The (Old) Farmer's Almanack, Ausgaben 69-78

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Jenks, Palmer & Company, 1860
 

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Seite 15 - And what is so rare as a day in June ? Then, if ever, come perfect days; Then Heaven tries the earth if it be in tune, And over it softly her warm ear lays : Whether we look, or whether we listen, We hear life murmur, or see it glisten ; Every clod feels a stir of might. An instinct within it that reaches and towers, And, groping blindly above it for light, Climbs to a soul in grass and flowers...
Seite 41 - Sweet are the thoughts that savour of content ; /The quiet mind is richer than a crown ; Sweet are the nights in careless slumber spent ; The poor estate scorns fortune's angry frown : Such sweet content, such minds, such sleep, such bliss, Beggars enjoy, when princes oft do miss.
Seite 3 - These are the hands whose sturdy labor brings The peasant's food, the golden pomp of kings : This is the page, whose letters shall be seen Changed by the sun to words of living green...
Seite 42 - Never give up! for the wisest is boldest, Knowing that Providence mingles the cup, And of all maxims the best, as the oldest Is the true watchword of "Never give up!" Never give up! though the grapeshot may rattle, Or the full thundercloud over you burst, Stand like a rock, — and the storm or the battle Little shall harm you, though doing their worst; Never give up! if adversity presses, Providence wisely has mingled the cup, And the best counsel, in all your distresses, Is the stout watchword...
Seite 42 - Who, hopeless, lays his dead away, Nor looks to see the breaking day Across the mournful marbles play! Who hath not learned, in hours of faith, The truth to flesh and sense unknown, That Life is ever lord of Death, And Love can never lose its own!
Seite 41 - Ah ! on Thanksgiving Day, when from East and from West, From North and from South come the pilgrim and guest; When the gray-haired New Englander sees round his board The old broken links of affection restored ; When the care-wearied man seeks his mother once more, And the worn matron smiles where the girl smiled before; What moistens the lip and what brightens the eye, What calls back the past, like the rich Pumpkin pie?
Seite lxxxviii - It might have been." Alas for maiden, alas for Judge, For rich repiner and household drudge! God pity them both! and pity us all, Who vainly the dreams of youth recall. For of all sad words of tongue or pen, The saddest are these: "It might have been...
Seite 42 - ... to this, expecting nothing, fearing nothing, but satisfied with thy present activity according to nature, and with heroic truth in every word and sound which thou utterest, thou wilt live happy. And there is no man who is able to prevent this.
Seite 29 - And nights devoid of ease, Still heard in his soul the music Of wonderful melodies. Such songs have power to quiet The restless pulse of care, And come like the benediction That follows after prayer. Then read from the treasured volume The poem of thy choice, And lend to the rhyme of the poet The beauty of thy voice.
Seite 43 - I went by the field of the slothful, and by the vineyard of the man void of understanding; And lo, it was all grown over with thorns, and nettles had covered the face thereof, and the stone wall thereof was broken down.

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