The Ancient Stone Implements, Weapons, and Ornaments, of Great Britain

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Longmans, Green, Reader, and Dyer, 1872 - 640 Seiten

In the following pages I purpose to give an account of the various forms of stone implements, weapons, and ornaments of remote antiquity discovered in Great Britain, their probable uses and method of manufacture, and also, in some instances, the circumstances of their discovery. While reducing the whole series into some sort of classification, as has been done for the stone antiquities of Scandinavia by Worsaae, Montelius, and Sophus Müller, for those of France by Messrs. Gabriel and Adrien de Mortillet, and for those of Ireland by Sir William Wilde, I hope to add something to our knowledge of this branch of Archæology by instituting comparisons, where possible, between the antiquities of England and Scotland and those of other parts of the world. Nor in considering the purposes to which the various forms were applied, and the method of their manufacture, must I neglect to avail myself of the illustrations afforded by the practice of modern savages, of which Sir John Lubbock and others have already made such profitable use.

But before commencing any examination of special forms, there are some few general considerations on which it seems advisable to enter, if only in a cursory manner; and this is the more necessary, since notwithstanding the attention which has now for many years been devoted to Prehistoric Antiquities, there is seemingly still some misapprehension remaining as to the nature and value of the conclusions based upon recent archæological and geological investigations.

At the risk therefore of being tedious, I shall have to notice once more many things already well known to archæologists, but which, it would appear from the misconceptions so often evinced, even by those who speak and write on such matters, can hardly be too often repeated.

Not the least misunderstood of these subjects has been the classification of the antiquities of Western Europe, first practically adopted by the Danish antiquaries, under periods known as the Iron, Bronze, and Stone Ages; the Iron Age, so far as Denmark is concerned, being supposed to go back to about the Christian era, the Bronze Age to embrace a period of one or two thousand years previous to that date, and the Stone Age all previous time of man’s occupation of that part of the world.

 

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Inhalt

Cissbury Sussex
73
PAGE 8
75
CHAPTER II
78
Downs near Eastbourne
79
Sawdon N R Yorkshire 34 Weston Norfolk
80
Mildenhall Suffolk 36 Burwell Fen Cambs 37 Thetford Suffolk 38 Undley Common Lakenheath
85
Swaffham Fen Cambridge
86
Grindale Bridlington 42 North Burtou Yorkshire 6 Flake
87
CHAPTER III
89
ROUGHHEWN CELTS 93 93 04 12 Near Mildenhall Suffolk 13
93
Burradon Northumberland
94
Coton Cambridge
95
Ponteland Northumberland
96
Qulston 62 Burwell Fen Cambs 53 Botesdale Suffolk
99
One made from a Natural Prism of FlintThe long narrow FormExpanding
101
Dalmeny Linlithgow
102
Sprouston near Kelso
103
Nunnington Yorkshire
104
Burradon Northumberland
105
Near Pendle Lancashire
106
Ness N R Yorkshire
108
Gilling
109
Swinton near Malton
110
Scamridge Dykes Yorkshire 66 Whitwell
111
Thames London
112
Near Bridlington Yorkshire
113
Lakenheath Suffolk
114
Wareham Dorsetshire
116
Forfarshire
117
Bridlington Yorkshire 75 Caithness
118
Gilmerton East Lothian
119
Stirlingshire
121
Harome N R Yorkshire
121
Daviot near Inverness
122
Near Cottenham Cambs
123
Near Malton Yorkshire 82 Mennithorpe 83 Middleton Moor Derbyshire
124
Near Truro Cornwall
125
Weston Norfolk
126
Fimber 127 89 Duggleby E R
127
Guernsey
128
Hafted Celt Solway Moss 92 Cumberland
139
Monaghan 94 Axe from the Rio Frio
140
Waraxe Gaveoe Indians Brazil
141
96
142
98
143
100
145
celt Handle Schraplau
146
Adze New Caledonia
147
Clalam Indians
148
South Sea Island Adzes
149
Axe Northern Australia
150
Hatchet Western Australia
152
CHAPTER VII
154
CHAPTER VIII
163

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Seite 411 - He that hath an ear, let him hear what the Spirit saith unto the churches; To him that overcometh will I give to eat of the hidden manna, and will give him a white stone, and in the stone a new name written, which no man knoweth saving he that receiveth it.
Seite 563 - It is evident, therefore, that, when we are speculating on the excavating force which a river may have exerted in any particular valley, the most important question is, not the volume of the existing stream, nor the present levels of its channel, nor even the nature of the rocks, but the probability of a succession of floods, at some period since the time when the valley may have been first elevated above the sea.
Seite 469 - But after devoting the greater part of a day to his vast collection, I am perfectly satisfied that there is a great deal of fair presumptive evidence in favor of many of his speculations regarding the remote antiquity of these industrial objects and their association with animals now extinct.
Seite 21 - ... inches long, to give more weight to this part ; then, pressing their naked feet together, they hold the stone as with a pair of pincers or the vice of a carpenter's bench. They take the stick (which is cut off smooth at the end) with both hands, and set it well home against the edge of the front of the stone...
Seite 23 - The native, having chosen a pebble of agate, flint, or other suitable stone, perhaps as large as an ostrich egg, sits down before a larger block, on which he strikes it so as to detach from the end a piece, leaving a flattened base for his subsequent operations.
Seite 602 - ... immensely remote was the epoch, when what is now that vast bay was high and dry land, and a long range of chalk downs, 600 feet above the sea, bounded the horizon on the south? And yet this must have been the sight that met the eyes of those primeval men who frequented the banks of that ancient river which buried their handiworks in gravels that now cap the cliffs, and of the course of which so strange but indubitable a memorial subsists in what has now become the Solent Sea.
Seite 501 - I think, evidently weapons of war, fabricated and used by a people who had not the use of metals. They lay in great numbers at the depth of about twelve feet, in a stratified soil, which was dug into for the purpose of raising clay for bricks.
Seite 430 - ... out of those thirty-one, all, with the exception of six, are still living in our island. The cave bear, cave lion, and cave hyaena had vanished away, along with a whole group of pachyderms, and of all the extinct animals but one, the Irish elk, still survived.
Seite 201 - Mr. John Evans* figures a grooved pebble very large in comparison with our New Jersey specimens, as a " grooved hammer," (?) and says of it and similar ones, " They were originally regarded as stone-hammers, but such as I have examined are made of a softer stone than those usually employed for hammers, and they are not battered or worn at the ends. It seems, therefore, probable that they were used as sinkers for nets and lines, for which purpose they are well adapted, the groove being deep enough...
Seite 598 - Neolithic periods); so far as any intermediate forms of implements are concerned ; and here at least, the race of men who fabricated the latest of the Palaeolithic implements may "have, and in all probability had, disappeared, at an epoch remote from that when the country was again occupied by those who not only chipped out but polished their flint tools, and who were moreover associated with a mammalian fauna far nearer resembling that of the present day than that of the Quatenary times." M. Gabriel...

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