Defensor Pacis: Marsilius of Padua

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Columbia University Press, 2001 - 466 Seiten

As Cary J. Nederman writes in the foreword to this new edition, "Marsilius continues to speak to many of the salient issues of modern political life, expressing his doctrines in a language that has resonance and relevance. Whether in addressing the role of citizenship as a buffer between individual and community, or in explicating the foundations of religious toleration, the Defensor pacis (and Marsilius' other writings) affords a distinctive theoretical perspective that rivals that of any of the great thinkers of the Western political tradition."

 

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Nutzerbericht  - thcson - LibraryThing

This is an incredibly acerbic 14th century thesis against the papacy's pretension of world dominion. Copies of this book must have been carefully hidden by generations of diligent dissidents to keep ... Vollständige Rezension lesen

Inhalt

Preface
xvii
Reason Power and the Peoples Will
xxx
Religion and Pol1tics
xlvi
Language and Translation Ixvi
lxvi
List of Frequent References and Abbreviations
xciii
On the First Questions 1n Th1s Book and the Distinction
8
On the Differentiation of the Parts of the State and the Necessity
15
On the Final Cause of a Certa1n Part of the State the Priesthood
21
On the D1fferentiation of the Meanings of Certain Terms
187
On the Status of Supreme Poverty Which Is Usually Called
196
On Some Object1ons to the Conclusions of the Preceding
215
On the Differentiat1on of the Priestly Off1ce According to
233
On the Equal1ty of the Apostles in Each Off1ce or Dignity
241
On the Authority to Appoint the Bishops and Other Ministers
254
On the Origin and First Status of the Christian Church
267
On Certa1n Prel1minary Cons1derations Needed for
274

On the Genera of Polities or Reg1mes the Temperate and
27
On the Distinction of the Meanings of the Term Law and
34
On the Necessity for Making Laws Taken 1n Their Most Proper
37
On the Demonstrable Eff1cient Cause of Human Laws and Also
44
On the Qualities or Dispositions of the Perfect Ruler That
56
Whether It Is More Expedient for the Pol1ty to Appo1nt Each
68
On the Numenal Un1ty of the Supreme Government of
80
On the Correction of the Ruler and for What Cause How
87
DISCOURSE
98
On the Canonic Scriptures the Commands Counsels
113
On the Canon1c Utterances of the Apostles and the Expos1tions
127
On the Authority of the Priestly Keys and What K1nd of Power
140
Summary of the Statements Made in the Preceding Chapter
152
On the Relat1on of Human Acts to Divine Law and to the Judge
163
On the Coercive Judge of Heretics Namely to Whom It Perta1ns
173
On Some S1gns Testimonies and Examples from Both
181
To Whom Belongs or Has Hitherto Belonged the Coerc1ve
287
In What Sense the Roman B1shop and His Church Are
299
On the Modes of Plen1tude of Power and the Manner
313
How in Part1cular the Roman B1shop Has Used His Assumed
321
How in Part1cular the Roman Bishop Has Used His Assumed
331
How the Roman B1shop Has Used This Plenary Power
344
On Some Objections to the Conclus1ons of Chapter XV
364
Repl1es to the Forego1ng Objections
371
Refutation of the Object1ons Wh1ch Were Adduced from
405
Refutation of the Rational Arguments Presented 1n Chapter
415
Review of the Principal A1ms and Conclus1ons of Discourses I
425
On the Title of This Book
431
Afterword
443
Bibl1ography 19502000
459
Urheberrecht

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Über den Autor (2001)

Alan Gewirth is Edward Carson Waller Distinguished Service Professor of Philosophy at the University of Chicago.

Cary J. Nederman is professor of political science at Texas A & M University.

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