History of the United States of America: From the Discovery of the Continent [to 1789], Band 6

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AMERICA AND GREAT BRITAIN
37
Ministry of Fox and the duke of Portland The king against the ministry
44
Believes American union impossible
51
Holland Spain
57
Debate on revenue
64
Washingtons meditations His appeal to the governor of Virginia
70
Washingtons zeal for establishing a permanent union
76
Coalition of Lord North and Fox
89
Hamilton on the defects of the confederation
99
Madison forced to retire by the rule of rotation
105
Congress declines to lead the way England compels union
114
Holland and John Adams Generosity of France Jeffersons financial plan
120
National measures of Virginia
122
Washington negotiates between Virginia and Maryland lie refuses gifts
128
The objections of Richard Henry Lee
144
The United States agree with France for a perfect reciprocity
152
Of a university No state to trespass on the rights of another state Ml
153
Of the Baptists Of the convention of the Presbyterian church
158
The superintendent defined to be a bishop The Methodists and slavery
164
The court and the legislature of Rhode Island In conflict
169
Inflexibility of Washington
175
The polities of New York corrupted by its customhouse
180
His religion His hatred of war
181
Plan for a federal convention
187
Proposed reform of the confederacy by less than a unanimous vote
188
Congress rests its hopes on the system of April 1788
193
VTROCnA ISTITEa DEPUTIES op the several legislattjbeb of the states
195
Its legislature accepts the invitation from Annapolis
201
litTBS FEDERAL CONTElTTIOJr
207
limited power of the delegates from Delaware
211
The distribution of representation 362
215
Extent of the federal legislative powers
217
The veto power
223
The requirement of an oath
229
How his plan was received
237
Virginia accepts the ordinance with its exclusion of slavery
291
The quorum Qualifications of electors
297
Hy Mason Gorham Mercer Ellsworth Randolph Wilson and Langdon 802
304
THE CONSTITUTION IN DETAIL THE POWERS OF CONGRESS CONTINUED
311
Navy and militia Clause on thcmilitia
318
In South Carolina 91
322
Special provision for tbe admission of Vermont
324
The tenure for seven years with perpetual recllgibility 828
330
Subject referred to a committee of eleven 884
337
Of Hamilton How the votes were to be counted 888
341
State of the president while on trial Judgment in case of impeachment
347
Slavery not recognized as a legal condition
362
CHAPTER L
371
Opponents of the constitution in Virginia 876
377
The Connecticut convention Speeches of Ellsworth and Johnson
394
The convention wavering
401
the constitution in new Hampshire Maryland and south Carolina
409
Conduct of enemies and friends to the federal government
418
The convention organized
419
Failure of the negotiation Washington
424
The American constitution Its forerunners
441
Tripartite division of the power of legislation
447
The Federalist and its authors
453
Debate between Smith and Hamilton Laneing holds out
459
Is divided by parties
461
In Virginia In South Carolina
467
Public prayers in the church Description of Washington
473
The debtor planters Henry on a separate confederacy 480
480
The convention refuses a conditional ratification
486
Bowdoin recommends a federal convention 140
497
Convention of North Carolina 460
500
Judges not removable by address Extent of the judicial power 850
507
Of New Hampshire Rhode Island 169
543
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Seite 294 - We, the people of the States of New Hampshire, Massachusetts, Rhode Island and Providence Plantations, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina and Georgia, do ordain, declare and establish, the following Constitution for the government of ourselves, and our posterity : ARTICLE I.
Seite 220 - Confederation, and moreover to legislate in all cases to which the separate States are incompetent, or in which the harmony of the United States may be interrupted by the exercise of individual legislation ; to negative all laws passed by the several States contravening, in the opinion of the National Legislature, the Articles of Union, or any treaty subsisting under the authority of the Union...
Seite 150 - I have done nothing in the late Contest, but what I thought myself indispensably bound to do, by the Duty which I owed to my People. I will be very frank with you. I was the last to consent to the Separation, but the Separation having been made and having become inevitable, I have always said, as I say now, that I would be the first to meet the Friendship of the United States as an independent Power.
Seite 392 - Under the Articles of Confederation each State retained its sovereignty, freedom and independence, and every power, jurisdiction and right not expressly delegated to the United States.
Seite 376 - That the said report, with the resolutions and letter accompanying the same, be transmitted to the several legislatures, in order to be submitted to a convention of delegates, chosen in each State by the people thereof, in conformity to the resolves of the convention made and provided in that case.
Seite 198 - States, to devise such further provisions as shall appear to them necessary to render the constitution of the federal government adequate to the exigencies of the union...
Seite 323 - I congratulate you, fellow-citizens, on the approach of the period at which you may interpose your authority constitutionally, to withdraw the citizens of the United States from all further participation in those violations of human rights which have been so long continued on the unoffending inhabitants of Africa, and which the morality, the reputation, and the best interests of our country, have long been eager to proscribe.
Seite 373 - Constitution which we now present, is the result of a spirit of amity and of that mutual deference and concession which the peculiarity of our political situation rendered indispensable.
Seite 258 - He thought the rule of representation ought to be so fixed, as to secure to the Atlantic States a prevalence in the national councils.
Seite 107 - And although the general has so frequently given it as his opinion in the most public and explicit manner that, unless the principles of the federal government were properly supported, and the powers of the Union increased, the honor, dignity and justice of the nation would be lost forever...

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