The Repertory of arts and manufactures [afterw.] arts, manufactures and agriculture

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Seite 74 - Now Know Ye, that in compliance with the said proviso, I, the said Adolphe Nicole, do hereby declare that the nature of my said Invention, and the manner in which the same is to be performed, are...
Seite 257 - Now know ye, that in compliance with the said proviso, I, the said William Taylor, do hereby declare that the nature of my said invention, and the manner in which the same is to be performed are particularly described and ascertained in and by the following description thereof, reference being had to the drawing hereunto annexed, and to the figures and letters marked thereon...
Seite 36 - ... such as is in full proof to bear grass ; for here they generate and become destructive, so as often to render it very necessary to plough such land, corn it, and form a new turf ; and though this is so often prohibited, yet it is often consistent with the best principles of husbandry. Here woad is every thing, and corn after it to a certain degree, which experience will determine, according to the kind of land. Those who grow woad in large quantities, have moveable huts for their workpeople ;...
Seite 29 - I had from the same defect purchased such other woad as would do, and informed him where he could get it, he succeeded as usual. His own he disposed of to a drysalter, who sold it again somewhere in the country : and it occasioned such a cause of complaint...
Seite 27 - ... that so often prey upon and destroy it, as well as from inattention to weeding, &c. Crops fail also from being sown on land that is naturally too dry, and in a dry season ; but as the roots take a perpendicular direction and run deep, such land as I have described (with proper attention to my observations) will seldom fail of a crop ; and if the season will admit sowing early enough to have the plants strong before the dry and hot weather comes on, there will be almost a certainty of a great...
Seite 28 - ... they will be destroyed, which I have several times found ; particularly once, when the leaves were two inches long, and in drills very thick and strong, but the ground was dry. When a warm rain fell, in less than two hours I found the ranks on one side attacked by these vermin, and eaten entirely off by a large black grub...
Seite 120 - Thus the Onion, in the south of Europe, acquires a much larger size during the long and warm summers of Spain and Portugal, in a single season, than the colder climate of England ; but under the following mode of culture, which I have long practised, two summers in England produce nearly the effect of one in Spain or Portugal, and the Onion assumes nearly the form and size of those thence imported.
Seite 36 - ... except in carriage. A friend of mine in London took a large quantity of land whereon had been wood just grubbed up. He planted woad on it, and engaged a person from the north to manage it ; and the produce was so abundant as to afford immense profit. I believe he only woaded two years, and then let it. His tenant's produce did not by any means equal his, because the land began to want change. I know not I suppose from 100 to 120 degrees.
Seite 150 - The mixture exposed, consisted of about equal volumes of chlorine and carbonic oxide : the gasses had been previously dried over mercury by the action of fused muriate of lime, and the exhausted glass globe into which they were introduced from a receiver with suitable stopcocks, was carefully dried. After exposure for about a quarter of an hour to bright sunshine, the colour of the chlorine had entirely disappeared ; the stopcock belonging to the globe, being turned in mercury recently boiled, a...
Seite 34 - ... to destroy them ; it is surprising to observe what a degree of heat they will bear. This attention to rendering the surface of the couch even and compact is equally necessary in either process, and to turning the woad exactly as a dung-heap, digging perpendicularly to the bottom. The couching-house should have an even floor of stone or brick, and the walls the same ; and every part of the couch of woad should be beaten with the shovel, and trodden, to render it as compact as possible.

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