK
JEAN INGELOW
WALLER
SIR W. RALEIGH
O. W. HOLMES
YOUNG
POLLOK
SCOTT

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Hul to the chief who in triumph advances
Happy, happier far than thon
Happy those early days when I
Hark, hark! the Park at heaven's gate sings
Hark, how I'll bribe yon
Hathi this world without me wrought?'

Have you heard of the wonderful one-lioss-shay?
.llearken in your ear.
He clasps the eray witli hooked hands
He is gone -- iselust
He is gone on the moquitains.
He lives the earth, und says enougla
llence, all your vain lelight-!
llence, Joathe melancholy!
llence, vain delnding jous!
Here is the place; riglie over the lill
Here let us live, and spend a way our lives
Here might I panse and bene in reverence
ller eyes the glow-worm len thee
ller fingers shame the ivory keys
Her finger was so small, the ring
Iler loitse is all of echo made
He's il rare min
He's gane! he's gane! he's frae us tori
He that loves a rosy cheek
He works in rings, in magic rings of clince
Hope smile when your pativity wils cast
How chunged is here each place mau makes or tills!
How fresli, O Lord, how sweet and clean!
How liappy is he born and taught
How many a time have I
How many thousand of my poorest subjects
How near to gooul is what is fair!
Blow oft when thou my music, music play'st
llow pleasant were the songs of Toobonai!
How sellom, friends, a goal great man inherits
How sleep the brave wlio sink to jest
Hlow soon bath time, the subtle thief of youth
How sweet the moonlight sleeps upon the bank!
How they go by, those strange and dreamlike men!
How vainly men themselves amaze!
How young and freslı am I to-night!

SCOTT MRS. IEMANS VALGILAX SILAKSPEARE SILAKSLEARE. F. II. IIEDGE 0. W. HOLMES LOWELL TENNYSON COLERIDGE (Trans.) SCOTT A NONTMOUS. BEAUMONT AND FLETCHER MILTON MILTON WUTTIER CHASSING WORDSWORTH 11 CRRICK WUTTIR SIR Jous SECKLING BEN JONSON JEAN INGELOW BURNS T. CAREW J. J.G. WILKINSON WORDSWORTH MATTITEW ARXOLD IL ERBERT Tortos BYROX SUAKSPEARE BEX JONSON SHAKSI'EARE BYRON. COLERIDGE COLLINS MILTON SILAKSPEARE E S. H MARVELL BEN JOXOX

08 415 380

CS 101 320 458 416 503

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I am holy while I stand . 1 called on dreams and visions to disclose I came to a laund of white and green .

HERRICK WORDS WORTH CHAUCER

58 152 97

305

I challenge not the oracle

SIDNEY H. MORSE
I climbed the dark brow of the mighty Helvellyn . SCOTT
If aught of oaten stop, or pastoral song

COLLINS
If I may trust the flattering eye of sleep.

SHAKSPEARE If men De worlds, there is in every one

DOXXE If this great world of joy and pain

WORDSWORTH If thou be one whose heart the holy formis

WORDS WORTH If thou wert by my side, my love

R. HEBER If with light headl erect I sing

THOREAU. I got me ilowers to strew thy way

HERBERT I have done one braver thing.

DOSE I have learned to look on nature

WORDS WORTH I have ships that went to sea.

R. B. COFFIN I have, thon gallant Trojan

SHAKSPEARE I have woven shrouds of wir

CHANNING I hear thy solemn anthem fall

CHASING I know a little garden close

WILLIAM MORRIS I made a footing imahe wall

BYRON I made a posie, while the day ran by

HERBERT. I mind it weel, in early date

BURN I'm sitting alone by the fire

BRET HARTE I must go furnish up

ARTHI'R BOAR Inland, within a hollow vale I stood

WORDSWORTII. In sweet «ireans, softer than unbroken rest

TENNISON In the frosty season, when the sun

WORDSWORTH In the golden reign of Charlemagne the king . TICKERMAN In the lour of my distress

HERRICK. In the summer even

HARRIET PRESCOTT
In this world, the isle of dreams

HERRICK.
In vain the common theme my tongne would shiun 0. W. HOLMES
In what torn ship soever I embark

DONNE
In Xanadlu dilkubla Khm

COLERIDGE In yonler grave a Druid lies

COLLINS I see a dusk and awful ligure rise

BYROX. I see before me the gladiator lie

BYRON I see men's judgments are

SUAKSPEARE I shall lack voice: the needs of Coriolanis.

SHAKSPEARE I sift the show on the mountains below

SHELLEY I sing of brooks, of blossomx, birds, and bowers HERRICK I sprang to the stiit, and Joris and he .

BROWNING Is there for honest poverty

BIRNS Is thy face like thy mother's, my fair chita?

BYRON It don't seem larilly right, Jolu

LOWELL It follows how you are to prove.

BEN JONSON It happen that I came on a day

CHALCER I think not on my father

SILAKSI'EARE It is not to be thought of, that the flood

WORDSWORTH It little profits that an ille king

TESSE SON It's narrow, narrow make your bed

ANONYMOUS It's no in titles or in rank

BURNS It was fifty years ago

LONGFELLOW It was the season, when through all the land .

LONGFELLOW It was the time when lilies blow

TENSYSON It was the winter wild.

MILTON. It was thy fear, or else some transient wind

W. CONGREVE I wandereıl lonely as it cloud

WORDSWORTH 1 watched her face, suspecting gerns

PATMORE I wish I were where lelen lies

SCOTT I would that thou might always be

N. P. Willis. I've taught me other tongues

BYRON. John Anderson, my jo, John

BURNS John Brown in Kansas settled like a steadfast

STEDMAN Just for a handful of silver he left us

BROWNING Just now I've ta'en a tit of rhyme

BURNS Kings, queens, lorils, ladies, knights, and damsels great

SPENSER Khowing the heart of inan is sei to be

DANIEL

SPANISH BAL

LOCKHAKI King Ferdinand alone did stand one day upon the hill

LADS

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Lady (lara Vere De Vere
Lady, there is a hope that all men have

TESTYSON
CHANNING

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Lately, alas! I knew a gentle boy.
Leaning with parted lips, some words she spakė
Less worthy of applause, though more umired
Let me not to the marriage of true minds
Let the bird of loudest lay
Life and thought have gone away
Life, I know not what thou art
Life may be given in many ways
Light-wingeel smoke! learian bird
Like a poet hidden
Like as the waves make towards the pebbled shore
Like to the clear in highest sphere
Lithe and listen, gentlemen
Little I ask, my wants are few
Little wits King Lain
Lochiel, Lochiel beware of the day
** Lu)," quoth he, “ Cast up thine eve”
Look not thon on beauty's charming
Loril, when I quit this earthly stage
Lord, with what care hast thou begirt iis round
Loud is the rale, the voice is 11P
Love is a sickness full of woes
Low-anchoreil cloud
Lo, when the Lord mane North and South
Lo, where she comes along with portly pace
Macbeth is ripe for shaking,
Man, thee belooveth oft 10 have this in mind
MOI Wints but little here below
Men lave lone brave deeds
Merciful leren!
Merry it is in the good greeii wool
Metlionght I heare il voice say, “ Sleep no more

more »
Methinks it is good to be liere
Milton, thou nioulust be living at this hour
Mine eyes have seen the glory
Mive honesty and I begin to square
Most potent, grave, and reverend signiors
Motious and meus, on land and sea at war
Mounfully, sing mournfully.
Mourn, hills and groves of Attica
Much have I travelled in the realms of gold
My clear and only love, I pray
My gentle Puck, come hither
My God, I heard this day
My lieve, I dil deny no prisoners .
My lowl. you told me you would tell the rest
My mind to me a kingilom is.
My mistress eyes are nothing like the sun
My mother, when I learned that thou wast dead
Mysterious night! when our first parent knew
Naked on parents' Kidex, a new-born child.
Nature is made better ly no mean
Nay, you wrong her, my friend
Neely knife-crinder, whither are you going?
Nighi is fair Virtue's immemorial friend
No abbey's gloom, nor dark cathedral stoops
No! is my answer from this cold bleak ridge
No man is lon of any thing
No more, no more, on! never more on me
Northward lie turneth through a little door
No screw, no piecer can.
No splendor neath the sky's proud dome
Not dra was hearil, not a fueral note.
Not mine own feats nor the prophetic soul
Nonghit loves unother like itselt
November rhill blaws Jou wi' angry singh
Now deeper roll the mauklening drums
Now band your tongue
Now is the time forinth
Now is the winter of our discontent.
Now Nature lanesbernantle green
Now overhead it rainbow bursting through

SILAKSPEARE
ANONYMOUS.
J. Q. ADAMS
E. II.
SILAKSPEARE
SCOTT
SILAKSPEARE
H. KNOWLES
WORDSWORTII
MRS. ITOWE
SILAKSPEARE
SHARTEARE
WORDS WORTII.
MRS. HEMANS
WORDSWORTII.
KEATS
MONTROSE
SILASLEARE
HERBERT.
SHAKSPEARE
SILAKSIDARE
BIRD
SIAKSPEARE
('OWER
J. BLANCO WHTË.

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SIR W. JONES (Trans.)
SILAKSIEARL
JULIA C. R. DORR
CAXING
YOUNG
CHANNING
ANONYMOrs.
SILAKSPEARE
BYROS.
KEATS
HERRICK
PATMORE.
WOLFE
SILAKSPEARE
W. BLAKE
BURNS
G. MELLEN
SCOTT
ILERIIK
SILAKSPEARE
BURNS
BRON

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Now ponder well. rou parents dear

ANONYMOUS Now wol I turn uw my tale agen

CHALCER ( Brignall Banks are will and fair

Scott O dark, dark, dark, amid the blaze of noon

Microx O dear, dar Jeanie Morii-on!

MOTHERWELL () (livine star of heaven

BEAUMONT AND FLETCHER () draw me, Father, after thee

JOHN WESLEY O'er the glad waters of the dark blue sea

BYRON (er we morntides the fair spring clay.

W. ALLINGHAM Of a' the airts the wind can blaw

BURNS Of all the rides since the birth of tiine

WHITTIER Of Nelson and the North

CAMPBELL O for my sake do you with fortune chide'

SHAKSPEARE Often triting with a privilege

WORDSWORTII Oft in the stilly night

T. MOORE of truth, of grandeur, beauty, love, and hope

WORDSWORTH Oft when returning will her loaded will

THOMSOS,
O heavens, if you move old men

SILAKSPEARE
O heard ve yon pibrochi sound and in the gale? CAMPBELL
O, go not yet, my love

TESSYSON
Oh. have ye na heard o' the fause sakelde.

SCOTT
Oli, how much more doth beauty beauteous seem SIAKSPEARE
Oh, lovely Mary Domelly, it's you I love the best ALLINGHAM
O how canst thou renounce the boundless store

BEATTIE
O how feeble is man's power .

DOXXE Oli, weel may the boatie row

ASOSI MOI'S. Ol bave passed a miserable niglit

SUAKSPEARE () joy hast thou a face

I. II. O keeper of the sacred key

F. WILSON O listen, listen, ladies gay

SCOTT Old wine to drink

MESSENGER O Lord, in me there lietlinought

SIDNEY. O messenger. art thon the king, or 1?.

HH. O my luve's like a red, red rose.

BURNS Once git a smell o musk into a draw

LOWELL Once more, Cesario

SILAKSIEARE Once we built ow fortress where you see

WE. CHANXING On the mountain peak.

W. E. (HANSING Onever rudely will I Diame'lis faithi

COLERIDGE One day, nigli weary of the irksome way

SPENSER On Linden, when the sun was low

CAMIBELL 0 Proserpina .

SILAKSPEARE Or if the son of proper kini.

CHALCER. Orpheus with his lute maile trees

SILAKSPEARE O Sacred Providence, who from endio end

HERBERT. () than the fairest day thrice fairer night

WILLIAM DRENMOND O that list clay in Lucknow fort

ROBERT LOWELL o that we now had here

SHAKSPEARE ( the days are gone when beauty bright

T. MOORE ( then what noul was his, when, on the tops

WORDSWORTII O then I see Queen Mab hath been with you

SHAKSPEARE (0 lt 11 g less

SHAKSPEARE O thon who in the leavens dost dwell

BURNS O thou that swing'st iipon the waving ear

LOVELACE 0!'tis wondrous much

CHAPMAN Oir boat to the waves go free

W”. E. CHANNING, Our brethren of New England use

BITLER Our bugles sang trnce; for the night cloud had lowered CAMPBELL Our resels now are endled

SILAKSI'EARE Out 11 on it: I have loveel

SIR JOIS Stckling Oit npon time, who will leave no more

BYRON () waly, waly, my gay goss-hawk

ANONYMOUS. () waly, waly, up the bank

ANONYMOUS O ye wha are sae guid yoursel

BURNS. O young Lochinvår is come out of the West

SCOTT Passion o' me! cried Sir Richard Tyrone.

ANONYMOUS. Peace to all such

POPE. Pibroch or Donuil phil

SCOTT Pleased we remember our august abodes

LANDOR Praise to God, immortal praise .

MRS. BARBAULD. Queen Bonduca, I do not grieve your fortune

BEAU MONT AXD FLETCHER .

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Rabia, sick upon her bed

J. F. CLARKE (Trans.) Rambling along the marshes

CHANNING Rashly; and praised be raslıness for it

SHAKSPEARE
Reasou thus with life

SHAKSPEARE
Remove you skull from out the scattered heaps. BYRON
Ring out, wild bell-, to the wild sky.

TENNYSON
Rise up, rise up, Vrifa! lay the golden cislion down LOCKHART
Rouud my own pretty rose .

T. II. BAYLY Royal Egypt! Empress

SHAKSPEARE Rudolpli, professor of the healsman's tradė

O, W. HOLMES Ruin seize thee, ruthless king

GRAN
Rumble thy belly full! spit tire! spout rain:

SILAKSPEARE
Rm, slepherus, run where Bethlehem blest appears WILLIAM DRUMMOND
Say to me, whose fortunes shall rise higher

SHAKSPEARE
Say, what is Honor!!

WORDSWORTII Scots, whia bae wi' Wallace vied

BURNS See liow the Orient (ew.

MARIELL. See living vales by living waters blest

(HARLES SPRAGUE See the chariot at hand here of love

BEN JONSON See yonder souls set far within the shade

BEX JONSON Send us your prisoners, or you'll hear of it.

SILAKSI'EARE Shake off your heavy trance

BEAUMOST AND FLETCHER Shall I, wasting in despair:

WITHER. She. of whose poul, if we may say, 'twas goia. DOXXE She's gone to dwell in heaven, my lassie

A (UXXINGHAM She walks in beauty, like the night

BYRON Shine kindly torth, September sun

FB SAXBORX Should auld acquaintance be forgot .

BURNS

FILKE GREVILLE (LORD Silence augmentetlı grief – writing increaseth rage.

BROOKE) Silent. O Moyle, be the roar of thy water

MOORE Since I am coming to that holy room

DONXE Since our country our God --Oh, my sire!

BYROX Since the s

WORDSWORTH Sing, and let your song be new

SIR PHILIP SIDNEY Sing, O Goddess, the wrath, the untamable dander of keitt

PUNCIL. Sitting in my window

BEAUMONT AND

FLETCHER. Sleep is like ideath, and after sleep

ALLINGHAM Sleep sweetly in your humble graves

HENRY TIMROD Slow, now fresa fout, keep time

BEN JOXSOX So am I as the rich, whose lessed key

SUAKSPEARE So every spirit as it is most pure

SPENSER So fallen! so lost! the light withdrawn

WMITIER Soft you; a word or two before you go

SHAKSPEARE
So Saturn, as he walkeil into the milst

KEATS
So, when this feet were planted on the plain TENSYSON
Spring all the graces of the age

BEN JONSON
St. Mark's laushetlabbey heart

Miss PALFREY Star of the flowers and flower of the stars

J. J. G. WILKINSON Stern daughter of the voice of God.

WORDS WORTI Still to be neat, still to be drest

BEN JONSON Sven Vonveel binds his sword to his side

GEORGE BORROW (Trans.) Sweap ho! Sweep ho!

E. S. H. Sweet country lite, to such unknown

HERRICK Sweet day, so cool, so calm, so bright

HERBERT. Sweet echo, sweetest nymph that livist unseen MILTON. Sweetness, truth, and every grace

WALLER Sweet pere, where dost tlou dwell

HERBERT Sweet scented flower, who art wont to bloom

KIRKE WHITE Take along with thee

BEN Jossox Take, O take those lips away

SHAKSPEARE Teach me, my God and King

HERBERT Tell me not, sweet, I am juikind

LOVELACE Tell me where is fancy brech

SHAKSPEARE Tell us, thon clear and heavenly tongue

HERRICK . Thanks for the lessons of this spot

WORDS WORTH That instrument ne'er lieard .

DRAYTOX That regal soul I reverence in whose eyes

D. A. WASS) That which her slender waist contined

E. WALLER The Abbot on the threshold stood

SCOTT The Assyrian came down like the wolf on the fold. BYROS The barge she sat in, like a burnished throne.

SHAKSPEARE

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