Origins of English History

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B. Quaritch, 1882 - 458 Seiten
 

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Seite 80 - And portance in my travel's history; Wherein of antres vast, and deserts idle, Rough quarries, rocks, and hills whose heads touch heaven, It was my hint to speak, — such was the process; And of the Cannibals that each other eat, The Anthropophagi, and men whose heads Do grow beneath their shoulders.
Seite 10 - Surely the isles shall wait for me, and the ships of Tarshish first, to bring thy sons from far, their silver and their gold with them, unto the name of the Lord thy God, and to the Holy One of Israel, because he hath glorified thee.
Seite 293 - This I give to thee, preserve thou my horses ; this to thee, preserve thou my sheep; and so on.' After that, they use the same ceremony to the noxious animals : ' This I give to thee, O fox ! spare thou my lambs; this to thee, O hooded crow ! this to thee, 0 eagle !' When the ceremony is over, they dine on the caudle...
Seite 422 - Uxores habent deni duodenique inter se communes, et maxime fratres cum fratribus parentesque cum liberis ; sed, si qui sunt ex his nati, eorum habentur liberi, quo primum virgo quaeque deducta est.
Seite 292 - On that, every one takes a cake of oatmeal, upon which are raised nine square knobs, each dedicated to some particular being, the supposed preserver of their flocks and herds, or to some particular animal, the real destroyer of them. Each person then turns his face to the fire, breaks off a knob, and, flinging it over his shoulder, says, " This I give to thee, preserve thou my horses : this to thee, preserve thou my sheep ;
Seite 212 - A bigger kind there is of them, called with us hobgoblins, and Robin Goodfellows, that would, in those superstitious times, grind corn for a mess of milk, cut wood, or do any manner of drudgery work.
Seite 292 - The rites begin with spilling some of the caudle on the ground, by way of libation: on that, every one takes a cake of oatmeal, upon which are raised nine square knobs, each dedicated to some particular being, the supposed preserver of their flocks and herds, or to some particular animal, the real destroyer of them: each person then turns his face to the fire, breaks off a knob, and flinging it over his shoulders, says, This I give to thee, preserve thou my horses; this to thee, preserve thou my...
Seite 155 - Every one who is black-haired, who is a tattler, guileful, tale-telling, noisy, contemptible, every wretched, mean, strolling, unsteady, harsh, and inhospitable person, every slave, every mean thief, every churl, every one who loves not to listen to music and entertainment, the disturbers of every council and every assembly, and the promoters of discord among people, these are of the descendants of the Firbolg, of the Gailiuns, of Liogairne, and of the Fir Domhnann in Erin.
Seite 135 - ... and every man drives in three for each wife that he marries. Now the men have all many wives apiece; and this is the way in which they live. Each has his own hut, wherein he dwells, upon one of the platforms, and each has also a trap-door giving access to the lake beneath...
Seite 392 - ... carrying it up and down the town in great jollity on Midsummer Eve, to which they added the picture of a giant, was in all likelihood first instituted.4 BURFORD, Co.

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