The History of Pendennis: His Fortunes and Misfortunes, His Friends and His Greatest Enemy, Band 1

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Bradbury and Evans, 1849 - 596 Seiten
 

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Seite 315 - ALTHOUGH I enter not, Yet round about the spot Ofttimes I hover ; And near the sacred gate, With longing eyes I wait, Expectant of her.
Seite 315 - Kneel, undisturbed, fair Saint ! Pour out your praise or plaint Meekly and duly ; I will not enter there, To sully your pure prayer With thoughts unruly. But suffer me to pace Round the forbidden place, Lingering a minute Like outcast spirits who wait And see through heaven's gate Angels within it.
Seite 308 - There she is — the great engine — she never sleeps. She has her ambassadors in every quarter of the world, her couriers upon every road. Her officers march along with armies, and her envoys walk into statesmen's cabinets. They are ubiquitous. Yonder journal has an agent, at this minute, giving bribes at Madrid, and another inspecting the price of potatoes in Co vent Garden.
Seite 62 - It is best to love wisely, no doubt: but to love foolishly is better than not to be able to love at all. Some of us can't: and are proud of our impotence too. At the end of his speech Pen again kissed the imperial hand with rapture — and I believe it was at this very moment, and while Mrs. Dean and Doctor Portman were engaged in conversation, that young Master Ridley Roset, her son, pulled his mother by the back of her capacious dress and said — "I say, ma!
Seite 204 - ... near female friend. It was devotion — it was passion — it was all sorts of fondness and folly ; it was a profusion of caresses, 'tender epithets and endearments, such as it does not become sober historians with beards to narrate. Do not let us men despise these instincts because we cannot feel them. These women were made for our comfort and delectation, gentlemen, with all the rest of the minor animals.
Seite 292 - The one could afford time to thiiik, and the other never could. The one could have sympathies and do kindnesses ; and the other must needs be always selfish. He could not cultivate a friendship or do a charity, or admire a work of genius, or kindle at the sight of beauty or the sound of a sweet song — he had no time, and no eyes for anything but his law-books. All was dark outside his readinglamp. Love, and Nature, and Art, (which is the expression of our praise and sense of the beautiful world...
Seite 304 - ... dressed, and (must it be owned ?) somewhat dirty, — were here smoking and drinking, and vociferously applauding . the songs; — young university bucks were to be found here, too, with that indescribable genteel simper which is only learned at the knees of Alma Mater ; — and handsome young guardsmen, ami florid bucks from the St. James's Street Clubs ; — nay, senators English and Irish — and even members of the House, of Peers.
Seite 1 - At a quarter past ten the Major invariably made his appearance in the best blacked boots in all London, with a checked morning cravat that never was rumpled until dinner time, a buff waistcoat which bore the crown of his sovereign on the buttons, and linen so spotless that Mr.
Seite 6 - Clavering, a gentleman whose name was Pendennis. There were those alive who remembered having seen his name painted on a board which was surmounted by a gilt pestle and mortar over the door of a very humble little shop in the city of Bath, where Mr.

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