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No. 144. Collection of fragments from the comedies of Anti

phanes. 145. Of Anaxandrides. Of Aristophon, with fragments of

that poet. Of Axionicus, Bathon, Chæremon, Clearchus, Criton, Crobylus, Demoxenus, Demetrius, and Diodorus, with fragments of the latter.

Of Dionysius and Ephippus. 146. Fragment of Epicrates. Of Eriphus and Eubulus,

with fragments of the latter. Of Euphron, Heni

ochus, Mnesimachus, and fragments of each. 147. Fragments of the poet Moschion. Of Nicostratus,

Philippus, Phænicides, Sotades, and Straton, with

various fragments of their respective comedies. 118. Fragments of Theophilus, Timocles, and Xenarchus.

Conclusion of the catalogue of writers of the middle comedy. General observation upon these poets, and the author's address to his readers upon this

portion of his work. 149. Account of the new comedy of the Greeks, and of the

several writers of that æra. Anecdotes of Me

nander. 150. Various fragments of Menander translated. 191. Anecdotes of the poet Philemon, and a selection of

Luis fragments. 152. Anecdotes and fragments of Diphilus, of Apollodorus

Gelous, of Philippidas, and of Posidippus. General Premarks upon the conclusion of the subject. The author defends himself against the charge of having attacked the moral doctrines of Socrates.

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WRIGHT, PRINTER, ST. JOHN'S SQUARE.

TIIE

OBSERVER.

NUMBER CIX.

Oudiy
'Ye

ούτως ήδύ ανθρώποις έφυ
Ως το λαλέειν τ' αλλότρια, ,

MENANDEK.

Still to be tattling, still to prate,

No luxury in life so great. The humours and characters of a populous county town at a distance from the capital, furnish matter of much amusement to a curious observer. I have now been some weeks resident in a place of this description, where I have been continually treated with the private lives and little scandalizing anecdotes of almost every person of any note in it. Having passed most of my days in the capital, I could not but remark the striking difference between it and these subordinate capitals in this particular: in London we are in the habit of looking to our own affairs, and caring little about those, with whom we have no dealings : here every body's business seems to be no less his neighbour's concerns than his own: a set of tattling gossips (including all the idlers in the place, male as well as female) seem to have no other employment for their time or tongue, but to run from house to house, and circulate their silly stories up and down. A few of these contemptible impertinents I shall now describe.

Miss Penelope Tabby is an antiquated maiden of at least forty years standing, a great observer of dc. corum, and particularly hurt by the behaviour of

VOL. XL.

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